Public school – Maleny Celtic http://malenyceltic.org/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 07:21:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://malenyceltic.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-25-120x120.png Public school – Maleny Celtic http://malenyceltic.org/ 32 32 Virginia Public School Enrollments Fail to Rebound From Pre-Pandemic Levels | Richmond Local News https://malenyceltic.org/virginia-public-school-enrollments-fail-to-rebound-from-pre-pandemic-levels-richmond-local-news/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/virginia-public-school-enrollments-fail-to-rebound-from-pre-pandemic-levels-richmond-local-news/ “I think it’s important to point out that a good percentage of the drop in enrollment is in the early years,” said Jon Becker, associate professor of educational leadership at Virginia Commonwealth University. “There are many possible explanations for a drop in registrations. It’s not just parents angry with public schools for the way they […]]]>

“I think it’s important to point out that a good percentage of the drop in enrollment is in the early years,” said Jon Becker, associate professor of educational leadership at Virginia Commonwealth University. “There are many possible explanations for a drop in registrations. It’s not just parents angry with public schools for the way they handled schooling during the pandemic. “

In the Richmond area, Chesterfield and Hanover counties rebounded from registrations ahead of the pandemic. Chesterfield, which lost nearly 2,000 students in the 2020 school year – when all school systems in the region except Hanover practically started – has seen an increase of 2,000 students.

Hanover, which lost around 1,000 students at the start of the pandemic, has seen an increase of around 300 students, from 16,519 students in 2020-2021 to 16,865 students this school year. In the 2019-2020 school year, the district had more than 17,000 students, according to state data. Hanover was the only school district in the Richmond area to have an in-person school five days a week at the start of the 2021 school year.

The figures for Richmond public schools are largely unclear. On paper, it appears that 7,000 students have left RPS, increasing the number of students from 28,000 to 21,000.

But the vast majority of that drop, Superintendent Jason Kamras said, is likely due to the severing of ties with Virginia Virtual Academy, a virtual school operated by K12 Inc., for which RPS served as the tax agent. The Virginia Virtual Academy is not the same as Virtual Virginia, a program run by the state Department of Education.


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One of the last non-union public school districts begins to organize | State and regional https://malenyceltic.org/one-of-the-last-non-union-public-school-districts-begins-to-organize-state-and-regional/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 02:09:48 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/one-of-the-last-non-union-public-school-districts-begins-to-organize-state-and-regional/ Educators in one of the state’s few non-union public school districts said Monday they had started organizing workers and hoped to join one of the state’s largest teachers’ unions. The majority of teachers and certified staff at Northbrook 28 Suburban School District filed cards with the Illinois Education Labor Relations Board declaring their intention to […]]]>

Educators in one of the state’s few non-union public school districts said Monday they had started organizing workers and hoped to join one of the state’s largest teachers’ unions.

The majority of teachers and certified staff at Northbrook 28 Suburban School District filed cards with the Illinois Education Labor Relations Board declaring their intention to form a union on Friday, Dan Montgomery said, president of the Northbrook Federation of Teachers District 28, Illinois Federation of Teachers.

IFT officials said the authorization cards were filed by “a strong majority of employees” from the three elementary schools and one college in District 28, and once the new union is certified, the members will begin the process of establishing the union governance structure and electing officers. .

“There are very few, only a handful, of public school districts in Illinois that are not union affiliated, and this is a K-8 district, so it’s pretty big,” Montgomery said.

If approved, 230 certified teachers and staff in District 28 will become a board of Local 1274 of the North Suburban Teachers Union, a local union of the IFT, which is a state affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers. / AFL-CIO.

District 28 Superintendent Larry Hewitt said the district was made aware of the IFT’s petition on Friday and that it “will follow the Labor Council process and respect any decision made by the majority of our staff in this regard. which concerns representation “.

The District 28 Education Board and Administration will continue to work with our professional staff, and any representative they choose, to uphold the values ​​we share in providing Northbrook District 28 students with an education. of high quality, “Hewitt said in a statement. Monday statement. “We are extremely proud of the way our staff continue to support students and their continued resilience in this third year of unprecedented circumstances due to the pandemic.”

The percentage of Illinois public educators who are union members is among the highest in the United States, said Montgomery, who estimates that less than 10% of teachers employed in public school districts across the state are not members of the IFT or the Illinois Education Association.

The IFT recently hired an additional organizer to help with what Montgomery described as a “record number” of non-union educators asking for help during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I have never seen such exhausted teachers in September, and we are still in the midst of this pandemic,” Montgomery said. “Even though our teachers are highly vaccinated, they have seen a lot of illness and even death, and they have to deal with so much right now. “

As the state’s largest teachers’ union, IEA officials said, like the IFT, they are also seeing an increase in queries during the pandemic of uncertified school workers, including teacher assistants, babysitters, dining room workers and administrative assistants, who wish to become union members. .

“We have new residents in the upstate in places like Elmwood Park, Hillside and Rockton, as well as new members in the upstate, in Chester and Casey-Westfield to name a few. -uns, “said IEA President Kathi Griffin. “The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for unions. “

According to a 2020 report from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the nationwide highest unionization rates are found among protective service workers, including police and firefighters, at around 37%, followed by education, training and library professions, at 36%. .

