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June 2021

From vocational school to the chair of CEO

By Vocational school

Interview

The journey of Eternity-IT CEO, Asaf Bar, to create his IT company has had many twists and turns. Along the way, he burned down a computer, worked in his basement, and created an app to find missing people.

Maya manela 12:2406.27.21

When Asaf Bar, CEO of Eternity-IT, was 8 years old, he received his first IBM computer and, that same day, burned it down. “I wanted to see how it worked. I opened it to find out its chips and burned it after two minutes when I touched contacts. We replaced it, but this computer was my doorstep. I entered the development world, bought books and started learning software languages, ”said Bar.

Although he was interested in computers from an early age, his journey towards a career in technology and building an IT business was anything but routine. After not being accepted into a good high school in his hometown of Bat Yam, Bar was forced to attend a vocational school in Tel Aviv. “At that point, I realized that if I didn’t put the effort into my studies, I would have a problem later in life. I enrolled in an accounting class and graduated successfully and with full enrollment, a very rare thing in itself in this school, ”he explained. During his military service, Bar served as a border patrol fighter and two years later, due to an injury, he joined the Corps of Communications. “I insisted on getting into something about software and very quickly I found myself writing code in the Corps of Communications. Everyone there thought an employee had arrived, but I came in with it. capacities.” During his service he also began to study accounting, but later the advice of his partner’s father changed the course of his life.

Asaf Bar, CEO of Eternity-IT Photo: courtesy

“From the age of 16 I didn’t live at home, I lived with my girlfriends because, as a child of divorced parents, I was looking for a home that had both a father and a mother. During my military service, I earned my living. computer repair. It was the start of the internet age and I was more interested in the darker parts of the net – mainly hacking. My girlfriend’s father saw my skills with computers and urged me to quit accounting studies, luckily he really insisted and even helped me pay for my studies. I switched to studying computer science at Tel Aviv University. It was one of the best decisions of my life and very quickly when I was still in the military I found myself joining a startup and working in a company with people who are part of the software world. . It was the first time in my life that someone had given me a chance, ”said Bar.

After completing his military service, Bar was hired as a database supporter and intern at SRL for 4,000 NIS (about $ 1,200) per month – and thus began his career in the IT field. “I would work and study 300 hours a month. Something inside me told me that the more I knew and got involved, the more I would learn. The desire to prove myself made me work crazy hours. important for me to know a lot about a range of topics and then delve into specific topics when needed. Any shortcomings I had I was covered for dozens of hours and nights. None technological question remained unanswered on my desk. ”During this period, Bar also met his wife and had a baby girl. And with such changes in his personal life, he decided to move on to a new job.

Turning

Bar’s second opportunity was not easy. It was when he started his job at Opisoft, “I came in demanding to be CTO, which was not well accepted with only four years of experience in the field. I came for an interview, but they wanted me to be a senior developer. When I left the room the CEO said “we don’t have a CTO role at the moment, but we had a deal that went wrong. This is technology that no one here is familiar with. If you go to a meeting and are successful in bringing the project to us, the job is yours. ‘ It was a technology based on JAVA. I picked up a book and read it. I went to a meeting and it ended with us getting the project – and I getting the job. I worked at Opisoft for five years, and that’s where I was introduced to the field of BI, in which I work today. ”

After five years, when he felt he had reached his glass ceiling at Opisoft, Bar turned to his next goal, leading the field of BI on a business level. He joined Bynet Software Systems and founded its BI department. “The opportunity for me there was to set up the BI business and run the business with both hands, even though the pay was relatively low. I was there for two and a half years and the team grew to 50 people, the success was quick and I felt that things could be done differently. I had been in two companies before, and I created a business area for one of them. Bar left Bynet in 2008 to found Eternity-IT, which he still runs today.

Bar started the business from the basement of his home, and from day one he had a time reporting system, internal company emails, and even a switchboard. “Everyone laughed at me because I was a one-man business with a switchboard. As a person who always thinks big, I remember imagining where I want to go in detail and I firmly believe that the universe is listening. When you want something and strive for it, and of course, don’t lose hope and desire to achieve it – you will, ”said Bar.

