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July 2021

TINT unveils a renovated shrine, a new religious school | Local News

By Religious school

At the top of the new religious school building of the Temple Israel Ner Tamid is the founding text of the school: “Thou shalt diligently teach them to your children,” from Deuteronomy 6: 7.

The verse means more to TINT than an old collection of words – it symbolizes the temple’s deep and long-standing dedication to education.

Now anchored in the walls and floors of its new 6,130 square foot religious school extension and refurbished sanctuary, TINT’s membership in education can be seen by anyone entering its building at 1732 Lander Road in Mayfield Heights. New construction and renovations were completed earlier this month in July after starting in late November. And now the community can see the results of this work when TINT holds its open house and dedication from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on August 22.

“There aren’t many congregations that are building religious schools,” Rabbi TINT Matthew Eisenberg told the Cleveland Jewish News on July 19. “But for us, it shows real faith in our future and that we are building for it. … We are building schools to teach the commandments, the teachings of God, to your children.

The idea for the temple’s religious school expansion had been swirling for years, but its pressing need emerged about six years ago, TINT president Richard Freedman told CJN on July 19.






Israel Ner Tamid Temple President Richard Freedman, left to right, Academic Director Edna Akrish and Rabbi Matthew Eisenberg inside the temple’s renovated shrine.




The one-classroom school-like configuration of the religious school where students of all ages learned together in the main hall quickly exceeded its space. TINT has set up classrooms delimited by partitions in the social hall, while other classrooms have been set up in the basement and in the laundry room. The size of students attending religious school has increased to 35.

In 2014, the Mayfield Heights Fire Department said TINT could no longer run classes there.

“At this point, we knew we had to do something,” Freedman said.

The TINT leadership team immediately set out to plan and fundraise for a brand new religious school, as well as renovations and technology updates to its shrine. The temple bought and bulldozed two neighboring houses, giving TINT an extended building and green space.

The completed additions created a new religious school with four separate classrooms for grade levels, offices for 10-11 educators, and a library; an open atrium for onegs and musical performances on its newly acquired grand piano; bathrooms and terrace.






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Rabbi Eisenberg admires the view outside the new atrium of the Israel Ner Tamid Temple.




The updated sanctuary has been refurbished into a completely remodeled space with all new finishes. In total, the new religious school building and renovated shrine cost $ 1.2 million, Freedman said.

At the forefront of construction, the temple had to be given a technological makeover to better educate its students, said Edna Akrish, director of education at TINT. TINT’s religious education program is offered to 3-year-olds at senior high school levels.

“Our greatest asset is our children… and they learn differently than before, even five or ten years ago,” Akrish told CJN. “The idea that the technology must be as important or even more important than the structure itself has been a common thread from the beginning of this project.

Religious school classrooms and library feature large-screen virtual whiteboards with zoom capability, touchscreen interactions, and Microsoft and Internet access. The entire temple has widespread Wi-Fi.






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Rabbi Matthew Eisenberg of Temple Israel Ner Tamid shows off the large-screen virtual whiteboard with zoom capability, touchscreen interaction, and Microsoft and Internet access located in the library of the temple’s brand new religious school.




TINT staff have learned from the COVID-19 pandemic how important it is to have the ability to deliver services to those who cannot physically attend. To modernize its ongoing service broadcasts, Freedman said the shrine needs to become a television studio of sorts.

The sanctuary features three pan, tilt, and zoom cameras, and two portable cameras can be used in the sanctuary, atrium, or new patio. The sanctuary also has improved lighting and sound systems, as well as a hearing loop that has been installed in the ground to allow people with hearing aids to hear everything better.






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The interior of the renovated shrine of the Israel Ner Tamid Temple.




“Even if you don’t live in Cleveland you can still learn here, what we found out that was very important,” Freedman said.

For Eisenberg, completing the renovations was like watching her family receive a much-needed improved home. He pointed out that from the time TINT was established it was a warm and welcoming Hamish – Yiddish congregation.

“Creating a bigger space doesn’t mean you’ll lose heat,” Eisenberg said. “We will continue to work to be that kind of warm and welcoming place, and we will. We will just be able to do it for our faithful in a better way and in a more pleasant space than before. “

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Commentary: End Discrimination in Maine Against Religious School Families

By Religious school

Parents scored a victory in June 2020 when the United States Supreme Court ruled that school choice programs must be religion neutral.

