Public school – Maleny Celtic http://malenyceltic.org/ Wed, 11 May 2022 19:13:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://malenyceltic.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-25-120x120.png Public school – Maleny Celtic http://malenyceltic.org/ 32 32 Leaving public school teachers on the rise, but education chief says don’t worry https://malenyceltic.org/leaving-public-school-teachers-on-the-rise-but-education-chief-says-dont-worry/ Wed, 11 May 2022 19:13:39 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/leaving-public-school-teachers-on-the-rise-but-education-chief-says-dont-worry/ Some 3,580 teachers left this school year. SING THE TAO sophie State schools have suffered a brain drain amid the wave of emigration as 3,580 teachers have left this school year – 70 per cent more than the 2,100 the year before – the education secretary has said Kevin Yeung Yun-hung. Schools under the […]]]>

sophie

State schools have suffered a brain drain amid the wave of emigration as 3,580 teachers have left this school year – 70 per cent more than the 2,100 the year before – the education secretary has said Kevin Yeung Yun-hung.

Schools under the direct grant program lost 470 teachers, 68% more than the previous year’s 280, Yeung told lawmaker Tang Fei of the Hong Kong Federation of Education Workers in a written response during of yesterday’s session of the Legislative Council.

Yeung said other teachers retired, continued their studies, transferred to another school, changed professions or had other personal reasons, but his office did not provide a breakdown for each. category.

“According to our observations, although the dropout rate is slightly higher this school year, schools are running smoothly overall and schools have employed enough qualified teachers,” Yeung said.

“As the school-age population declines, the demand for teachers would decline accordingly.”

Public schools hired 3,140 teachers, up 30% from 2,400 last year. Schools in the direct grant program hired 650 teachers, up 48% from 440 last year.

Yeung said the government had been careful in planning teacher training and had taken into account the expected drop in demand for teachers.

Degree programs related to teacher education funded by the University Grants Committee will admit fewer first-year students between the 2022-23 and 2024-25 academic years.

Meanwhile, Labor and Welfare Secretary Chi-kwong said authorities were not considering changing the law to deny people who emigrated their rights to receive social assistance, including including social security benefits, health care vouchers and social housing.

Lawmaker Gary Chan Hak-kan said in a written question that more than 120,000 Hong Kongers have left in the past two years while 8,700 people withdrew their benefits from the Mandatory Provident Fund due to permanent departure in the fourth. quarter of last year.

Chan asked why some people are still eligible for public benefits after withdrawing their MPF benefits.

Law replied that for reasons of confidentiality, the authorities do not have information on the number of people who continue to receive social assistance after withdrawing their MPF benefits and leaving Hong Kong.

But he said there are eligibility criteria for different government benefits in which recipients of the social security benefit scheme must live in Hong Kong for at least 60 days a year if they want to get a whole-year benefit. ‘year. They must also report to the Department of Social Welfare any changes such as an absence from Hong Kong exceeding the permitted limit, he added.

sophie.hui@singtaonewscorp.com

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Professor Aryeetey outlines 5 reasons why the quality of Ghana’s public school system is declining https://malenyceltic.org/professor-aryeetey-outlines-5-reasons-why-the-quality-of-ghanas-public-school-system-is-declining/ Thu, 05 May 2022 13:00:20 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/professor-aryeetey-outlines-5-reasons-why-the-quality-of-ghanas-public-school-system-is-declining/ Former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Ghana, Professor Ernest Aryeetey Free SHS will degrade the quality of education – Prof Ernest Aryeetey The governance system in public schools does not provide enough incentives to schools, Professor Ernest Aryeetey Government encourages public-private partnerships to improve infrastructure in public schools, Professor Ernest Aryeetey A former Vice-Chancellor of […]]]>

Former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Ghana, Professor Ernest Aryeetey

Free SHS will degrade the quality of education – Prof Ernest Aryeetey

The governance system in public schools does not provide enough incentives to schools, Professor Ernest Aryeetey

Government encourages public-private partnerships to improve infrastructure in public schools, Professor Ernest Aryeetey

A former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Ghana, Professor Ernest Aryeetey, has outlined five reasons for the decline in the quality of Ghana’s public school system.

According to him, the public school system in Ghana has been affected over the years even before the introduction of the free SHS policy, but he believes the policy has made the situation worse.