The lowest point

Six months after the founding of Eternity by Bar, came the economic crisis of 2008. “No phone calls or faxes arrived. We were a very small company, 10 employees and I had no work to give them. . It was the great crisis of my career. I embarked on a new path with great self-confidence, I was responsible for families who depended on me for a living and was under pressure so that there would be no calls or faxes. And throughout that time, our competitors were jubilant and waiting for our downfall, ”said Bar.

Bar describes this period as a long and continuous day, during which he realized that he had to innovate, change his work methodology, look to different markets and keep fighting. “It was then that I discovered what it means to be a struggling entrepreneur. An ordinary entrepreneur who has dreams and wants to make them come true will jump between things – he will see that something is wrong and will move on. For me, the option of not being there did not exist, “he said. After about a year and a half, the company has 30 employees and its reputation is growing in the market. “Every person who starts a business should assume that no one will be there during hard times. That their tools are creativity and persistence. Even though I have a lot of friends in the industry, at the end of the day, everyone is committed to their own organization and not to their friend. ”

In 2015, what Bar defines as the “hottest time in business,” his father was injured in a car accident. “I found myself taking care of my father while working every day and after two months he passed away.” It was then that he decided to make another change and sold part of the Eternity group to Aman for tens of millions of shekels. “I divorced and started on a new and better path for myself. I decided I wanted to relieve myself and sold to the Aman group. Sometimes you have to neutralize your ego in order to grow. C “was one of the most important decisions because by partnering with Aman, Eternity moved into the big leagues. We were 250 employees and in four years we became 500. Number two in the Israeli market in terms of data” , did he declare.

Hazilu

A missing person case in 2018 greatly affected Bar and prompted him to take action. Noga Yitzhak, 34, from Tel Aviv was last seen in Ramat Gan before disappearing two days before her birthday. Bar set out to create Hazilu (a call for help in Hebrew), an app that helps parents of disabled children and children of elderly people with dementia protect their families and locate them if necessary. . “I went to meet Noga Yitzhak’s dad, Ron and asked him what we as a tech community can do. He said he got hundreds of photos from people who say they saw Noga and what “He can’t really identify it. I realized it was solvable. and that’s where the business came from,” Bar said.

To date, the app, which uses facial recognition technology, has helped locate hundreds of people and reconnect them with their families. “In a two-year process, we reached dozens of local authorities and mobilized them for the project. We have 450,000 registered users and I am very proud of this company. It’s free and it’s for a good cause.

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New Religious School Principal Joins Beth Orr Temple in Coral Springs • Coral Springs Talk

By Religious school
Jeannine Cotler, principal of the Temple Beth Orr religious school in Coral Springs.

Jeannine Cotler, principal of the Temple Beth Orr religious school in Coral Springs.

By Sharon Aron Baron

Jeannine Cotler wants to take the religious school of Temple Beth Orr in a new direction.

The new principal of the Rosenberg religious school changes the model for both teachers and students by immerse yourself in the experiences of what it means to be Jewish using a multisensory approach.

This includes learning to read, understand and appreciate Hebrew in a new and meaningful way.

President Steven Marcus said they were particularly excited about the paradigm shift in their approach to religious school.

“As Jews, we believe that we never stop learning. This is evident at Temple Beth Orr, where we take lifelong learning to heart with our many varied programs and courses offered throughout the year.

Cotler has been a member of Temple Beth Orr for 21 years, and during that time she chaired the religious school committee and served as an officer and trustee on the board.

She received her BA in Elementary Education from Nova Southeastern University and spent many years teaching in private and public schools including the Kuhn Early Childhood Center in Temple Beth Orr and Rosenberg Religious School.

Her four children grew up in Temple Beth Orr and are the products of their many educational avenues.

“I am here now, as a director, because of my love for the Beth Orr Temple and my passion and enthusiasm for Jewish education,” Cotler said.

Temple Beth Orr offers a unique one-day-a-week, interactive Sunday morning religious school program for children in Kindergarten to Grade 7. Hebrew reading instruction is organized online in small groups.

They also offer post-B’nai Mitzvah discussion-based classes for grades 8-12, including a grade 10 confirmation program. There is also a youth program in Grades 3 to 12 that focuses on fun social events.

Located at 2151 Riverside Drive in Coral Springs, Temple Beth Orr is a multi-generational, multi-ethnic community of singles, couples, interfaith and gay and lesbian families.