Northbrook Junior High School teacher Nicole Gas said that while the teachers in District 28 already had a good working relationship with the administrators and the district education council, the teachers decided to organize a union. with the aim of “streamlining communication and collaboration”.

“In the past, we had a lot of different committee meetings, but when you streamline this process, you get the time back to prepare or grade the classes,” she said. “We want to make sure we can stay focused on our students. “

“This is by no means retaliation against our administration, and we hope to be able to establish a really strong system of collaboration,” Gas added.

The relative scarcity of teacher strikes reflects the constructive working relationships typically forged between teacher unions and district administrators and education councils, said Robert Bruno, professor and director of the work education program at the school. ‘University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

Still, Bruno said the hardships caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have underscored the central role unions play in standing up for their employees, not just in schools, but across industries and professions.

“The pandemic has made all workers more vulnerable, with some being made redundant and others forced to work in conditions prejudicial to their health and safety,” Bruno said. “It is still a remarkably difficult time for educators.

Chicago Teachers Union President Jesse Sharkey, leader of IFT’s largest union, released a statement Monday welcoming District 28 employees into the fold.

“The last 20 months of the pandemic have shown that it takes strong advocacy and strong organization to create safety and protection on the ground in our school communities,” said Sharkey. “Our unity strengthens our ability to earn that security for all and ensure that every student gets the support they need. “


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Dr Sharri Coleman announces candidacy for District 5 of the Oklahoma City Public School Board with the support of longtime community leaders https://malenyceltic.org/dr-sharri-coleman-announces-candidacy-for-district-5-of-the-oklahoma-city-public-school-board-with-the-support-of-longtime-community-leaders/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 22:44:21 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/dr-sharri-coleman-announces-candidacy-for-district-5-of-the-oklahoma-city-public-school-board-with-the-support-of-longtime-community-leaders/ THE CITY OF OKLAHOMA – Today, Dr. Sharri Coleman announces his candidacy to be the next member of the Oklahoma City Public Schools School Board for District 5. His candidacy is enthusiastically supported by longtime community leaders, including Member Ruth Veales. current OKCPS District 5, current state senator. George Young and current State Representative Jason […]]]>

THE CITY OF OKLAHOMA – Today, Dr. Sharri Coleman announces his candidacy to be the next member of the Oklahoma City Public Schools School Board for District 5. His candidacy is enthusiastically supported by longtime community leaders, including Member Ruth Veales. current OKCPS District 5, current state senator. George Young and current State Representative Jason Lowe.

Each of his supporters for the office notes his dedication to service, his track record as a proven leader and his courageous spirit.

“I am happy to know that we have a passionate and capable individual who is ready to be part of the solution to ensure that true equity in education is at the forefront for ALL students and staff at OKCPS. Additionally, Sharri will be an advocate who will ensure that students and staff have all the resources they need to succeed in their chosen field, ”said Ruth Veales, current OKCPS District 5 School Board member.

“I am excited about Dr Sharri Coleman’s candidacy for the OKCPS Board of Directors, Dist. 5. My enthusiasm comes from the fact that her qualifications make her a great advocate for children and education. Her community involvement and religious foundation make me believe that she is part of the solution to making educational opportunities for our children accessible, ”said current Senator George Young.

“As a lawyer, state legislator, and chair of the Oklahoma Legislative Black Caucus, I understand how important it is to have strong leadership for our children. School boards are especially important in Oklahoma’s largest and most diverse school district. Dr. Sharri Coleman brings a fresh perspective to OKCPS and an unwavering commitment to the health, safety, academic development and well-being of our children. I applaud and fully support his candidacy for the District Five School Board seat of Oklahoma City Public Schools, ”said State Representative Jason Lowe.

Dr Sharri Coleman is motivated to seize this opportunity to serve the people of the 5th District as she understands that there is still work to be done in Oklahoma City public schools to ensure equity of resources and access to quality public schools in the communities we call. residence. She understands that in-person teaching is essential to student learning, but also wants the district to take thoughtful and intentional precautions to limit the impact of the pandemic on our educators and students. In addition, 70 percent of students in Oklahoma City public schools are members of a minority population, and about 40 percent of students have a family member currently in prison. Dr. Coleman’s experience as a classroom teacher makes her uniquely suited to lead the district to meet the needs of these students. While she knows that counseling service can take her away from her typical ministry plans, she is guided by her faith to seek opportunities to improve the education of our children.

About Dr Sharri: Dr. Sharri Coleman worked as a science teacher in Oklahoma City public schools. She is Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies (AFAM) at the University of Oklahoma. Currently, Dr Coleman is also an internship counselor for Millwood Public Schools. Prior to her classroom work, she worked as a podiatrist focusing on the treatment of foot, ankle and leg disorders. She graduated from Spelman College where she majored in chemistry / premedicine. Dr Sharri is a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine (DPM) from Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine. Originally from Philadelphia, Dr. Sharri Coleman moved to Oklahoma in 1998 as the bride of Pastor A. Byron Coleman III, who was called to serve at 5th Street Baptist Church in Oklahoma City. Dr Sharri and Pastor Coleman have been married for 24 years and have two sons who are their pride and joy, Chandler Avery and Courtland Alexander.