The notice meant the government should neither favor nor oppose Maine farmers Troy and Angela Nelson, who prefer religious education for their children. Sadly, government-led discrimination against the couple continued in Palermo, a small town outside of Augusta that does not have public high schools.

Maine allows tuition assistance in such situations, allowing parents to send their children to public or private schools of their choice. The Nelson’s found the best solution for their family at Temple Academy, a sectarian school near Waterville, but the state excludes educational service providers who teach from a religious perspective.

The emphasis on non-sectarian education is relatively new. Maine started its “city class” program in 1873, and for more than 100 years the state has let parents choose secular or religious options. The hands-off approach ended in 1980, when the state chose religious schools and prohibited parents from choosing them.

No longer having an alternative, the Nelson’s moved to a secular private school. They also partnered with the First Liberty Institute and our company, the Institute for Justice, and fought back in federal court along with two other families facing similar discrimination.

Their legal argument is simple: rather than stay out of religion, Maine took sides, violating the Free exercise clause of the First Amendment.

Something similar happened in the recent Supreme Court case, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, in which the Institute for Justice set a historic precedent on behalf of three Montana families. The decision ended a government policy that prohibited parents from choosing schools simply because of their religious status.

Four months later, however, the 1st US Court of Appeals went in the opposite direction in the Nelsons case and upheld the exclusion of religious schools. To reach decision, the appeals court made an odd distinction between religious “status” and “use”. The appeals court recognized that Maine cannot discriminate against religious schools, according to Espinoza, but it upheld Maine’s ability to discriminate against schools that teach from a religious perspective.

The Nelsons see a distinction without a difference.

By definition, religious schools teach religious things. Otherwise, they wouldn’t be religious. Using the same twisted logic, the Nelson’s could enroll their children in a football league that doesn’t play football. After each practice, they could go to an ice cream shop that does not serve ice cream.

The 6th and 10th Circuits have already rejected the status-use distinction, and Supreme Court Judge Neil Gorsuch has expressed his own skepticism to Espinoza. A little over a year later, on July 2, the High Court agreed to settle the case in Nelsons, Carson v. Makin.

In addition to ending the debate over the use of the statute, the case will rest on a second distinction: that parents – not the government – choose Maine’s Tuition Assistance Program schools.

While a constitutional conflict could arise if the government required children to receive a religious education, parents can make that choice under a generally available public assistance program, which is their right.

New Hampshire, which has educational cities similar to Maine, recently agreed. After an institute for justice trial and months of legislative debate, New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu signed a bill July 7 which ends the exclusion of religious schools from the state student aid program.

Now New Hampshire parents can decide for themselves what is best for them. The Nelson could too, if Maine stopped playing puns and returned power to the people.


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Beshear announces $ 75 million in vocational school renovations

By Vocational school

KENTUCKY – About $ 75 million in grants goes to modernizing vocational schools, as part of Governor Andy Beshear’s Better Kentucky Plan, which “helps create opportunities for families in all corners of the Commonwealth,” according to a statement from his office. The Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission (SFCC) is now accepting applications for these grants.


What would you like to know

  • About $ 75 million in grants go to modernizing vocational schools
  • Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission (SFCC) is now accepting applications for these grants
  • Eligible schools can submit applications, which will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. on August 13, for a maximum of $ 10 million for renovations.
  • Applicants will be scored on various criteria

“Vocational schools play a crucial role in preparing our employees for the jobs of today and tomorrow,” said Beshear. “My administration will always put education first, and that includes making sure our school facilities have the structural upgrades and technology necessary to serve our students in the future.”

Eligible schools can submit applications, which will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. on August 13, for up to $ 10 million for renovations. The governor’s office said the request has been sent to individual districts that qualify for this funding pool. Funding will then be granted by the SFCC on September 1.

Local Vocational Education Centers (LAVEC) which are district-managed vocational and technical education centers included in district installation plans are eligible to apply for funding to cover the cost of renovations, such as upgrading. update, expansion, repair, replacement or reconstruction of a structure. Each district can only receive one grant.

