Public school – Maleny Celtic http://malenyceltic.org/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 11:31:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://malenyceltic.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-25-120x120.png Public school – Maleny Celtic http://malenyceltic.org/ 32 32 Meet Hamilton Public School Board’s First Female Director of Education https://malenyceltic.org/meet-hamilton-public-school-boards-first-female-director-of-education/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 11:31:50 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/meet-hamilton-public-school-boards-first-female-director-of-education/ New school year, new Director of Education at the Hamilton Public Council. Sheryl Robinson Petrazzini, who comes to the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board (HWDSB) with years of experience in the public school system and a “passion” for education, started the new role Aug. 17. director. “I’m thrilled with this opportunity,” she said. “I’m gathering a […]]]>

New school year, new Director of Education at the Hamilton Public Council.

Sheryl Robinson Petrazzini, who comes to the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board (HWDSB) with years of experience in the public school system and a “passion” for education, started the new role Aug. 17. director.

“I’m thrilled with this opportunity,” she said. “I’m gathering a lot of information…and looking to the future to see what a new vision might be.”

The Spectator sat down with Robinson Petrazzini days into her tenure to discuss her 30-year career, recovering from the pandemic and her first encounter with snow as a newcomer to Canada a while ago decades.

Responses have been edited for clarity and length.

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I have been an educator for 32 years. I started my career in Winnipeg as a teacher and taught there for three years before moving to the Toronto area to teach in the York and Scarborough school boards. I have experience teaching K-12 and have taught French Immersion and English.

I then served as a principal for 10 years, as well as a central principal responsible for school improvement, equity, and principal mentoring. I also had responsibilities in different areas of the curriculum, such as English Literacy and Early Childhood. Most recently, I was Superintendent at the Toronto District School Board (TDSB), as well as Executive Superintendent, where I was responsible for approximately 136 schools.

I was born in Jamaica and immigrated to Canada when I was eight years old. Another very important part of my identity, of course, is being a wife and a mother. I have two grown daughters, one is in Ottawa and the other, coincidentally, is actually in Hamilton. When we found out there was a manager position in Hamilton, we joked among ourselves, ‘Wouldn’t it be funny if…’. It’s no longer fun for her because I’m here now.

Q: You speak English, French and Spanish. How did you become trilingual?

A: I am someone who learned French through basic French. I wasn’t a French immersion student, but I had amazing teachers and absolutely loved it. I ended up doing a specialization at university in French and English. When I had my own children, I decided to speak French to them at home, so they are also trilingual.

I learned Spanish thanks to my husband and his family because my husband is from Argentina.

Q: What three things have you learned as a teacher that you have taken with you into leadership roles?

A: No. 1, whatever your role, we must put students at the center and remember that everything we do is to support student learning, achievement and well-being.

The second thing is the importance and power of relationships. Building relationships with students, with staff, with the community is what gets us through the good times, it’s what gets us through the tough times. We want our schools to be places where everyone, students and staff, can bring their authenticity.

The third thing is the power of public education. Throughout my career, I have worked with such diverse learners. Students come with such varying strengths and needs, and really take the time to learn who the people in front of you are so you can best meet their needs. We also need to think about our people’s strengths, needs and how best to support them.

Q: What is a memorable moment in your career and why does it stand out?

A: I’ll go back really far to 1993 when I left Winnipeg. All the students in the school from grades 7 to 9 circled around me and sang, “Here’s to you, Mrs. Robinson. I went to the ugly cry. I will always remember that.

Q: What achievement are you proud of in your last job as Executive Superintendent of the TDSB?

A: I remember a very tragic incident involving the death of a student and being able to support the superintendent, make more than one personal visit with the family and be next to the mother who had lost her child and holding her hand, without needing to say anything but simply expressing that the school board was behind the family. I take pride in the fact that I really do my best to support others.

Q: What lessons have you learned as an educator during the COVID-19 pandemic, and how will you use them in the future?

A: We learned a lesson about our strength, our endurance, our flexibility, our adaptability. We learned the importance of teaching and learning with technology, but we also learned the importance of these human connections and that these tools of teaching with technology are really important in moving the program forward and program expectations, but at the heart of education is relationships.

Additionally, the importance of focusing on mental health and well-being while continuing to help students achieve the outcomes outlined in the program. It’s neither. We’ve always known this as educators, but the pandemic has obviously forced us to be more intentional and explicit about the supports we provide to students and families.

Q: What are some of the top tasks on your list when it comes to supporting students this fall?

A: We are focused on mental health and wellbeing, we focus on using the strengths and capacity of our people to support mental health and wellbeing, but also recovery. In our recovery, we focus on and think about student learning, but we also think about leadership. We were forced to lead in a very different way. He was responsive, he was very focused on health and safety. But we’re really trying to move to a place where we really focus on learning.