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Georgetown Law Clinic Hosts Annual Mock Trial Competition for DC Public School Students https://malenyceltic.org/georgetown-law-clinic-hosts-annual-mock-trial-competition-for-dc-public-school-students/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 06:20:17 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/georgetown-law-clinic-hosts-annual-mock-trial-competition-for-dc-public-school-students/ The Street Law Clinic at Georgetown University Law Center hosted its 49th annual fall mock trial event for public high school students in Washington, DC on November 4, giving attendees the opportunity to learn more about the law and practice their legal skills. Under the program, clinic students teach a one-semester course in Basic Legal […]]]>

The Street Law Clinic at Georgetown University Law Center hosted its 49th annual fall mock trial event for public high school students in Washington, DC on November 4, giving attendees the opportunity to learn more about the law and practice their legal skills.

Under the program, clinic students teach a one-semester course in Basic Legal Principles to participating Washington DC Public School (DCPS) students. At the end of the semester, students participate in a mock trial on a subject chosen by the course teachers.

DC Public Schools | The Georgetown University Law Center Street Law Clinic held its 49th annual Washington DC high school mock trial.

The program allows students to learn about the legal process and build self-esteem, according to Charisma Howell, director of the Street Law Clinic.

“The real value is in young people and seeing them accomplish something that they didn’t necessarily think they could do,” Howell said in a phone interview with The Hoya. “It can be a tremendous boost for self-confidence. It’s a very complicated process, but they work wonders every year.

As part of the program, law students create a lesson plan and run classes, which last between 60 and 90 minutes and take place two or three times a week. The courses cover a wide range of topics; however, they also help prepare students for the final mock trial competition, which takes place at the end of the semester.

Law students strive to make course material as relevant and accessible as possible for high school students, according to Howell.

“Law students need to bring law to life and make it tangible,” Howell said. “It’s about teaching the nuances of the law while infusing relevant examples that students are engaged and interested in. ”

Classes employ a variety of teaching methods, as student instructors use different techniques to teach high school students legal and public speaking skills, according to Elizabeth Choi (LAW ’22), a student coach.

“For each class, I try to incorporate several different teaching methods to accommodate the variety of ways students learn,” Choi wrote in an email to The Hoya. “There is usually always some type of reading, a worksheet, a little writing, sometimes a video, sometimes a game, and so on. One thing I almost always include is time for a class discussion / debate. “

At the end of the semester, the high schools participate in a mock trial to assess the skills acquired throughout the course. The subject of the lawsuit changes every year, with this year presenting students with a human rights case, according to Howell.

Although preparing for the trial was stressful at times due to student absences during the COVID-19 pandemic, the experience was rewarding for students and teachers, according to Shelina Warren, a teacher at Dunbar High School, a school. DCPS near the Mount Vernon Triangle. neighborhood that won the competition.

“In my opinion, preparing for the mock trial was stressful until the day of unpredictable student attendance due to a pandemic,” Warren wrote in an email to The Hoya. “It was a pleasure to see my students play, some who had struggled in various ways this semester but who lived up to the opportunity.”

While Georgetown law students helped prepare the students for the trial, the participants largely competed on their own, according to Choi.

“I helped prepare my students on their way to the mock trial and while we waited for the trial to start,” Choi wrote. “During the trial, I answered some of my students’ questions but for the most part I did not observe them.

The mock trial consists of three rounds of 15 teams, and judges count points based on various criteria, including speech and the feasibility of the legal approach presented, to determine which teams will participate in the final round, according to Howell.

Going into the tournament and winning the case was very exciting, according to Rakiah Willis, a junior at Dunbar High School.

“Preparing for the mock trial was definitely a great experience,” Willis wrote in a message to The Hoya. “It was very nice to win the case. I felt an explosion of excitement knowing that all of our hard work paid off.

Despite being nervous about the competition, Dunbar’s contestants were set to win, according to Jaquan Waller, a junior at Dunbar High School.

“I was nervous at first, but once we got through the gates I was excited and ready to win,” Waller wrote in a message to The Hoya. “When I got there I kept telling myself ‘we’re going to win’, so when we finally won I was relieved and I thought, ‘I knew this was going to happen’, but I was very happy to win. “



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Princeton Public School District hosts vaccination clinics for students, families and staff https://malenyceltic.org/princeton-public-school-district-hosts-vaccination-clinics-for-students-families-and-staff/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 16:01:48 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/princeton-public-school-district-hosts-vaccination-clinics-for-students-families-and-staff/ Princeton Public Schools and the Princeton Department of Health are teaming up to provide free COVID-19 vaccines to students, families and school district staff, including students ages 5 to 11, according to the school district officials. Superintendent of Schools Carole Kelley announced the two impending vaccination clinics at the November 9 meeting of the Princeton […]]]>

Princeton Public Schools and the Princeton Department of Health are teaming up to provide free COVID-19 vaccines to students, families and school district staff, including students ages 5 to 11, according to the school district officials.