The oopening day of the religious school in Beth Orr Temple is Sunday, August 29, 2021.

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Sharon Aron Baron
Sharon Aron Baron

Editor-in-chief of Talk Media and editor for Coral Springs Talk. CST was established in 2012 to provide information, sights and entertainment to residents of Coral Springs and the rest of South Florida.

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Riley pledges to enforce new rules for admission to vocational schools

By Vocational school

BOSTON (SHNS) – Regulations passed on Tuesday intended to affect applicants for the 2022-2023 school year will require vocational and technical schools to develop their own admission policies “that promote fair access”, removing the requirement as per in which the grades, attendance, disciplinary records and recommendations of counselors are used as admission criteria.

Elementary and Secondary Education Commissioner Jeff Riley said the new regulations would bring Massachusetts more in line with other states, give state officials the power to intervene in cases of non-compliance and a process that has “remained untouched” for 20 years.

“Last year we gave vocational schools the opportunity to make changes, and we didn’t feel like they had done a big enough job to do it, so we’re asking today ‘ hui the opportunity to intervene, if necessary, to make sure the children have a fair chance, ”Riley said before the elementary and secondary education board voted to approve the new regulation.

He said his ministry planned to “be very aggressive” in cases of non-compliance and could “order changes to admissions policies that may include the requirement of a lottery” in those cases.

A February analysis of waitlist data shows that demand for vocational education in Massachusetts exceeds available places, with 1.75 student applications completed for each program place. In some communities, according to the analysis, the number of applications has reached double the number of places available.

This review also identified disparities in the number of offers of admission made for different subgroups of students, concluding that “students of color, students identified as economically disadvantaged, students with disabilities, learners of English and students [whose] the first language is not English received fewer offers of admission.

A group called the Vocational Education Justice Coalition had urged the state to move towards a lottery-based admissions system, and before the vote called on coalition members described as access and equity gaps in the new approach.

Lunenburg Senator John Cronin also called for changes, using the public comment period at Tuesday’s meeting to point out three questions he wanted answered: which admission scores need to be set, which are fair, and fair and which require an admission lottery.

“I’m afraid the answers to these questions will vary from district to district, from a board member to a board member, from a commissioner to a commissioner, from a school administrator to a school administrator,” did he declare. “Until we have clear regulations and standards that provide clear answers to these questions, we are only answering the more difficult questions surrounding this problem.”

No member of the board of directors voted against the settlement. Parents’ representative Mary Ann Stewart voted “present”.

“I am also very happy to see the coalition’s collaborative effort with the commissioner and the ministry working together to put in place a good policy. I don’t think we’re there yet, personally, ”said Stewart.

Among other speakers who addressed the council during its public comment period, parents raised concerns about the wearing of masks in schools.

Speakers raised issues including conflicting messages students could receive if unmasked adults force them to wear masks and an uneven landscape in schools if individual districts are able to choose whether or not to impose masks .

At several points in the meeting, board chair Katherine Craven asked members of the public to remain silent so the board could continue, including in a case where the crowd booed after an update on the assessment of Riley’s performance. Some in the crowd continued to shout comments – although not all were fully audible on the livestream, one person said the masks oppressed children and another asked board members how they slept the night.

After Riley introduced the Vocational School Rules, a “let her speak” chant rose in the audience and the board rose for a break. After the meeting resumed, it was punctuated by the sounds of people knocking on windows outside.

“We understand that there are people who are unhappy with the wearing of the mask that must have taken place,” Riley said. “I’m not sure the masks are coming off and being asked why they keep banging.”

Over the weekend, Riley handed out advice clarifying that education officials will href = ‘https: //statehousenews.com/brief/2021910 ′> recommend, but not require, that students and staff wear masks during summer school programs. All health and safety recommendations, including mask and social distancing requirements, are expected to be lifted for the 2021-2022 school year.

When asked about the department’s position on summer masking on Tuesday, Massachusetts Teachers Association president Merrie Najimy said her union believed there was no one-size-fits-all because children under 12 years are not yet eligible for COVID-19 vaccines and vaccination and infection rates. vary by community.

“Each local community should decide who should and should not be masked according to their situation,” she told the press service.