Q: Your biography emphasizes a “commitment to Indigenous rights, equity and inclusion”. Tell us about how you plan to elevate marginalized groups on the public board?

A: This is one of my passions as an educator. As a racialized person, I have experienced exclusion and racism and so I have had this experience. I personally recognize that the indigenous peoples are the first peoples of this land.

We know that September 30 is the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. It’s wonderful that we talk about it and have posters and pins and all those things, but we also have to find ways to make sure that the spaces we create demonstrate that commitment and that we move from performance to performance. real integration of Aboriginal education in the curriculum and in the culture of schools.

Q: Tell us about your start at school as a newcomer to Canada.

A: I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the movie “Cool Runnings”, but I literally had this experience. I came from Jamaica to Winnipeg in December. I was so excited because there was so much snow and I wanted to touch it. It was the first time I saw snow. I ran through the airport gates and ran back. It was so cold. It was my first experience in Canada.

Being in school was different because of the language. English is the official language of Jamaica, but I also grew up in the country and we spoke patois. It was a different experience than someone who grew up in the city. I remember this feeling of not being quite in my place. I remember how it felt. And it’s also something that has pushed me as an educator to really discover the experiences of your students. What did they come with and what were their experiences before coming to see us?

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Harlem needs a parent, school and community partnership to make sounds Public School Education https://malenyceltic.org/harlem-needs-a-parent-school-and-community-partnership-to-make-sounds-public-school-education/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 23:27:54 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/harlem-needs-a-parent-school-and-community-partnership-to-make-sounds-public-school-education/ By Galen D. Kirkland I attended Harlem public schools and got an effective education at PS 197 and JHS 139 in the 1960s. I became a lawyer after earning a scholarship to Dartmouth College and graduating from the University of Pennsylvania Law School. I know from experience that public schools in Harlem can work. Yet, […]]]>

By Galen D. Kirkland

I attended Harlem public schools and got an effective education at PS 197 and JHS 139 in the 1960s.

I became a lawyer after earning a scholarship to Dartmouth College and graduating from the University of Pennsylvania Law School. I know from experience that public schools in Harlem can work. Yet, all these years later, thousands of young people attending public schools in Harlem are not getting the good education to which they are entitled. This destructive situation can be reversed through a serious working partnership between parents, schools and the community as a whole.

This essential cooperative triad can progressively emphasize central issues such as class size, adequate school staff, appropriate teaching materials, and creating a culture of love for learning. Although many public school parents actively support the schools their children attend, the sad truth is that parental involvement is woefully insufficient. There is a lot of work to be done to engage the parents who are essential for academic success. Community organizations, churches, and other non-governmental organizations can help by offering support to Harlem Public Schools in a variety of ways that will make a difference in the student experience.

For example, the Harlem Council of Elders, Inc. (HCE) offered support to PS 175, PS 197 and Junior High School 43 with a series of classroom presentations by people of various professions, assembly presentations, field trips and after-school programs. For seven years, HCE sponsored “Men Reading to Children” at PS 175 where men from a variety of backgrounds read to elementary school students and answered their questions. Doctors at Harlem Hospital taught anatomy after school with students interested in science at the same elementary school.

Community organizations can also advocate for educational justice for Harlem public schools. Over the past seven years, HCE’s advocacy has focused primarily on the New York City Department of Education’s (DOE) failure to comply with the regulations of the State of Education Commissioner of New York that require schools to provide adequate access to school media librarians in public middle and high schools. In 2015, the DOE verified that more than 77% of Harlem high schools in Districts 3, 4, 5, and 6 were denying their students access to media librarians. HCE’s most recent analysis of available pre-pandemic data indicates that nearly 90% of Harlem schools serving one or more grades 7-12 continue to violate the rights of school librarians of nearly 10,000 students of Harlem.

We all have the opportunity to fight to provide Harlem public school students with a strong and effective education. Those who choose to be passive observers of the failure of public education in Harlem are turning their backs on the young people who deserve our help. (*Galen D. Kirkland is president of the Harlem Council of Elders, Inc. and former commissioner of the New York City Division of Human Rights.)

Galen Kirkland

Galen Kirkland. Commissioner in the NYS Division of Human Rights. New York State Division of Human Rights. Bronx, New York. Among other roles, Kirkland has also served as New York State Assistant Attorney General, Tenant Representative on the New York State Rent Guidelines Board, Executive Director of the NYC Civil Rights Coalition, executive director of Advocates for Children of New York and vice president and general counsel of the West Harlem community organization. https://www.linkedin.com/in/galen-kirkland-70567218

Editor’s Note: The opinions, beliefs, and views expressed by individual authors and forum participants on this website do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, and views of The Unconservatory or the official policies of the Unconservative.

Photo credit: Tito_Puente, PS117 in Harlem, NY.