Superintendent of Schools Carole Kelley announced the two impending vaccination clinics at the November 9 meeting of the Princeton Public Schools Education Council. She said it was “really exciting” to see younger students getting vaccinated.

The appointment-only vaccination clinics, which are not open to the public, have been set for November 30 and December 21. They will be held between 4:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. at the Suzanne Patterson Building at 45 Stockton St. The building is across the parking lot from Monument Hall.

Appointments can be made through the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System online at https://covid19.nj.gov/pages/finder or by calling 855-568-0545, officials said.

The pediatric version of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for children aged 5 to 11 will be available at both clinics. Children who receive their first dose of the Pfizer pediatric vaccine at the November 30 clinic would be eligible to receive a second dose at the December 21 clinic.

If a family misses both clinics, pediatric vaccinations will also be offered at local pediatricians’ offices, some pharmacies and Princeton University. These appointments can be made through the New Jersey Vaccine Scheduling System.

The Pfizer vaccine for children 12 to 17 years old will be available in clinics on November 30 and December 21. Adult vaccines will also be available at clinics, including booster shots for all three brands – Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson.

Eligible adults who have received a Pfizer or Moderna vaccine are eligible for a booster six months after the second dose. Those who have received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible two months after their initial dose.

As of Nov. 8, 97% of Princeton residents aged 12 to 17 had received one dose and 82% had received the second dose, making them fully vaccinated, according to the Princeton Department of Health.

All Princeton residents aged 65 or older have received both vaccines and are fully vaccinated, but only 24% of adults eligible for a booster had received one as of Nov. 8, the Princeton Department of Health said.


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RANDOM THOUGHTS | Professional Development for Our Public School Teachers – Mindanao Times https://malenyceltic.org/random-thoughts-professional-development-for-our-public-school-teachers-mindanao-times/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 02:32:33 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/random-thoughts-professional-development-for-our-public-school-teachers-mindanao-times/ “TO ENSURE that we don’t leave any child (or student) behind, we also need to make sure that no teacher is left behind.” Kurt M. Landgraf, President and CEO of Educational Testing Service, USA). To improve the standard of our public schools, we must provide our public school teachers with “the help they need and […]]]>

“TO ENSURE that we don’t leave any child (or student) behind, we also need to make sure that no teacher is left behind.”

  • Kurt M. Landgraf, President and CEO of Educational Testing Service, USA).

To improve the standard of our public schools, we must provide our public school teachers with “the help they need and want!” “According to Landgraf,” teachers need and want to do their jobs well. A good college education is important but not sufficient, and many teachers have long been removed from academia.

Teachers want the kind of professional development that will give them the knowledge and skills to help their students reach these new academic standards. They want good diagnostic information that allows them to better tailor their teaching to each student. Good professional development is an investment worth making, and we must do it if we are to achieve our goal of providing a high quality education to all students. Landgraf was talking about American teachers here.

Certainly, the “need and desire” of teachers in developing countries in this regard is much worse. Investing in the professional development of our public school teachers must be a higher priority for our government than some infrastructure projects. You don’t need financial experts to fully understand this matter that matters most. By Einstein, not knowing it’s madness!

Landgraft’s final words on the subject: “Providing high quality professional development to teachers, properly funded and well managed, is absolutely necessary to achieve the (equity) goals that we all share. “

Certainly we in the Philippines need more than that to improve the quality of our public schools.

In my previous article titled “Investing more in health and education” I wrote: “In our education program, we like to see higher salaries for teachers, developmental training for teachers, more of classrooms… The incoming administration will hopefully adopt “Education, Education, Education” as its new mantra. After massive infrastructure development, massive Total Integral Human Development must now be the national priority.

It is high time to focus on fairness now. Thus, growth with equity will rightly be called K-12 education. Equity should be a major development objective of all our various institutions, more particularly of our government. All of our development projects and programs must be strictly evaluated on how they will benefit our poor… Without a doubt .. The education program will have a direct and positive impact on the lives of our common Filipinos.

Two big challenges for our education program are: 1) The COVID-19 pandemic phenomenon, and 2) The next 4e Industrial Revolution. It is humbly suggested that our Ministry of Education and CHED form a study group to draft a “Roadmap for the Future. Capacity building for a digital world is, without a doubt, imperative to respond effectively to future demands.

My family is a family of teachers. All of my family are teachers. I dare say that teaching is the greatest profession of all. Keep in mind that our Lord Jesus Christ is the greatest Teacher of all. All parents should be their children’s first teachers. Therefore, teacher training and development should be high on the list of our government services. Sad to say, this is no longer the case now. Pagination of Congress on this nagging question. “Huwag na kayong magtulug-tulogan sa bagay na ito!”

A teacher’s prayer

Generous and eternal God, you have entrusted me with this great responsibility of making not only the spirit but the whole person of the young people in my care. Thank you for helping me grow and evolve as an educator. It is an important mission to which you have called me. Help me remember this when I’m tired of writing my lesson plans, preparing my visual material, thinking about my teaching strategy, and monitoring my students’ behavior and performance.

Help me to be patient. Always keep me healthy and calm and never be bothered by students who need special attention in class or who don’t seem to be interested in my lesson. Grant me the wisdom to learn new ideas, methods and techniques to make my lessons more fruitful and meaningful. May I be a faithful and loving instrument in building up your kingdom on earth as I try to follow the example of your Son Jesus Christ, the Greatest Teacher. Amen (Trinity D. Molina.)