Applicants will be scored on the following criteria, provided by the governor’s office:

  • Age of current vocational education institution;
  • Financial need;
  • Enrollment in job creation and training programs as a percentage of total district enrollments;
  • Unemployment rate by county in May 2021; and
  • Quality of planning and layout of district facilities.

Applications, along with supporting documents, should be emailed to [email protected] by the deadline and mailed to 700 Louisville Road, Carriage House, Frankfort, Kentucky, 40601. Incomplete applications will not be considered. account.


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Elizabethtown College Launches Graduate and Vocational School | State

By Vocational school

Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, July 7, 2021 / PRNewswire / -Recently Elizabethtown College Launch of the Graduate College (SGPS). Formerly known as the Continuing Vocational School since 1951, SGPS has maintained its foundation for over a century while offering innovative graduate and online programs and micro-degrees in a variety of flexible formats. I am. Elizabethtown College Excellence with the access and flexibility that lifelong learners demand.

“The Graduate College aims to provide students with a global academic program, relationship-based lifelong learning, personalized support, and the personal flexibility that students have learned to experience at Etown. “.” Elizabethtown College President Cecilia M. McCormick, JD said. Our enhanced schools provide students, businesses and organizations with a variety of options to expand their knowledge and enhance their careers and transform their workforce by strengthening their skills. “

Globally, Elizabethtown College Adult learner satisfaction includes institutional effectiveness, campus climate, enrollment effectiveness, academic counseling, admissions and financial aid, service excellence, and safety and security. SGPS also offers students:

  • Undergraduate degree, graduate degree, cumulative degree
  • Hundreds of online courses
  • Teachers are practice teachers and professionals who bring content and working expertise into the classroom.
  • All students will be assigned an educational advisor
  • Free tutoring service that provides 24/7 online tutoring
  • Partnering with business leaders and organizations to provide education A professional skills development program for employees Affinity Award
  • Transfer of credits from previous institutions, military training and work experience

“The number of enrollments in our graduate programs has tripled in the past year,” he said. Elizabethtown College

Jack Rice, Dean of the Graduate School of Specialized Research. “We are seeing a growing demand for certificates and micro-certification programs that are fully stacked and allow students to advance in their careers and businesses. “

In regards to Elizabethtown College

Elizabethtown CollegeLocated in the center-south Lancaster County, PennsylvaniaIs a private coeducational institution offering more than 50 degrees in health, science, engineering, political science, business, communication, art and music, and education. Details: etown.edu ..

Executive Director of Marketing and Communications

Source Elizabethtown College

Elizabethtown College Launches Graduate and Vocational School | State

Source Link Elizabethtown College Launches Graduate and Vocational School | State

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Carter vocational school construction change | New

By Vocational school

Carter County School District’s plans to build a brand new tech center are being redesigned.

Superintendent Ronnie Dotson said the district plans to build a new facility to house the programs, but the request for a $ 10 million renovation grant has brought new possibilities.

The School Facilities Construction Commission received $ 75 million in general funds for the 2021-22 school year through Bill 556, section 18. The local school district which has vocational education centers in the region is now eligible to receive up to $ 10 million specified for renovation expense support.

“Our vocational school is the # 1 need in our district,” Dotson said of how the needs are categorized in the local planning document. “It will really help us get that $ 10 million.”

No action by the board of directors has been taken. Dotson had just heard the news of the possibility on Wednesday.

“It is more than likely that we will take a path to renovate the existing vocational school rather than building a new one,” he said.

Dotson said his understanding was that the grant was allocated specifically for renovations and not for new construction, much like the grant East Carter High School received through Governor Andy Beshear’s Better Kentucky Plan. The $ 14 million allocated to East High is specifically for renovations and cannot be used for anything else, Dotson said.

“In order not to lose $ 10 million, I’m sure we would just renovate the existing building instead of going somewhere else and building a new one,” Dotson said.

“It’s different from our original plan to build an entirely new one, but with $ 10 million we’ll be able to make a new one,” Dotson said. The district will not demolish the old one, because the funding will not allow it.

“Basically what would have to happen, to be worth $ 10 million, would be to gut it almost completely and do it again,” said Dotson of the current center.

The grant is due in August 13, and applications began to be accepted on Thursday.

Dotson said the district will apply and believes the school has a good chance of receiving the money depending on grant and writing language requirements.

The renovation of the technical center is another on a growing list of construction projects in the neighborhood.