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TU ranked ninth best public school, 33rd best regionally https://malenyceltic.org/tu-ranked-ninth-best-public-school-33rd-best-regionally/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 03:12:59 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/tu-ranked-ninth-best-public-school-33rd-best-regionally/ By: Caitlyn Freeman, Editor-in-Chief Towson University is the ninth best public school and 33rd best overall in the North, according to US World and News Report. The rankings are based on 17 different metrics, including graduation and average alumni donation rates. For the regional list, TU was up against 181 other institutions and 63 other […]]]>

By: Caitlyn Freeman, Editor-in-Chief

Towson University is the ninth best public school and 33rd best overall in the North, according to US World and News Report.

The rankings are based on 17 different metrics, including graduation and average alumni donation rates. For the regional list, TU was up against 181 other institutions and 63 other public institutions.

According to the report, the College of New Jersey is the best public school in the north and Providence College is the best regionally.

In a statement, President Kim Schatzel said the recognition alluded to the recent development of the campus in terms of faculty, students and facilities.

“These recognitions represent today’s TU – a nationally recognized leader in inclusive excellence, where all students can succeed,” said Schatzel.

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Senior Lindsay Schwartz said she has enjoyed her time at TU so far and feels the location is ideal for postgraduates looking for jobs. Additionally, she said the campus culture adds to the school’s appeal.

“It’s super diverse,” Schwartz said. “You really get the full experience here. And there are so many things to do around you that you will never be bored. So I really think it’s just such a diverse place. There is something for every taste.

Similarly, student government president Jordan Colquitt said he was happy with the ranking and believes it will attract more students to the university.

“Towson continues to be one of the top public universities where student success and mobility is a key goal,” Colquitt, a junior, said in a statement. “As President of the SGA, it’s a great feeling to represent a university with such a strong commitment to helping every student thrive.”

As for other schools in Maryland, nearby Loyola University Maryland ranked fourth regionally. Salisbury University was ranked the 14th best public institution and Frostburg State University came in 40th.

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Important questions to ask when choosing a school for your child – https://malenyceltic.org/important-questions-to-ask-when-choosing-a-school-for-your-child/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 22:34:18 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/important-questions-to-ask-when-choosing-a-school-for-your-child/ Choosing whether to send your child to public or private school is a challenge for any parent – ​​how much tuition do I have to pay? Which school is my child assigned to? What is the student-teacher ratio? Here are some tips on which school is best for your child. “The main difference between private […]]]>


Choosing whether to send your child to public or private school is a challenge for any parent – ​​how much tuition do I have to pay? Which school is my child assigned to? What is the student-teacher ratio? Here are some tips on which school is best for your child.

“The main difference between private schools, whether independent, parochial or other types of private schools, and public schools, whether traditional district or charter schools, is obviously the tuition fees. says Carol Ryan, director of enrollment and advancement at Menlo Park Academy in Cleveland. “At the end of the day, what really boils down to any given family is: what are your options, and within your options, what is the community culture and approach to education and success of a school? There is no perfect school. There is simply the best fit. I think for a lot of parents, the first thing is to understand what their student needs in terms of an educational community? What is their style of learning and how do you find a fit for it?”

Choices vary

There are mainly three types of public schools that parents will notice when researching potential schools for their child. Most public schools are closed enrollment, in which the school will only enroll people who live in their district. There are districts that offer open registration. Additionally, there are charter schools, which do not receive local dollars, but are publicly funded and open enrollment. With many types of private schools, parents can find traditional, non-religious private schools; boarding schools, where students live in school full-time during the school year; or language immersion schools, where schools provide instruction in English and a second language throughout the day. Montessori schools allow children to develop natural interests and activities rather than using formal teaching methods. Specialized private schools work with students with special needs. Religious schools are also an option and can vary from Catholic schools to Jewish schools to Seventh-day Adventist schools. Finally, Waldorf education focuses on learning through the arts and creativity. The arts are used in their formal teaching methods. Some schools require an entrance exam to help schools screen potential students for admission. Not all students applying for K-12 admission to certain schools are necessarily admitted.

“Public schools serve students from a particular district and must meet local, state and federal requirements,” says Elissa Hyatt, admissions coordinator at Cuyahoga Valley Christian Academy in Cuyahoga Falls. “Private schools generally have more leeway and can make decisions independently.”

Most parents believe that the main difference between private schools and public schools is the tuition fees. Public education offers a free option, close to home, often with free transport to and from school.

Be sure to have a conversation about tuition and other expenses and figure out what’s best for your family.

Take a decision

Before choosing to enroll your child in a particular school, be sure to check with the admissions team and ask any questions you have about the school.