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Public school enrollment in the US is unlikely to return to normal https://malenyceltic.org/public-school-enrollment-in-the-us-is-unlikely-to-return-to-normal/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 14:19:22 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/public-school-enrollment-in-the-us-is-unlikely-to-return-to-normal/ November 8, 2021 by Tamara Gilkes Borr: US Political Correspondent, The Economist, Washington, DC VSOVID-19 SPARK the largest drop in enrollment in public schools since World War II. In the early 1940s, many high school students left for the battlefield or for employment. But this time around, it is unclear where some of the missing […]]]>

VSOVID-19 SPARK the largest drop in enrollment in public schools since World War II. In the early 1940s, many high school students left for the battlefield or for employment. But this time around, it is unclear where some of the missing students have gone and many of them will not return.

The pandemic forced schools around the world to close overnight in early 2020. In America, more than 50 million students were sent home in March. At the time, few imagined that the closures would last so long. As educators tried to get students back into class in the fall, enrollment fell 3% for the 2020-21 school year. Teachers and administrators have called families and even visited students’ homes in an attempt to get them back to school or at least connect online.

Much of the decline occurred among the youngest students: kindergarten (for five-year-olds) enrollment fell 9%, and preschool (for four-year-olds) fell by 22%. The transition to online learning was the most difficult for the younger ones. In the early years, classes focus on life skills, such as learning to use the toilet and get along with peers, tasks that are difficult to learn with Zoom. Many families have decided to keep their children at home.

Preliminary enrollment figures for the current school year (2021-22) suggest these overall declines will persist until 2022. Few districts have released their figures. Hawaii, one of the few to do so, reported a loss. Before the pandemic (2019-2020), the Hawaii School District enrolled 179,331 students. It reported 4,627 fewer students in the pandemic school year (2020-21). And in fall 2021, it reported 3,104 fewer students than the year before, a 4% drop from pre-pandemic enrollments.

Some children just gave up. Some have enrolled in private schools, but probably not as many as media accounts suggest. Home schooling has become more popular. In Michigan, areas where distance education is reserved only saw a larger increase in private school enrollment, while home schooling increased more in areas where face-to-face instruction was provided. Different concerns about the virus have prompted families to make different choices.

Learning loss will continue to be a concern in 2022, especially among younger children

Many students have left for non-traditional public schools. The number of participants in virtual (online only), charter (independently run) and professional (focused on specific professions) schools all increased in Massachusetts over the past year. In Martha’s Vineyard and other vacation spots, enrollment in conventional public schools has also increased, likely because affluent families have chosen to weather the pandemic in their vacation homes.

Some students may return to their old schools once the pandemic is over and education returns to normal. But some families will not want to move their children from the new schools in which they have fortunately settled. Expect enrollment in private and non-traditional public schools to remain stable. But some children are now “missing”. Of those who left the Hawaii school system in the 2020-21 school year, for example, some left the state or started homeschooling, and a small proportion went to private schools. . But 2,665 students are missing, says Mark Murphy, an education professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Learning loss will continue to be a concern in 2022, especially among younger people. Preliminary enrollment numbers suggest many of the prospective kindergarteners skipped it altogether and started grade one in 2021 (kindergarten is not compulsory in most states). This will likely have a long-term impact: High-quality early learning is associated with increased high school performance, college attendance, and adult wages. These children could find themselves lagging behind their peers for years to come.

Funding will also be a concern. In America, it’s set on a per-student basis, so every missing child means less money for school. Some states, like Florida, allow students to transfer state allocated funds to any school, public or private. Expect such ‘voucher’ schemes to be discussed more broadly in 2022.

Lack of funding could lead to a freeze on teacher recruitments and a reduction in other resources, such as teaching materials, extracurricular activities and social programs. Pandemic relief funds are stopping the bleeding for now, but it won’t last forever. Just as budget cuts reduced test scores and graduation rates in America after the 2007-09 global financial crisis, the impact of covid-19 on education will reach well beyond the end of the pandemic. .

Tamara Gilkes Borr: US Political Correspondent, The Economist, Washington, DC

This article appeared in the United States section of the print edition of The World Ahead 2022 under the title “Bottom of the class”


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Have Manatee Voters Worsened on Public School Funding? Tuesday’s tax vote will tell history https://malenyceltic.org/have-manatee-voters-worsened-on-public-school-funding-tuesdays-tax-vote-will-tell-history/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 23:16:10 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/have-manatee-voters-worsened-on-public-school-funding-tuesdays-tax-vote-will-tell-history/ School boards across the state and nation have faced hordes of angry critics, slamming policies on COVID-19 protocols and other issues. But are voters as a whole ready to fund schools? A test could take place on Tuesday when voters in Manatee County, a location Donald trump won with more than 57% of the votes, […]]]>

School boards across the state and nation have faced hordes of angry critics, slamming policies on COVID-19 protocols and other issues. But are voters as a whole ready to fund schools? A test could take place on Tuesday when voters in Manatee County, a location Donald trump won with more than 57% of the votes, decides whether to renew a property tax supporting public schools.