At a forum organized by policy think tank, the Center for Social Justice (CSJ), Professor Aryeetey said the Free SHS policy, which is the government’s flagship public education programme, needs of a crucial examination to live up to its objective.

Presenting the findings of the African Research Universities Alliance (ARUA), in its capacity as Secretary General, Prof. Aryeetey revealed that the poor performance of Ghana’s public school system is generally attributed to the following:

1. Inadequate investment in schools reflected in poor infrastructure, facilities and equipment;

2. Inadequate teacher preparation, often attributed to low motivation and low morale;

3. Insufficient time spent in school;

4. Schools mainly focus on passing students in exams, so no general education or critical thinking;

5. The public school governance system provides little incentive for schools to want to excel.

Commenting on the problem of public school governance, he said that currently school boards have no say in the management of their schools.

“School boards do not run the school. They do not make any major decisions. All major decisions are made by the Ministry of Education and the Ghana Education Service,” he said.

The forum, which is the 10th series of CSJ Leadership Dialogues, was themed “Ghana’s Education System: Current and Future Aspirations.” To deal with the problem of inadequate investment, which he said was one of the main setbacks, Professor Aryeetey recommended that the government adopt a public-private partnership (PPP).

According to him, the government alone cannot maintain the current arrangement to build the infrastructure of thousands of public schools across the country.

Participants in the virtual forum included a free SHS graduate, parents and teachers.

They all gave a critical assessment of the Free SHS system and called on the government to consider the many suggestions to review the policy.

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NYC public school vaccination rates released – The Ticker https://malenyceltic.org/nyc-public-school-vaccination-rates-released-the-ticker/ Tue, 03 May 2022 21:03:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/nyc-public-school-vaccination-rates-released-the-ticker/ New York City has announced that public school students ages 5 and older will no longer be required to wear face coverings. Simultaneously, the city’s Ministry of Education released COVID-19 infection and vaccination rates for schools in the five wards. Overall, 52% of New York City public school students ages 5-17 are fully immunized against […]]]>

New York City has announced that public school students ages 5 and older will no longer be required to wear face coverings.

Simultaneously, the city’s Ministry of Education released COVID-19 infection and vaccination rates for schools in the five wards.

Overall, 52% of New York City public school students ages 5-17 are fully immunized against COVID-19, with 59% receiving at least one dose of the vaccine.

The vaccine for children aged 5 to 11 was authorized in November 2021, while children aged 12 to 17 were eligible for inoculation from spring 2021. There is still no vaccine for children aged 4 years and under.

Although vaccination numbers are trending up in city schools, Department of Education data shows that neighborhoods with more people of color and conservative-leaning neighborhoods have lower vaccination rates among public school students.

For example, in Community School District 23 in Brooklyn, which includes Ocean Hill, Brownsville and parts of eastern New York, only 38% of students received at least one dose. This is the lowest rate for a school district in the city.

On the other hand, in Manhattan’s Community School District 2, which covers Lower Manhattan, Chinatown and the Upper East Side, 80% received at least one dose. This is the highest rate of any school district in the city.

Nearly 250 public schools in the city have less than a third of its students with at least one dose of the vaccine. Additionally, about 295 schools have less than a quarter of students fully immunized.

Conversely, about 140 schools have three-quarters of their student population fully vaccinated.

But even in preliminary sets of data, there is evidence that schools in lower-income areas and more people of color are getting less vaccinations.

On average, elementary schools also have lower COVID-19 vaccination rates than middle and high schools. This is partly because the vaccine for older children has been available longer than the vaccine for younger children.

There also seems to be hesitation among parents of young children when having their children vaccinated.

In New York City, 37% of elementary students, 41% of K-8 students, 46% of K-12 students, 57% of middle school students, and 68% of high school students are fully vaccinated.

A Gothamist map shows the exact percentage of fully vaccinated students in all public schools in the five boroughs.

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Calgary Public School Board to Revise Sir John A. Macdonald School Name https://malenyceltic.org/calgary-public-school-board-to-revise-sir-john-a-macdonald-school-name/ Tue, 03 May 2022 12:28:52 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/calgary-public-school-board-to-revise-sir-john-a-macdonald-school-name/ The Calgary Board of Education (CBE) is forming a review committee that will help administrators decide whether to drop the name of the nation’s first premier from a local junior high school. The board made the decision last week to strike the committee, which will review the name of the Sir John A. Macdonald School, […]]]>

The Calgary Board of Education (CBE) is forming a review committee that will help administrators decide whether to drop the name of the nation’s first premier from a local junior high school.