“The first thing parents should do is check out the website,” says Jay Fowler, director of elementary school and Montessori programs at Gilmour Academy in Gates Mills. “You can get a good idea of ​​what you’re looking for, and they usually give you important facts about this website. Then I would call the school’s main office or the admissions officer. This allows you to arrange a visit and I think is probably the best first step for any parent interested in a school. Come see the school in person and get the chance to see the facilities, get the chance to see the teachers in action and get the chance to see the students working. Just get a general vibe of what the culture looks like.

“When considering a school, attend an open house or host a ‘side’ day for your student to experience a typical school day,” says Hyatt. “Start the process early as space is often limited and applying early is in your best interest.”

It is important to take note of everything you are looking for in a school before enrolling your child.

Is your family looking for a school with a religious affiliation? Are you looking for a single-sex school? Are you looking for a school with smaller classes? Are you looking for a school that serves students with special needs? Answering these questions can help determine what is best for your child.

“What are the things I look for in a school and how can I prioritize them? Ryan said. “What are you looking for and do you think will be best for your child?” What’s good for this year, what’s good for the next two years? I think it’s important to look at how schools have performed over the last five to 10 years, but not to look at their performance over 30 years and not to look at their performance over the last three years. What you’re really trying to figure out is with their current leadership, how are they doing? The school could have been fantastic, but they started with a new chef the year before. How will this change the direction in which the school is moving? »

“I would say take a look at your child,” says Kristin Kuhn, director of elementary school admissions at Hathaway Brown School in Shaker Heights. “What do they like? What are they interested in? What type of learner is your child? Have you noticed that your child is someone who is really active and needs to be active or is your child a bit more quiet and reserved and needs more one on one the more you understand a little about who your child is i think that can then help to dictate what you are going to be looking for in a school setting. Do you want a big school? Do you want a small school? Do you want a religious affiliation? Do you want a single sex environment? Right? Do you need that school location? Is school near your work? Do you need transportation? So I think having a few of these answers in mind is a great place to start.

Consider all aspects of the school before applying. What extracurriculars are offered? How much money will be spent on extracurricular activities and supplies? What courses are on offer that interest my child? All of these issues are important to consider.

“For example, I’m going to meet families and in their local school districts, they’ve had to cut back on their music program,” Kuhn says. “So now the only way to get music is if the family has to pay extra after school or on weekends so their child can learn to play the flute, for example. I think for some families , knowing that some of these extracurricular activities that you currently pay for, you might find part of your child’s regular school day at another school is a great thing to ask when looking at schools and that one wonders “will my child learn to play a musical instrument?” ‘Will my child learn to play football or do I have to enroll him in a football league?’ “Will they get a chance to dance or have art? ‘What do you offer and what don’t you offer?’ ‘What’s going to cost me more?’

Once a parent has viewed the school’s website, visited with the admissions team, and spent time getting to know the school and what it offers, parents can then begin to apply at school. When a parent fills out an application form, it does not necessarily mean they are locked in the school – feel free to fill out the form and ask any questions that may arise while filling out the form.

“We recommend that you complete the application; there’s no harm in doing that,” Fowler says. “It gives you the opportunity to look a little closer and see if the child is the best fit, because we want to make sure that every child will succeed and follow their best educational path. Generally, when certain families have more specific questions, we ask them to fill out the form because once we know the child, the family and the situation a little better, we may be able to answer their questions a little better.

Some parents may think that sending their child to a private school can increase their chances of getting into a prestigious university. Whether your child is accepted or rejected from a university depends not so much on where your child went to high school, but rather on their individual academic achievement.

“I truly believe that all schools, all teachers, and all colleges have incredible opportunities and can provide such great roadmaps to success,” Fowler says. “A lot of it depends on the child and their own individual willingness to take advantage of what is provided to them.”

Parents may find it difficult to choose where to send their child to school. Ultimately, consider your child’s social, emotional, mental, and academic needs when choosing the best fit for your child.

“What will most prepare your child for the future they are pursuing?” said Hyatt. “What kind of community would your student thrive in? What types of teachers and administrators will help guide your student? Knowing your end goals will help you make decisions now.

“I think there’s incredible value in building a strong foundation and a love of learning and that starts at a young age,” says Kuhn. “So whether it’s a public school, a parochial school, or a private school, it’s about finding a strong foundation in which their social and emotional needs are met and valued. Just creating that level of learning and feeling comfortable with who they are as a learner is incredibly valuable. Those early years, those elementary school years are so precious to build a foundation. You’re trying to build that foundation, the social, the emotional, the academics, the love of learning and figuring out where your child can get that from.