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US Supreme Court to Deal with Religious Schools Dispute Next Term | Civil rights news

By Religious school

Judges refuse to accept case of florist in Washington state sanctioned for refusing to provide flowers for same-sex marriage.

The United States Supreme Court on Friday challenged two families with children attending Christian schools against a Maine tuition assistance program that prohibits taxpayer money from being used to pay taxes. religious educational establishments.

The nine-member Supreme Court, which has a Conservative 6-3 majority, has refused to accept the case of a Colorado florist who refused to provide services for a same-sex marriage, leaving in place a lower court ruling that the florist broke anti-discrimination laws.

The announcement of accepted and rejected cases on Friday marks the end of the Supreme Court’s current tenure, which resulted in a major 6-3 ruling on ideological lines on Thursday that could make it easier for states to adopt voting restrictions. The tribunal’s next term will begin in October.

The judges agreed to hear the appeal of families of children attending Christian schools against a lower court ruling that the Maine program did not violate the First Amendment right of the United States Constitution to the free exercise of the law. religion.

A ruling against the state of Maine could build on other court rulings in recent years allowing public funds to go to religious institutions.

The Boston-based First US Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against the families last year, ruling that Supreme Court precedents did not bar states from banning public funds from based religious entities. how those dollars would be used.

The Supreme Court on Friday dismissed several appeals, including one filed by a florist fined by Washington state for refusing to make a flower arrangement for a same-sex marriage because of her Christian beliefs.

At least four of the nine Supreme Court justices are needed for a case to be heard by the court. Only three Conservatives, Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch said they would have agreed to hear the florist’s appeal and review the decision.

Curt Freed, left, and her husband Robert Ingersoll, pictured here in 2016, have canceled their plans for a dream wedding after being turned down by a florist over fears other businesses will discriminate against them as well. [Elaine Thompson/AP Photo]

In 2018, the Supreme Court ordered Washington state courts to reconsider the case involving florist Barronelle Stutzman and her business Arlene’s Flowers.

Upon review, the Washington State Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the state courts did not act with animosity towards religion when they ruled that Stutzman violated anti-discrimination laws of state by refusing on religious grounds to provide flowers for the marriage of two gay men, Rob Ingersoll and Curt released.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which had represented Ingersoll and Freed, hailed the decision as a victory for LGBTQ rights.

“Today, the Supreme Court confirmed that LGBTQ people should receive equal service when they walk into a store,” said Ria Tabacco Mar, ACLU lawyer representing the couple and director of the ACLU Rights Project. women.

Ingersoll had been a client of Stutzman’s florist for almost ten years and she knew he was gay. But she maintained that her marriage to another man went against her religious beliefs and felt that she could not provide services for the event.

Washington state law requires companies providing services to opposite-sex couples to provide equal service to same-sex couples.

“We hope this decision sends a message to other LGBTQ people that no one should have to suffer the harm we have done,” Ingersoll said in a statement.

In another case in 2018, the United States Supreme Court overturned on narrow legal grounds a decision by a Colorado state agency against a baker who refused to bake a gay marriage cake.

The court did not rule on the discriminatory nature of the baker’s action, but found that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission had shown “religious hostility” to the baker’s Christian beliefs.

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U.S. Supreme Court to Hear Maine Religious Schools Tuition Case

By Religious school

The United States Supreme Court ruled on Friday that it would hear a case brought by families in Maine who want to use a state schooling program to send their children to religious schools.

At the heart of the matter is a rule from the Maine Department of Education that allows families who live in cities that do not have public schools to receive public tuition fees to send their children to the public or private school of their choice. This program excludes religious schools.

Families who want to send their children to Christian schools in Bangor and Waterville have filed a lawsuit to try to change that, but have been dismissed in lower federal courts. They appealed to the High Court, and the Supreme Court’s list of orders said on Friday it was handling the case.

The libertarian public interest firm Institute For Justice, which represents families, called the case a “potentially historic case” in a statement released Friday. Michael Bindas, lead counsel in the case, said by “distinguishing religion – and only religion – for exclusion from its tuition assistance program,” Maine has limited the rights of families.

“It is unconstitutional and we are convinced that the Supreme Court will hold it as well,” Bindas said in an interview with The Associated Press.