The board made the decision last week to strike the committee, which will review the name of the Sir John A. Macdonald School, founded in 1967, the same year the country celebrated a century of Confederation.

More recently, Macdonald’s role in establishing the country’s residential school system prompted a number of communities across Canada to remove his name and likeness from public display.

“Trustees have heard from stakeholders, including students, that it is important that we review the school’s name,” the board said in a statement Monday.

“Sir John A. Macdonald was the first Prime Minister of Canada and a complex history is tied to that name.”

The board passed the motion on Thursday. The name of this school will be reviewed by the committee “to help the board make an informed decision on whether to change the name.”

Carmen Nielson, associate professor of history at Mount Royal University, told CBC The last straight line that while MacDonald will always be known as Canada’s first prime minister, she believes it is no longer appropriate to commemorate him.

She said MacDonald had established a disastrous relationship between the federal government and Indigenous communities.

“He stood in Parliament in 1882 and promised he would keep funding at a level that would keep First Nations on the brink of starvation. We know that the results of this starvation policy have created widespread illness and death.

Nielson also noted that MacDonald made other statements that horrified other parliamentarians.

“During the discussion of the Franchise Act, he remarked on the importance of preserving the Aryan character of British North America. This word shocked many in Parliament and the Senate, as it explicitly referred to racial science,” she said.

The CBE committee will consist of seven people, including two board members, two CBE staff members, the chair of the school council, and two independent community members.

The work of the committee will consist of:

  • review and consider historical research and analysis related to the school name;
  • engage with stakeholders;
  • follow the guiding principles when reviewing and making recommendations; and
  • provide recommendations to the Board of Directors.

The final decision will however rest with the Board of Directors.

Macdonald’s name and likeness have been familiar to Canadians for generations as the country’s first prime minister and instrumental in the creation of the Dominion of Canada.

But the 19th century politician’s legacy has come under scrutiny, particularly his role in the residential school system.

Thousands of people were forced to attend schools, died there and many were abused, according to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The commission heard testimony about the effects of more than 100 years of abuse on 150,000 First Nations, Inuit and Métis children.

Schools in Waterloo, Ont., Pickering, Ont., and Tantallon, NS, are among those that recently retired Macdonald’s name.

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The Complete Guide to SIVANTHI Public School and How It Connects Students and Educators https://malenyceltic.org/the-complete-guide-to-sivanthi-public-school-and-how-it-connects-students-and-educators/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:57:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/the-complete-guide-to-sivanthi-public-school-and-how-it-connects-students-and-educators/ Sivanthi Education Group Director Sivanthi Group of Education Graduation Day Group Pic Diploma of a student of the public school of Sivanthi Chief Guest of Sivanthi Education Group A Mageshwari BA Tamil 2017-2020 batch, 4th rank holder at university level. Received reimbursement of full 3-year academic fees as a token of appreciation” — Dr. M. […]]]>

Sivanthi Education Group Director

Sivanthi Group of Education Graduation Day Group Pic

Sivanthi Group of Education Graduation Day Group Pic

Diploma of a student of the public school of Sivanthi

Diploma of a student of the public school of Sivanthi

Chief Guest of Sivanthi Education Group

Chief Guest of Sivanthi Education Group

A Mageshwari BA Tamil 2017-2020 batch, 4th rank holder at university level. Received reimbursement of full 3-year academic fees as a token of appreciation”

— Dr. M. Murugesan

CHENNAI, TAMIL NADU, INDIA, April 29, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Sivanthi Group of Educational Institutions is Chennai’s leading private educational institution, coming from a family of greats and wishing to become one.

Interest: With immense experience in the field of education and research, the Sivanthi Group of Educational Institutions has managed to connect with different people across many diverse cultures.

Desire: Everyone has the right to education. It doesn’t matter their age, nationality or gender. From the beginning of primary, secondary, tertiary and continuing education through quality research-driven institutions, we are committed to making quality education accessible to all.

Action: We will not have rest until every person is educated and empowered.