Manatee County voters in 2018 first passed the $ 1million tax, but by a very small margin with 51.39% in favor of the tax. It was a margin of 1,564 votes out of 56,370 cast. So, can he survive in the current political climate?

President of the school board Charlie kennedy thinks.

“There is bipartisan support for children and for an educated population,” he said. “Whether people have children in school or not, you want young people to be educated as best you can. “

The 2020-2021 fiscal year tax generated $ 47 million, the bulk of which goes to teacher salaries with a significant portion going to science, technology, engineering, and math education. In the event of renewal, a part will be reserved for the arts.

But opposition groups are campaigning loudly this year against the renewal. The Manatee County Republican Party passed a resolution formally opposed to renewal. He notes that the tax has outperformed and was supposed to bring in just $ 33 million a year, but school district leaders still want to charge homeowners a high price.

And amid COVID-19 angst, conservative parent groups have rallied more aggressively this year.

Steve vernon, president of the Lakewood Ranch Republican Club, hopes voters will nix the tax on Tuesday, and the weight of the decision will be felt statewide.

“I know the people, mainly the moms there, have never been so active politically and now they are,” he said. “They realize that the bureaucrats are taking over and don’t want to hear from the parents.

Vernon isn’t the only prominent Republican hoping the tax will drop. Sheriff Rick wells told the Manatee Patriots group earlier this month “I’m not voting for this.” He also said the district broke promises it made about how the money would be spent, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports.

County commissioner Vanessa Baugh posted a video on Facebook making it clear that she also opposed the tax.

“I am voting no on this measure,” she said. “I have the impression that we have to live within our means, and as you saw from the council of county commissioners, we gave a small decrease in our mileage. We are not asking for more money.

As for the Manatee Patriots, the group has dispatched door to door campaigning against the tax.

But just as the Conservatives are rallying against the tax, the local Democratic Party has put its ability to get the vote to profit for renewal.

Tracy pratt, chairman of the Democratic Manatee Party, said there was strong support to support teacher salaries, the rationale for the tax four years ago and today.

“It’s not a tax increase,” she noted. “It is the renewal of a tax that already existed and which has provided significant benefits to our schools and teachers.

And Democrats have worked with unlikely allies. Builder Pat neal, a major Republican donor who featured several speakers at a Florida TaxWatch event last week, supports the school tax.

“When I build and sell a house in Sarasota County, it’s a big part of the good schools,” said Neal, whose Neal Communities company is based in Lakewood Ranch. “For me and for anyone interested in economic advancement in Manatee County, I know you need good schools in Manatee County. Good teachers go to good schools with good salaries.

Kennedy suspects that there are a lot of Republicans and Independents who feel the same way Neal does, although most aren’t as loud. While the tax was first passed, the district has since successfully increased teacher salaries and performance in a statewide school grading system.

And he said the money is needed. While Vernon and others have criticized tying teachers’ salaries to a tax that must be renewed by voters every four years or less, Kennedy said there aren’t many other programs. which could be reduced if the tax ceased to exist.

“If you dive into school finances, you see that 70% of our budget is already spent on salaries and benefits,” he said. “To say just finding an additional $ 40 million over your current $ 500 million operating budget, it’s just not there.”

Meanwhile, the county sits next to the Pinellas and Sarasota school districts, which offer high salaries and have maintained similar property taxes for 18 and 20 years, respectively. Before the tax, district officials complained that good teachers would start their careers in Manatee, but quickly walk through University Parkway or Sunshine Skyway to find better paying jobs.


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Students in public schools receive free meals. But a shortage of supplies could affect this: NPR https://malenyceltic.org/students-in-public-schools-receive-free-meals-but-a-shortage-of-supplies-could-affect-this-npr/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/students-in-public-schools-receive-free-meals-but-a-shortage-of-supplies-could-affect-this-npr/ For many public school districts, meals like this Mandarin Chicken at Compass Elementary in Kansas City are the culmination of some sort of food scavenger hunt. Frank Morris / NPR hide caption toggle legend Frank Morris / NPR For many public school districts, meals like this Mandarin Chicken at Compass Elementary in Kansas City are […]]]>

For many public school districts, meals like this Mandarin Chicken at Compass Elementary in Kansas City are the culmination of some sort of food scavenger hunt.

Frank Morris / NPR


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For many public school districts, meals like this Mandarin Chicken at Compass Elementary in Kansas City are the culmination of some sort of food scavenger hunt.

Frank Morris / NPR

Students in US public schools are probably eating a lot more school meals this year.

School food was free for low-income children and some entire districts in the past, and it was available for purchase for other children, sometimes at a reduced cost. School districts are responsible for their own programs and are then reimbursed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), primarily for subsidized meals. This year, due to the pandemic, meals are free for all students, and USDA is theoretically covering the costs. But shortages cripple the program and costs rise.

These meals include breakfast and lunch, and in some areas, dinner.

But workforce issues make that livelihood hard to come by, triggering the worst supply chain problems schools have faced in decades. Supply is a nightmare. Some school catering staples, like chicken, can be hard to find, and your child’s lunch may need to be served on a plastic nacho tray lid, according to nutritionists and school district officials interviewed by NPR.