[Chris Van Buskirk contributed reporting]
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Board of Education approves changes to vocational school admissions

By Vocational school

Under new state regulations, vocational and technical schools in Massachusetts will need to recalibrate their admissions systems to prevent what advocates see as decades of discrimination and missed opportunity.

A coalition of groups that have pushed for change applaud the rule adopted by the State Council for Primary and Secondary Education on Tuesday. But some said it still leaves too much room for exclusion and could leave room for violations of federal civil rights law.

There is a great demand for a place in one of the state’s technical and vocational high schools. A recent state report found that across Massachusetts, more than 18,500 aspiring ninth graders applied for just 10,616 open places, with stiffer competition in some parts of the state (PDF) .

And as vocational and technical schools assess candidate grades, disciplinary and attendance records, and teacher recommendations, they tend to block disproportionate numbers of students of color, learners of color from their waiting lists. English and low income students.

The new regulation aims to change that. It prohibits schools from taking into account student excused absences from school or “minor” disciplinary incidents in admission decisions. And it’s asking schools to publish admission plans every fall that meet federal Title VI anti-discrimination guidelines.

Ahead of the board vote on Tuesday, Education Secretary Jim Peyser approved the settlement, saying it “dramatically changes the landscape” around vocational school admissions.

“There is now a positive obligation on school committees to adopt non-discriminatory policies and to react proactively whenever there is evidence that there is a disparate impact,” said Peyser.

Speakers from the Vocational Education Justice Coalition, which had pushed for admissions reform, were more low-key in their praise.

“We are concerned that many children face the exact same problem that their older siblings have faced for two decades.”

Peter Enrich, President of the Progressive Democrats of Massachusetts

“It was a step in the right direction – but a relatively small step – towards solving a very serious problem,” said Peter Enrich, chairman of the Massachusetts Progressive Democrats, who was part of that coalition.

Enrich said the previous system – which gave scarce professional places to students who had felt relatively comfortable in traditional classrooms – made “absolutely no sense, from a political point of view. “, and therefore welcomed this change.

But Enrich, the former general counsel for the state’s finance and administration ministry, said the new rule was still not enough: leaving schools to comply with complex federal civil rights protections and not put in place a “very flexible process” for the state to deal with cases of disparate impact when they arise.

“We are concerned that many children face the exact same problem that their older siblings have faced for two decades,” Enrich said.

Many coalition members argued that a simple lottery would be a fairer way to ensure that vocational schools welcome volunteer applicants looking for an alternative mode of public education – and would more clearly stay on the good side of the relevant federal law.

At Tuesday’s meeting, Peyser argued that nationwide, many vocational schools have “no objection” selective admission systems from federal education officials. “The presence of admission criteria themselves does not necessarily imply discrimination or disparate impact,” he said. “It’s the implementation of those policies, the details, that matter.

Dinanyili Paulino, another member of the coalition, said she was still concerned that the young students she works with may still be “discouraged” by the persistence of selective admission systems separating them from vocational education.

Paulino, chief operating officer of Chelsea-based non-profit La Colaborativa, said the pandemic had drawn attention to the dearth of well-paying jobs available to immigrant-rich communities like Chelsea, Everett. and Revere, and the economic disasters that can result.

Just this week, said Paulino, an 18-year-old working with La Colaborativa dropped out of high school to help her mother with the housework.

She says, ‘I want to finish school, but I really need the money, “Paulino said.” So now she is now waking up at 2 am and going to clean the buildings with her mother. La This particular youngster’s situation would have been much better if she had been in a professional setting.

Paulino said as she celebrated the new rule, she thinks policymakers in the state don’t understand cases like this: “Why don’t we turn our attention to young people who not only want and desire to go learn in them? “

Under the new regulations, schools will be required to submit their scheduled admissions program by October 1 of this year.

Enrich said he hoped the settlement would work as advertised, but that he and like-minded advocates would explore other options – including a push for federal litigation – if that wasn’t enough.

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Religious school told boys to rate girls on ‘appearance and virginity’ in bizarre lesson

By Religious school

‘Build ab *** h’: Religious school told boys to rate girls on ‘looks and virginity’ in bizarre lesson that saw being ‘caring and generous’ ranked low

  • Boys at prestigious school said to award points for what they look for in a girl
  • Grade 10 students were asked to award 25 points based on traits such as popularity
  • This category was worth six points but only one point accumulated for sincerity
  • Some of the male students who participated in the activity called it “build ab *** h”

Boys in a religious school were asked to award points for the qualities they look for in a girl in a classroom activity that students mockingly described as “building ab *** h.”