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Miami-Dade County Public School Board Kicks Off LGBTQ Month at Fiery, Proud Boy-Filled Reunion https://malenyceltic.org/miami-dade-county-public-school-board-kicks-off-lgbtq-month-at-fiery-proud-boy-filled-reunion/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 20:49:17 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/miami-dade-county-public-school-board-kicks-off-lgbtq-month-at-fiery-proud-boy-filled-reunion/ Parents and community members exchanged blows during a spirited six-hour Florida school board meeting on Wednesday night that ended with officials voting against a resolution that would make October the month of the LGBTQ history. The Miami-Dade school board meeting was heated, with supporters pointing to the decades of discrimination LGBTQ members faced, including during […]]]>

Parents and community members exchanged blows during a spirited six-hour Florida school board meeting on Wednesday night that ended with officials voting against a resolution that would make October the month of the LGBTQ history.

The Miami-Dade school board meeting was heated, with supporters pointing to the decades of discrimination LGBTQ members faced, including during the Holocaust, and critics decrying the measure as “satanic doctrine.” Even the far-right Proud Boys have come forward to express their disgust at the proposal, the Miami Herald reported.

The district had already passed an initiative last year recognizing October as LGBTQ History Month. This year’s resolution overhauled that plan by adding key Supreme Court decisions affecting the LGBTQ community to the Grade 12 curriculum. This proposal failed in an 8-1 school board vote.

“LGBTQ is American history,” said Karry Faith, parent of two Miami-Dade County public system students and Miami-Dade County APE Board Resolution Chair.

“National PTA is “committed to creating innovative curricula…that support[s] culturally appropriate teaching and learning…so that the history of all students, including…LGBTQ groups, is accurately represented and taught,” Faith said, citing a statement from the National PTA regarding inclusivity in schools. “PTA also believes that “classrooms that celebrate diverse histories…remove existing barriers and create supportive and inclusive schools that encourage students to grow and learn in the safest and most nurturing spaces possible.”

Lucia Baez Geller was the only board member to vote in favor of Measure H-11, which would put two landmark Supreme Court cases on the Grade 12 agenda: Oberfelfell v. Hodges (2015), which protects same-sex marriages, and Bostock v. County of Clayton (2020), who found that employers cannot fire workers because of their LGTBQ status.

Ahead of Wednesday’s lengthy meeting, Geller said students could opt out of the social studies lesson, the Miami Herald reported. But that did nothing to stop meeting attendees debating the measure for more than three hours.

Scott Galvin, a former Miami-Dade student and current member of the North Miami Council, said he witnessed various social movements in the area over the years and insisted that the fight for LGBTQ progress should not be different.

“I was a young man in the early 80s when the Mariel boat lift started and hundreds of thousands of people started leaving an oppressive dictatorship just so they could find a better life,” he said. he declares. “The Anglo community I grew up in was so dismissive, so hateful. … We shouldn’t have tolerated this kind of bigoted thinking. And as you consider this article tonight, please keep in mind that the history of LGBT is the history of this community and of each one of us.

Alberto Cairo, a professor at the University of Miami, also spoke out in favor of LGBTQ History Month and teaching about historic Supreme Court decisions, saying it “does absolutely no harm to anyone.”

“At the same time, it benefits everyone,” he said. “LGBTQ history is American history. It’s like so many other stories in this country: a story of struggles, progress, and setbacks.

He added that people who object to teaching LGBTQ history are “distorting” the truth, the same way the histories of black people and Jews in the United States have been twisted.

Several audience members noted that LGBTQ people were persecuted during the Holocaust, explaining that they were ostracized when they were asked to wear pink triangles on their attire to signify who they were.

Mental health counselor and educator Lauren Shure also addressed board members, who were seated at a table displaying a National Suicide Prevention Month banner.

“LGBTQ youth disproportionately experience discrimination, violence, which puts them at higher risk for depression, suicide, and even homelessness and substance abuse,” Shure said. “Establishing LGBT[Q] History Month for Miami Dade County Public Schools provides protective factors for all young people and beyond. It sends the message that our LGBTQ communities, our neighbors, our colleagues and our youth matter, because they do.

“Having representation is important,” said Christina Ganem, president of the Gay Straight Alliance at IPrepatory Academy. “Children need to be represented. They need to know they are not alone. … Representation saves lives.

Despite a massive outpouring of support behind the measure, critics showed up in droves to rally against the initiative, according to the Herald. Some have accused it of limiting parents’ rights, being part of a “left-wing agenda” or equivalent to “satanic doctrine and satanic practice”.

Self-proclaimed taxpayer Marsha Hertig said she came forward to encourage voters to “do the right thing”.

“Don’t pass up this left-wing agenda that violates the conscious rights of students and parents of faith and their beliefs regarding … marriage and sexuality,” she told the crowded meeting.

Anthony Verdugo, founder of the Christian Family Coalition of Florida, said schools should “be neutral, objective, balanced, fair, and impartial.”

“This proposal,” he said, “infringes not only on the right to be a parent, but also on religious freedom and the protection of conscience.”

Members of the Miami Dade County Public School Board did not immediately respond to requests for comment from The Daily Beast on Thursday.