They say the work is the biggest problem. Food processing factories don’t always have enough workers to keep production buzzing, trucking companies don’t have all the drivers they need to haul food from factories, and companies that supply schools can’t. not fully stock their warehouses.

School districts are high volume, low margin customers and many of them are now scrambling to feed their students.

“It’s like a huge hurricane,” said Grennan Sims, director of nutrition services for the Hickman Mills School District in Kansas City. “And it keeps coming to us.”

The Sims distribution companies choose to serve more profitable customers rather than certain school districts. The company his district had used for years, Kohl Wholesale, began canceling truck deliveries at the start of this school year and cut ties with the district completely soon after. Other large distributors have done the same in districts across the country, leaving people like The Sims with thousands of students to feed and no clear way to buy all the groceries they need.

Grennan Sims, director of nutrition services for the Hickman Mills School District in Kansas City, is proud of the work she and her staff do to prepare meals for the 5,600 students in the district.

Frank Morris / NPR


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Grennan Sims, director of nutrition services for the Hickman Mills School District in Kansas City, is proud of the work she and her staff do to prepare meals for the 5,600 students in the district.

Frank Morris / NPR

Each meal concocted is the culmination of a sort of treasure hunt

“If you think about when the world sort of closed in March 2020, and the months that followed, and the empty shelves that were experienced, what people saw then is what we see now, but it’s just exponential, ”Sims says.

Now, every meal the Sims and their team cook together is the culmination of some sort of scavenger hunt for them. the 5,600 students in the neighborhood; a chicken volunteer van straight out of a processing plant here, a box of donated utensils there, a new supplier gradually taking over, but no certainty. And it is happening all over the country.

“We’re hearing from schools across the country that just aren’t getting the food and supplies they ordered,” said Diane Pratt-Heavner, of the School Nutrition Association.

Pratt-Heavner says some districts that scramble to feed children shop at Costco, Sam’s Club, or regional restaurant supply depots. And she says they pay more. Not necessarily more for identical items, but more money to fill in the gaps they need to complete their menu. They cannot get the same products that they were using. For example, in the Sims School District, she says the price of the chicken she can afford on a regular basis has more than doubled.

Pratt-Heavner notes that most districts haven’t fully calculated the costs, as they’re sort of in survival mode.

“It’s been so quick and furious trying to rearrange substitute items that they don’t even look at the price, it’s more about what they can get. They must have platters or main courses. or fruit or veg – they’ll order whatever it takes, ”says Pratt-Heavner.

United States Ministry of Agriculture helps absorb additional costs. The USDA reimburses districts for school meals at about 15% more than the normal price. It is announced that another $ 1.5 billion in aid is coming, but has not specified how this will be distributed. The agency is also relaxing the regulations.

But Pratt-Heavner says she doesn’t think the extra USDA money covers all of the extra costs schools incur.

Meanwhile, the USDA hasn’t released dollar totals for exactly what it all costs, in part because of the lag in information gathering.

“We absolutely want schools to serve the most nutritious meals possible. And we think they want that too, but we also believe that no school should be penalized if the truck doesn’t show up and they don’t. isn’t the fruit bowl to put on that day, ”says Cindy Long, administrator of food and nutrition services for the USDA.

There’s no relief in sight

Some wedges may have fruit, but not the cup or five-compartment tray on which to serve it. Lori Drenth, director of food and nutrition services for the Hernando County School District in Florida, said the five-compartment tray was – until recently – the staple of every meal. Normally the district processes around 5 million a year, but this year Drenth is scrambling to find replacements.

“I mean, seriously, I spend my days searching the internet for what I can put on, what I can serve, uh, menu items to students,” Drenth says.

Serving food on lids of nacho bowls, boxes of pizza slices, small deli platters and 9-inch styrofoam plates, she gets by. She says she would love to go back to the reusable plastic trays that many people remember from the school cafeteria. But even though she had the trays, she doesn’t have additional people to clean them because in addition to the scarcity of disposable food and serving items, Drenth, like many other school nutritionists, is facing a challenge herself. severe labor shortage.

“There is just endless passing,” laments Drenth. “Whether it’s, you know, paper or staff, or payroll or food, it can be exhausting.”

And there is no relief in sight. Drenth and others expect the endless chaos of tinkering with on-the-fly menus to continue at least until the end of the school year.


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Public school programs for gifted and talented people denounced as racists, elitists https://malenyceltic.org/public-school-programs-for-gifted-and-talented-people-denounced-as-racists-elitists/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 20:24:53 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/public-school-programs-for-gifted-and-talented-people-denounced-as-racists-elitists/ NEW YORK (AP) – Communities across the United States are reconsidering their approach to gifted and talented programs in schools as vocal parents accuse these elite programs of deepening racial segregation and inequalities in the education system of the country. country. A plan announced by the mayor of New York to phase out programs for […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) – Communities across the United States are reconsidering their approach to gifted and talented programs in schools as vocal parents accuse these elite programs of deepening racial segregation and inequalities in the education system of the country. country.