Grade 10 students at St Luke’s Grammar School on Sydney’s North Beaches were asked to award 25 points by choosing categories such as popularity, loyalty and attractiveness to build their ideal wife.

While these categories were worth six points each, traits such as generosity and “caring for the world” were only worth one.

Some of the male students who participated in the lesson called the grading activity “build ab *** h”, The Sydney Morning Herald reported.

Grade 10 students at a prestigious religious school on Sydney’s North Beaches were asked to award points for the qualities they look for in a girl during an in-class lesson

HOW TENTH-GRADE STUDENTS WERE ASKED TO BUILD THEIR IDEAL WOMEN

Six points: Popular, loyalty, good looking, strong Christian, trustworthy

Five points: sense of humor, wisdom, fitness

Four points: sporting prowess / sexiness, honesty, friendliness

Three points: “Good pedigree”, ambition, work ethic, the ability to embrace

Two points: height, academic success, social confidence

One point: Sincerity, sense of adventure, “concern for the world”, generosity

Students in the class could also spend five points to make their ideal woman “fit”, and four points to make them “sporty / sexy”.

Two points were awarded for their game to be socially strong or at the right height.

“All the girls were disgusted and really offended,” said one student.

Meanwhile, the 10th graders received a separate lesson in which they were told to protect their virginity until marriage and warned of Satan’s role in encouraging casual sex.

The school principal has since apologized and said the teacher who led the activity was “saddened” that it offended.

“This term, students examined the complex issues of consent and toxic masculinity and compared the negative images portrayed in society with God’s plan for strong and healthy relationships where people respect each other as equals,” he said. said St Luke’s manager Geoff Lancaster.

Categories that male students could choose from during the course at St Luke's Grammar School to build their ideal wife included popularity, loyalty, and attractiveness.

Categories that male students could choose from during the course at St Luke’s Grammar School to build their ideal wife included popularity, loyalty, and attractiveness.

In a public statement, he admitted the activity was a “good example of how the best of intentions can go horribly wrong.”

He said a teacher was voluntarily removed from his post while the lesson was under investigation.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted St Luke’s for further comment.

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court upholds tuition fees for students of a religious school | Vermont News

By Religious school

By KATHY McCORMACK, Associated Press

A federal appeals court on Wednesday explained its decision to prevent Vermont from excluding tuition funding for students attending a religious school, saying a lower court ruling earlier this year did not go far enough to achieve it.

The notice follows a February 2nd Circuit injunction against the state, and in light of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year that states cannot abolish schools religious programs that send public money to private education.

The appeals court issued its injunction on behalf of four Catholic high school students, their parents and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington.

The case concerns a voucher program that allows students from communities that do not have a school or are not part of watchdog unions to attend schools of their choice, including approved private institutions. The students requested reimbursement of the Catholic high school tuition, but were refused on the grounds that the school is a religiously affiliated school.

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A federal judge agreed in January that students should not be excluded from funding, but did not allow them to participate in the voucher program until the case is resolved. The judge felt that the state needed an opportunity to develop new eligibility criteria for the vouchers. But the students wanted to participate in the voucher program this semester.

The appeals court ordered the judge to change the decision so that the students could be reimbursed.

“Today the court strongly affirmed the principle that believers deserve equal access to the public benefits that everyone gets,” said Paul Schmitt, legal counsel for Alliance Defending Freedom, who represented the students on Wednesday. “Once Vermont chose to subsidize private education, it couldn’t disqualify some private schools just because they are ‘too religious’. When the state offers parents the choice of school, it cannot withdraw the choice of a religious school. “

Ted Wilson, spokesperson for the Vermont Education Agency, said the agency is not commenting on pending litigation.

In June 2020, the United States Supreme Court, by a 5: 4 vote, upheld a Montana scholarship program that allows state tax credits for private education in which nearly all recipients attend religious schools.

A lawsuit brought by three Maine families who want the state to pay religious school fees has been dismissed by the Boston 1st Circuit Court of Appeals. The families appealed to the United States Supreme Court.