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Teachers and staff at African-American public schools in Chicago to receive settlement funds in discrimination lawsuit https://malenyceltic.org/teachers-and-staff-at-african-american-public-schools-in-chicago-to-receive-settlement-funds-in-discrimination-lawsuit/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 13:47:12 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/teachers-and-staff-at-african-american-public-schools-in-chicago-to-receive-settlement-funds-in-discrimination-lawsuit/ In 2012 and 2015, the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) and three teachers filed lawsuits against the Chicago Board of Education (the Board) challenging the Board’s “turnaround” policies and the firing of hundreds of African teachers and paraprofessionals. Americans, alleging the turnarounds had a disparate racial impact and were a pattern or practice of racial discrimination. […]]]>

In 2012 and 2015, the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) and three teachers filed lawsuits against the Chicago Board of Education (the Board) challenging the Board’s “turnaround” policies and the firing of hundreds of African teachers and paraprofessionals. Americans, alleging the turnarounds had a disparate racial impact and were a pattern or practice of racial discrimination. The Chicago Teachers’ Union alleged the board targeted schools on the South and West Sides with disproportionately more African-American teachers and staff. All the employees of the reform schools have been laid off. Yesterday, the Court issued an order granting final approval of the $9.25 million settlement of the two lawsuits.

Persons eligible to receive settlement payments are “all African American persons employed by the Chicago Board of Education as teachers or paraprofessionals, as defined in the employment agreement between the Chicago Teachers’ Union and the Board of Education, in any school or attendance center subject to replenishment, or “recovery,” during calendar years 2012, 2013, and/or 2014.”

To receive a settlement payment, Claim Forms must be submitted to the Settlement Administrator by Friday, September 9, 2022. Claim Forms may also be emailed to Attorney Patrick Cowlin at pcowlin@fishlawfirm.com or by fax at 312-205-1702. More information about the case can be found at https://www.fishlawfirm.com/ctu/.

Chicago Public School teachers/paraprofessional staff and the Chicago Teachers Union were represented by Robin Potter and Patrick Cowlin of Fish Potter Bolaños, PC and Randall D. Schmidt of the Edwin F. Mandel Legal Aid Clinic of the University of Chicago Law School.

“This has been an uphill but necessary legal battle and is part of CTU’s determination to ensure that all students and staff have the schools Chicago deserves. The named plaintiffs and other members of CTU have shown great courage throughout this 10-year fight for justice,” said Patrick Cowlin.

From 2006 to present, approximately 34 Chicago Public Schools (CPS) have undergone a “turnaround” by the board, which has fired and replaced all faculty and staff at a school, regardless of their performance. Almost all of the 34 school “turnarounds” occurred in the South Side, Southwest Side, and West Side secondary or elementary school systems, disproportionately affecting African-American teaching and staff. Eighteen (18) of these adjustments took place between 2012 and 2014.

Schools on the north and northwest sides met the board’s criteria for relief, but were not selected. According to the plaintiffs’ expert witnesses, the Board’s redress criteria (primarily standardized test scores) had a disparate racial impact and did not actually measure the effectiveness of educators. Rather, the criteria largely reflected the race and income level of the students. Additionally, it would have been better for students and far less discriminatory to invest in schools, teachers, and students instead of laying off an entire school’s faculty and staff—something the Chicago Teachers Union advocated. For years.

Racial segregation in the Chicago public school system is severe and systemic, and has contributed to the disparate impact changes caused by the concentration of African American teachers and staff in schools targeted for turnaround.

The turnarounds are an aspect of many years of school actions disproportionately impacting black teachers, staff and students. From 2001 to 2009, in a practice started by then-CEO Arne Duncan, the board closed about 86 schools. In 2012, he transformed approximately ten (10) schools on the south and west sides of Chicago. In 2013, it closed 49 other schools and transformed five (5) schools. Although the average racial mix of the population of all schools was 41.6% black, 88.6% of the closed schools were black.

CPS’s African-American faculty as a percentage of the overall faculty population has steadily declined from 40.6% in 2000 to 29.6% in 2010. In 2011, African-American faculty comprised approximately 28.7% of the tenured teaching population. As of fall 2014, of CPS’s 22,519 teachers, 24.3% were African American and 49.7% were white. Today, the percentage of African-American teachers is approaching 20%.

The lawsuits alleged that the drastic decline in the number of African American teachers corresponded directly to the intentional actions, policies, and practices of the Chicago Board of Education that eliminated, closed, combined, or reconstituted allegedly underperforming schools in the African American community.