Maine has successfully defended its rule every step of the way. Maine Attorney General Aaron Frey said in a statement that religious schools are excluded from the program “because the education they provide is not equivalent to” public education.

“Parents are free to send their children to such schools if they wish, but not with public funds. I am confident that the Supreme Court will recognize that nothing in the Constitution obliges Maine to include religious schools in its public education system, ”Frey said.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Maine also filed court documents in support of Maine’s rules that exclude religious schools from the tuition program. Maine ACLU legal director Zachary Heiden said he was confident the court would uphold Maine’s rules again.

“Every court, state and federal, that has reviewed Maine’s tuition fee law has found it constitutional,” Heiden said. “We hope the United States Supreme Court agrees.”

The Supreme Court ruled in a Montana case last year that states must give religious schools the same access to public funds that other private schools enjoy. Similar issues have also been raised in other states, such as Vermont and New Hampshire.

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US Supreme Court to Hear Maine Religious Schools Tuition Case | Maine News

By Religious school

By PATRICK WHITTLE, Associated Press

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) – The United States Supreme Court ruled on Friday that it would hear a case brought by families in Maine who want to use a state schooling program to send their children to religious schools.

At the heart of the matter is a rule from the Maine Department of Education that allows families who live in cities that do not have public schools to receive public tuition fees to send their children to the public or private school of their choice. This program excludes religious schools.

Families who want to send their children to Christian schools in Bangor and Waterville have filed a lawsuit to try to change that, but have been dismissed in lower federal courts. They appealed to the High Court, and the Supreme Court’s list of orders said on Friday it was handling the case.

The libertarian public interest firm Institute For Justice, which represents families, called the case a “potentially historic case” in a statement released Friday. Michael Bindas, lead counsel in the case, said by “distinguishing religion – and only religion – for exclusion from its tuition assistance program,” Maine has limited the rights of families.

Political cartoons

“It is unconstitutional and we are convinced that the Supreme Court will hold it as well,” Bindas said in an interview with The Associated Press.

Maine has successfully defended its rule every step of the way. The Maine attorney general’s office did not immediately respond to a call for comment on Friday.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Maine also filed court documents in support of Maine’s rules that exclude religious schools from the tuition program. Maine ACLU legal director Zachary Heiden said he was confident the court would uphold Maine’s rules again.

“Every court, state and federal, that has reviewed Maine’s tuition fee law has found it constitutional,” Heiden said. “We hope the United States Supreme Court agrees.”

The Supreme Court ruled in a Montana case last year that states must give religious schools the same access to public funds that other private schools enjoy. Similar issues have also been raised in other states, such as Vermont and New Hampshire.

Copyright 2021 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Former Mary Ann Garber school turned into a vocational school

By Vocational school

HAMILTON COUNTY, Tenn (WDEF) – A new one-of-a-kind school is in the works for Hamilton County schools.

The plan is to renovate the old Mary Ann Garber School and turn it into a vocational school to help students better prepare for the future workforce.

The former Mary Ann Garber School on Roanoke Street has been unoccupied for several years now, but will soon be a fully functioning trade school for Hamilton County students.

“At the start, we’ll start with the 11th and 12th grade. There will be a possibility of dual registration with the State of Chattanooga. There will also be adults who have not completed high school and who can return for vocational training, as there will be a number of different trades that will be involved, ”said Mayor Jim Coppinger, County of. Hamilton.

The school plans to use both educators and entrepreneurs to help students not only succeed in school, but also prepare for the workforce.

“The Association of General Contractors provides people with expertise in the field. They won’t learn skills they won’t use. They will not learn things that are archaic. They will learn current affairs. Young people can go and immediately enter the labor market. They can have a good salary and competitive benefits, ”says Dr Steve Highlander, County Commissioner.

Students will be able to receive training in a multitude of trades such as: HVAC, Welding, Masonry, Carpentry, Electricity and more.

“It gives the student the opportunity to know what is going on on a job site, to be trained in what to expect on a job site, to also serve as an intern on a job site while he is doing it in preparation.” from the first day they graduate so they can go out and be productive, ”Mayor Coppinger explains.

The school is expected to cost around $ 8 million and is funded by private and public partnerships.

The vocational school is expected to open in August 2022 and plans to guarantee participating students a job in the labor market by the time they graduate.

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