Copyright 2021 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Grand jury indicts 7 people in vocational school fraud case

By Vocational school

Posted:
Update:

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KGET) – A grand jury has indicted seven people linked to a vocational school in Bakersfield for allegedly stealing more than $ 100,000 in compensation intended to help injured workers.

Those charged were employees and owners of the Instituto Hispano Americano, located on Chester Avenue, according to a statement from the Kern County District Attorney’s Office. Employees of two local law firms have also been charged.

The law firms were not named in the statement. Prosecutors said they are not disclosing this information at this time “because the alleged actions of the individuals have not been attributed to law firms or other employees / owners of the law firms.”

Anna Ayala-Reyes, Sylvia Carrillo, Evelyn Cruz, Martin Cruz, Nelfido Rolando Cruz, Cynthia Ozaeta and Sandra Paredez have pleaded not guilty to a total of 85 counts. The charges include conspiracy, concealing facts about insurance benefits and concealing financial interests.

Their next hearing is scheduled for June 11.

“Like many types of programs that benefit the general public, workers’ compensation laws can only help those who need them most if they are protected against fraud and other schemes designed to deflect funds, ”District Attorney Cynthia Zimmer said in the statement. “When evidence of abuse of the workers’ compensation system is identified, it will be investigated and prosecuted to hold offenders accountable and ensure that benefits remain available to those who truly are. qualified to receive them. “

Prosecutors said the charges were related to the alleged misuse of supplemental travel allowance vouchers, which provide injured workers with disabilities up to $ 6,000 to retrain to make them more competitive on the job. the work market.

The defendants are charged with defrauding 20 insurance companies over $ 100,000 by operating the voucher program. They sent false or misleading documents to insurance companies claiming injured workers were eligible to receive vouchers despite the students failing to meet minimum qualifications for the program, the indictment says . It is alleged that the school lied about dozens of test results required for enrollment.

The injured workers were referred to the school by employees of local law firms who were paid up to $ 600 for each dismissal, prosecutors said.

The investigation, which spanned years, included several search warrants, arrests in several counties and the examination of thousands of seized documents.

“By allegedly abusing benefits designed to help injured workers re-enter the workforce and earn a living, this company has deceived workers, insurance companies and our state,” Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara said in the press release. “Worker’s Compensation Bonds are a vital program for retraining injured workers and the Department of Insurance will continue to protect it. “

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Court upholds public funds for religious school tuition in Vermont case

By Religious school

A federal appeals court on Wednesday explained its decision to prevent Vermont from excluding tuition funding for students attending a religious school, saying a lower court ruling earlier this year did not go far enough to achieve it.

The notice follows a February 2nd Circuit injunction against the state, and in light of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year that states cannot abolish schools religious programs that send public money to private education.

The appeals court issued its injunction on behalf of four Catholic high school students, their parents and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington.

The case concerns a voucher program that allows students from communities that do not have a school or are not part of watchdog unions to attend schools of their choice, including approved private institutions. The students requested reimbursement of the Catholic high school tuition, but were refused on the grounds that the school is a religiously affiliated school.

A federal judge agreed in January that students should not be excluded from funding, but did not allow them to participate in the voucher program until the case is resolved. The judge felt that the state needed an opportunity to develop new eligibility criteria for the vouchers. But the students wanted to participate in the voucher program this semester.

The appeals court ordered the judge to change the decision so that the students could be reimbursed.

“Today the court strongly affirmed the principle that believers deserve equal access to the public benefits that everyone gets,” said Paul Schmitt, legal counsel for Alliance Defending Freedom, who represented the students on Wednesday. “Once Vermont chose to subsidize private education, it couldn’t disqualify some private schools just because they are ‘too religious’. When the state offers parents the choice of school, it cannot withdraw the choice of a religious school. “

Ted Wilson, spokesperson for the Vermont Education Agency, said the agency is not commenting on pending litigation.

In June 2020, the United States Supreme Court, by a 5 to 4 vote, upheld a Montana scholarship program that allows state tax credits for private education in which nearly all recipients attend religious schools.

A lawsuit brought by three Maine families who want the state to pay religious school fees has been dismissed by the Boston 1st Circuit Court of Appeals. The families appealed to the United States Supreme Court.


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