We are delighted to be a member of the Sivanthi Group of Education, whose Chairman, Sivanthi Dr. M. Murugesan, has extensive expertise in the field of education. We recently held Graduation Day, where students graduated with honors.

Sivanthi Group of Education is proud to be part of a two-decade tradition of producing doctors, engineers, CAs, and actors.

Teaching and learning methods
Problem: Most schools use outdated and ineffective teaching methods. The focus on learning is not there as the teaching methods are also time consuming.

Shake: Learning should be engaging, fun and challenging. Learning should be an experience where you can explore your potentials and become the person you want to be.

Solution: Educational technology can be used to enhance the learning process. The use of technology allows for more engaging activities, as well as less time spent on traditional teaching methods.

Introduction: What is Sivanthi Public School?
Sri Sivanthi Educational Group is approved by AICTE is a super social organization and has been registered with the Ministry of Government of Tamil Nadu and Central Council. The organization provides BEST education for children and adults with high standards.

Sivanthi Public School is a CBSE affiliated school. It provides students with the best facilities and a wonderful environment to learn and study. President Dr. M. Murugesan is considered a prestigious asset of the school. Sivanthi Public School has received several awards and trophies for its excellence in academic, athletic and extracurricular activities. He has also won numerous state-level awards in the sports division.

What are the benefits of studying with Sivanthi Public School?
Students studying at Sivanthi Public School have the privilege of being taught by some of the best teachers in Chennai. The teachers are highly qualified and experienced, which is why they can provide students with a quality education that will help them in their future careers.

Sivanthi Public School has an excellent track record when it comes to providing excellent results for its students. In the past, the school was ranked among the best schools in Chennai when it came to getting good scores in various exams like IIT JEE and NEET. Sivanthi Public School offers excellent facilities for students to enjoy music and sports. They have state-of-the-art audiovisuals and auditoriums, as well as a leafy campus. Sivanthi Public School, Chennai has been ranked among the best schools in the state of Tamil Nadu. The school is also a member of the National Conference of Progressive Schools.

Sivanthi Public School is a leading school in the state. This school has been providing quality education to students across the country for over 30 years. The school has a number of facilities that are unmatched by any other educational institution in the country.

The best thing about this school is its infrastructure. It has one of the most modern buildings in India and can accommodate over 3,000 students at a time through its sprawling campus. Classrooms are equipped with state-of-the-art technology that helps students learn better and faster.

Sivanthi Public School is an English-speaking school that follows the CBSE model. The school has an established reputation for academic and extracurricular excellence. It has a very high ranking in India and abroad.

The school offers a number of benefits for students, such as:
– A world-class education system with the latest technology available
– A highly qualified and experienced faculty
– An environment that fosters creativity, critical thinking and innovation

Sivanthi Public School is one of the best schools in Kundrathur. It has been part of the lives of many children and their parents for over 30 years now. If you are looking for an English-speaking school with an international curriculum, then Sivanthi is the perfect choice.

As one of the best CBSE schools in Chennai, we take pride in the performance of our students. Our teaching methodology is a perfect blend of theoretical and practical techniques that succeed in developing their overall personality. Classes are taught at a fast pace and students are encouraged to take responsibility for their studies. We have an excellent sports infrastructure.

Dr. M. Murugesan
Sivanthi Education Group
+91 93822 23557
sivanthicbse@gmail.com

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Three Dearborn Public School Students Awarded Marge Powell Scholarships https://malenyceltic.org/three-dearborn-public-school-students-awarded-marge-powell-scholarships/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 20:01:22 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/three-dearborn-public-school-students-awarded-marge-powell-scholarships/ The American Association of University Women (AAUW)-Dearborn Marge Powell Annual Leadership Awards were recently presented. The award includes a certificate for the recipient, a $1,000 scholarship, and the recipient’s name engraved with other recipients from their school on a display plaque for students to see. The price is not something the student can ask for; […]]]>

The American Association of University Women (AAUW)-Dearborn Marge Powell Annual Leadership Awards were recently presented.

The award includes a certificate for the recipient, a $1,000 scholarship, and the recipient’s name engraved with other recipients from their school on a display plaque for students to see.

The price is not something the student can ask for; rather, a teacher, counselor, or school principal selects someone they believe exemplifies the values ​​of integrity and community service forged in Marge Powell’s legacy.

Each high school in Dearborn is awarded with a winner each year. The awards returned after a year-long hiatus due to COVID-19 last year.