“The Chicago Teachers Union has been an indispensable partner to our firm and our co-counsel during these cases,” Cowlin added. “These teachers and para-professionals have dedicated their lives to educating the children of the community. They deserve our support and they deserve to work in an environment free from prejudice. »

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Newark Public School students and staff return to 2022-2023 school year after summer vacation https://malenyceltic.org/newark-public-school-students-and-staff-return-to-2022-2023-school-year-after-summer-vacation/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 09:55:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/newark-public-school-students-and-staff-return-to-2022-2023-school-year-after-summer-vacation/ newark By: Tracie Carter / Richard L. Smith Thousands of Newark Public School teachers and students are expected to fill hallways and classrooms at 8:10 a.m. Tuesday, when the 2022-2023 year officially begins with the ringing of a school bell. And while some COVID protocols are in place, things aren’t as strict as they once […]]]>

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By: Tracie Carter / Richard L. Smith

Thousands of Newark Public School teachers and students are expected to fill hallways and classrooms at 8:10 a.m. Tuesday, when the 2022-2023 year officially begins with the ringing of a school bell.

And while some COVID protocols are in place, things aren’t as strict as they once were.

According to Newark Public Schools Superintendent Roger Leon, anyone entering a school building in the city must wear a mask.

The district has required masks in schools since students returned to class during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Officials confirmed that the NPS continued the mask mandate this year during summer school and programming.

According to NPS spokeswoman Nancy Deering, the mask mandate will remain in place for all 38,000 public school students and 6,000 staff in Newark, where classes are held until further notice.

Superintendent Leon also touted the success of hiring more than 600 new teachers in the district after a nationwide teacher shortage left many classrooms without instructors in New Jersey.

“Our schools cannot function without you, and our children will not learn without you. We are thrilled to have you here, and we want you to know that we are committed to making sure you know and feel how important you matter every time. I know you could have chosen any school district in New Jersey, and we are so honored that you chose Newark.

According to the Newark Teacher’s Union on July 2, 2022, in a landmark contract reopening, the Newark Board of Education and Newark Teachers Union agreed to increase the district’s new teacher’s starting salary to $62,000 per year.

Superintendent Leon asserted that the Newark Board of Education is now one of the highest-paying districts in New Jersey with incentives for both recruitment and retention.

District officials said they have also implemented several district-wide initiatives to help attract and retain teachers.

“Several partnerships with excellent educator preparation programs, such as Montclair State University and Rutgers University of Newark, help us expand the pool of teachers for hard-to-fill teaching positions such as as bilingual, ESL and special education teachers,” concluded Superintendent Leon.

Expect a soggy school community around Newark as National Weather Center forecasters forecast periods of heavy rain that could bring flooding to some areas of the city and region.

The rain is expected to continue after school hours and into the evening.

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New principal for the public school board https://malenyceltic.org/new-principal-for-the-public-school-board/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 14:52:52 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/new-principal-for-the-public-school-board/ The Keewatin-Patricia District School Board has appointed a new Director of Education. Christy Radbourne takes over from September 6. She is a long-time accomplished educator with over twenty years of experience in public sector teaching and private consulting. Radbourne most recently worked for the Department of Education as a student achievement officer, but she […]]]>

The Keewatin-Patricia District School Board has appointed a new Director of Education.

Christy Radbourne takes over from September 6.

She is a long-time accomplished educator with over twenty years of experience in public sector teaching and private consulting.

Radbourne most recently worked for the Department of Education as a student achievement officer, but she also comes from Lakehead School Board, where she spent 11 years.

She holds a Masters in Education from Lakehead University and is working on her Ph.D. jointly with Lakehead, Brock and the University of Windsor.

The KPDSB says Radbourne has created many community resources and programs in Indigenous education and cultural competency.

They add that she has presented at national and international education and mental health conferences on relationship-based education, Indigenous education, and environmental education.

Radbourne said, “I am touched and honored to join the Keewatin-Patricia District School Board and continue the great work and leadership of the staff, improving the success and well-being of every student. I look forward to working with our communities and Indigenous partners to increase opportunities and positive outcomes.

She replaces Sherri-Lynne Pharand, who held a similar position with the Lakehead Public School Board in Thunder Bay.

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Planning necessities lead to first-rate meetings between public schools for the Episcopal parish and other https://malenyceltic.org/planning-necessities-lead-to-first-rate-meetings-between-public-schools-for-the-episcopal-parish-and-other/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 21:35:48 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/planning-necessities-lead-to-first-rate-meetings-between-public-schools-for-the-episcopal-parish-and-other/ In the aftermath of his team’s 24-17 win over Aledo last Friday – arguably among the biggest wins ever for a region’s TAPPS school against a UIL program – Episcopal Parish coach Daniel Novakov has a sense of gratitude, especially for Aledo coach Tim Buchanan. “I’m grateful they played us,” Novakov said. “He had nothing […]]]>

In the aftermath of his team’s 24-17 win over Aledo last Friday – arguably among the biggest wins ever for a region’s TAPPS school against a UIL program – Episcopal Parish coach Daniel Novakov has a sense of gratitude, especially for Aledo coach Tim Buchanan.