A plan announced by the mayor of New York to phase out programs for gifted and talented primary school students in the nation’s largest school district – if it continues – would be one of the most significant developments to date in a push that stretches from Boston to Seattle that has stoked passions and pain about race, inequality and access to a decent education.

From the start, the gifted and talented school curricula raised concerns that they produced an educational caste system in American public schools. Many exclusive programs have their origins in efforts to stem the “white flight” from public schools, particularly in the diversification of urban areas, by offering high-level educational programs that could compete with private or parochial schools.

Increasingly, parents and school boards are grappling with difficult questions about equity as they discuss how to meet the educational aspirations of advanced learners while encouraging other students so that they can also flourish. It is a dilemma that is lead the debate on whether to expand gifted and talented programs or to abolish them altogether.

“I have a burn and demolish mentality, but what are we replacing it with? Asked Marcia Gentry, professor of education and director of the Gifted Education Research and Resource Institute at Purdue University.

Gentry co-authored a study two years ago that used federal data to catalog the glaring racial disparities in gifted and talented programs.

He noted that American schools have identified 3.3 million students as gifted and talented, but an additional 3.6 million should have been designated in the same way. The additional students missing from those lists, according to his study, were disproportionately black, Latino and Indigenous students.

Nationally, 8.1% of white children and 12.7% of Asian American children in public schools are considered gifted, compared to 4.5% of Hispanic students and 3.5% of black students , according to an Associated Press analysis of the most recent federal data.

Gifted and talented programs aim to provide opportunities for students who feel intellectually limited by the education offered to their peers. Critics of the push to eliminate them say it punishes top performing students and cuts off a valuable opportunity for advancement, especially for low-income families without access to private enrichment programs.

In Seattle, a school principal who quit her job in May sought to cut the district’s Highly Capable Cohort program, as the district’s gifted and talented program is known, blaming it for causing de facto segregation. In its own recent analysis, Seattle Public Schools found that only 0.9% of black children were identified as gifted, compared to 12.6% of its white students.

The school board has approved changes that will eliminate eligibility tests and automatically make all elementary students eligible for the advanced education exam. In addition to the scores, the selection committee will consider testimonials from teachers, family members and the community.

The changes don’t go far enough for critics like Rita Green, the Seattle Chapter Education President of the NAACP. She called for more work to create environments that foster the intellectual development of all 50,000 school children in the district.

“We want the program to simply be abolished. Period. The Highly Capable Cohort program is fundamentally flawed and inherently racist, ”Green said.

Debates over admission criteria to advanced courses and elite schools predate the last national debate on racial inequalities, but have since intensified. the murder of George Floyd.

In Boston, the school committee voted this summer to expand eligibility to its exclusive exam schools and guarantee places for top performing students in poor and underprivileged neighborhoods.

Latino students make up about 42% of Boston’s 53,000 public school students – about twice as many as whites – but are vastly under-represented in advanced courses. According to the district’s account, less than 20 percent of fourth-graders invited to attend advanced work classes were Latinos, while 43 percent of guests were white.

Many children are neglected due to language and cultural barriers, said Iván Espinoza-Madrigal, executive director of Boston’s Lawyers for Civil Rights. Unconscious bias among teachers who nominate students for the program also plays a role, he said.

Elsewhere, San Francisco’s famed Lowell High School abolished entrance exams in February in favor of a lottery scheme. In Fairfax County, Va., Parents recently lost a legal offer to overturn their school district’s decision to end campus admissions testing for top-performing students in science and technology.

Most gifted and talented programs have relied on testing to determine eligibility, with some families spending thousands of dollars on expensive private tuition and specialty programs to boost scores and increase their children’s chances of securing a spot. coveted.

Controversy over admissions to higher education programs has simmered in other cities, including Los Angeles and Chicago. But nowhere has the debate been as intense as in New York, where Mayor Bill de Blasio said last month that he would start dismantling the program in primary schools, calling it “exclusive and exclusionary”.

Some parents, including Rose Zhu, called on the city to expand the program, not end it. She joined dozens of other parents outside the city’s Education Ministry building this month to protest de Blasio’s proposal to bring her 21-month-old daughter, who Zhu hopes will follow. two older siblings in the city’s gifted and talented program.

“I live in Queens and our traditional schools in our districts are not that good,” she said. “So the G and T program is the best school I can put them in. “

De Blasio’s likely successor, fellow Democrat Eric Adams, said he was not in favor of eliminating the program, which would put him at odds with some of his black voters. Adams himself is African American.

One of those constituents, Zakiyah Ansari, director of the Alliance for Quality Education in New York, wants Adams to follow through on de Blasio’s pledge.

“We believe that every child is a gifted child, every child is a talented child,” Ansari said. “We have to have people so angry at pulling out of a program that is impacting a few people and being angrier at black and brown kids who haven’t had access to a great education.”

But Gentry, director of the Gifted Education Research and Resource Institute, agreed it was time for “a revolution to address the long-standing problem of fairness” in access to gifted and talented education.

She urged parents and school administrators to do the hard work of finding a compromise.

“I’m afraid the easy way is to stop doing it,” she said. “I know that inequalities exist. But the point is, there is a huge distinction between overhauling or eliminating.


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