“I’m grateful they played us,” Novakov said. “He had nothing to gain and everything to lose.”

Another reason Novakov was grateful for is that when he was preparing the 2022 schedule, he ran out of options. This planning scenario was common for Novakov and a few of his peers this offseason.

The end result has been such an impressive schedule for any program at any level for the Episcopal parish this fall. In addition to Aledo — ranked No. 2 in the Associated Press Class 5A Division I state poll and 10-time state champions — the Episcopal Parish nondistrict list includes champion reigning Class 5 A South Oak Cliff Division II State Champion, 2021 4A-II State Champion China Spring and 2021 State runner-up 4A-I Austin LBJ. South Oak Cliff is the highest ranked team in The news’ Class 5A area poll and AP 5A Division II state poll while China Spring is ranked No. 2 in the AP 4A Division I state ranking.

The only private school Parish Episcopal (1-0) will play away TAPPS District 1-I is an away game against Bellaire Episcopal (1-0) this Friday. Episcopal Parish – highest ranked team in The news’ The Private Schools Area Poll and the AP Private Schools State Poll – is aiming for its fourth straight TAPPS state title this season.

Unfortunately for Novakov, that winning reputation worked against them when it came to scheduling.

“A lot of people don’t want to play us. Often in a situation like this, a private school has the short end of the stick,” Novakov said.

Novakov said when private school programs are successful, they can struggle with the reputation that the football program is the cowbell of the school. Novakov said the Episcopal Parish does not distribute athletic scholarships and academics are highly competitive. He said the scholarships are awarded on a need basis, with a third party making the determination with blind knowledge of the applicants, not knowing whether they are athletes or not.

Novakov said schools like Aledo face similar scheduling challenges, but the overall outcome was worth it, regardless of the outcome.

“You can be in a game day environment like no other,” Novakov said.

One of the Episcopal Parish’s district rivals – Bishop Lynch – is in the midst of his own race against public schools. Bishop Lynch (0-1) fell to Hurst LD Bell last week and will face Celina (1-0) – the highest ranked school in The news’ Class 4A/3A poll and No. 3 of the AP 4A-II state poll – this Friday in Celina.

Bishop Lynch coach Brandon Moats said he was also having trouble finding out-of-district opponents. During the offseason, a scheduled opponent – ​​Cedar Hill Newman International – canceled their season and a date with scheduled rival Bishop Dunne could not be established.

Moats said he wanted to play against Celina because of her winning tradition, and his brothers rose to beat the Bobcats 40-21 in 2014. He said he was happy with his team for their efforts against LD Bell, especially since no one was injured, and the atmosphere he gave off.

“It’s a good taste of a playoff atmosphere,” Moats said. “You like when they have 100 people in their group. We don’t have that.

Fort Worth Nolan (1-0) has only played one out-of-district game against a public school this season — at College Station on Friday — but for Nolan’s coach KJ Williams, getting that game was an adventure.

“We reached out to 26 other schools for a game, including some from out of state,” Williams said.

This game would seem to be quite a challenge for Nolan. College Station (0-1) is ranked No. 10 in the AP 5A-I state poll, but the Cougars lost to Lovejoy 52-27 on Saturday at Allen and lack standout running back Marquise Collins, who suffered a season-ending injury and plans to enroll early at Duke University.

Still, this game seems to go beyond a game for Williams and some of his players. Williams played at nearby 2010 and 2011 Texas A&M and is looking forward to a homecoming.

Some Nolan players could also visit a future home. Williams said several players will remain in the College Station area with their parents or guardians. They plan to visit the A&M campus and attend Saturday’s Texas A&M-Sam Houston State game at Kyle Field.

“They get good, quality opposition in a big game atmosphere and then they get to visit where they’re going to college,” Williams said. “It could be a big trip for them.”

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Survey of public school concerns finds big gains for charters | Education https://malenyceltic.org/survey-of-public-school-concerns-finds-big-gains-for-charters-education/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/survey-of-public-school-concerns-finds-big-gains-for-charters-education/ More than a quarter of California parents moved their children to a new school during the pandemic, with most saying they wanted a different experience for their child, while being dissatisfied with COVID protocols and learning and learning supports. mental health. Charter schools saw the biggest increase in student numbers, with 23% of parents saying […]]]>

More than a quarter of California parents moved their children to a new school during the pandemic, with most saying they wanted a different experience for their child, while being dissatisfied with COVID protocols and learning and learning supports. mental health.

Charter schools saw the biggest increase in student numbers, with 23% of parents saying their children attended these schools after the change, compared to just 15% before the change. Parents were most likely to live in the Los Angeles area, followed by the Central Valley and the Bay Area. The survey also shows a 4 percentage point increase in parents who switched their children to home schooling.

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