According to the AAUW, Marge Powell had a lot of fun supporting the students selected for the award. She attended ceremonies every year, even as her health began to decline until she was unable to.

Even when she couldn’t attend, she shared words of encouragement with the students through her personal comments forwarded by her friend, Valerie Murphy-Goodrich, past president of the AAUW-D.

Assma Eidy (Photo courtesy of AAUW-D)

Assmaa Eidy

Assmaa Eidy is a senior at Fordson High School. She is president of the Women’s Empowerment Club, the National Honor Society and the CommUNITY Committee. She says she is passionate about social justice and graduated last year from the youth program, Generation of Promise, which focuses on social justice and equity in the Detroit metro area. She was a youth media content creator for Focus: HOPE, of which Generation of Promise is a part. She continued her community outreach by hosting a podcast focused on social change, sharing her experience as a young Arab-American Muslim. Because of this experience, she offered to serve on the board of the Generation of Promise program.

Eidy hasn’t committed to college yet, but she has a goal for her education. Because of her passion for social justice and the leadership roles she has taken on, she plans to pursue public policy and work in the legal system or continue in community development. She indicates that she has participated in many programs with the University of Michigan, such as Dreams2Reality, Summer Youth Dialogues, and sisterhood mentorship with their empowered Arab sorority. Assmaa says, “All of these experiences have reinforced my passion for higher education and given me insight into what I would like to pursue over the next four years and beyond. »

His parents, Principal Heyam Acodray, Guidance Department Chair Jacquleline Kostovski and several other staff attended Eidy’s award presentation at Fordson High School.

In addition to receiving her award from AAUW-D on March 23, Assmaa also learned that day that she was a recipient of the Brehm Scholarship, a full commute to attend the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

Carole Wells (left) and Raya Jaber. (Photo courtesy of AAUW-D)

Raya Jaber

Raya Jaber of Dearborn High School received the Marge Powell Leadership Award on March 25, 2022. She received the scholarship in part due to her efforts as president of the student council executive council. His participation in several other high school clubs proved worthy of his values ​​upholding to receive the Powell Award.

As the student council’s executive president, Jaber learned leadership skills that she says “enhanced her ability to collaborate with other students.” More intentionally, she recognized the importance of working as a team with an eye on positive and inclusive values ​​to ensure that all benefited from the plans and activities the council implemented during this time. She will be attending the University of Michigan in the fall where she plans to continue her efforts to develop her collaboration and leadership skills. She plans to major in biology and hopes to become a pediatrician.

“I am honored to be recognized by AAUW-D, especially since the organization stands for equality and justice for all,” Jaber said.

Attending the ceremony were Jaber’s mother; and advisers Janice Fawaz, Micheal Rashid and Kassim Darwish. Also in attendance were AAUW-D members Rosa Scaramucci, Executive Vice President; Nancy Rahrig, secretary; Carole Wells, Treasurer; and Karen Monroe, Media Relations.

“Raya Jaber truly deserves the Marge Powell Award,” Fawaz said. “She embodies core values ​​and day-to-day leadership. Academically, she is at the top of her class. Raya also gives back to her community in many ways.

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Supreme Court allows Virginia Public School to maintain admissions policy for now https://malenyceltic.org/supreme-court-allows-virginia-public-school-to-maintain-admissions-policy-for-now/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 22:17:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/supreme-court-allows-virginia-public-school-to-maintain-admissions-policy-for-now/ The court rejected a request from a parent coalition to block the program while the appeal process unfolds. Justices Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas and Neil Gorsuch noted their dissent and reportedly sided with the parents. Lawyers for the school board insist the policy is “racially neutral” and aims to add more diversity to the school. […]]]>

The court rejected a request from a parent coalition to block the program while the appeal process unfolds. Justices Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas and Neil Gorsuch noted their dissent and reportedly sided with the parents.

Lawyers for the school board insist the policy is “racially neutral” and aims to add more diversity to the school.

The case under review involves a decision by the Fairfax County School Board in Virginia to revise the admissions process at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. The school – known as “TJ” – is one of the best public schools in the country. It welcomes gifted students in science, technology, engineering, and math and is one of the few regional public schools in Virginia that offers advanced study and requires students to apply for admission.

A coalition of parents said the new policy is a “racially motivated” process that negatively impacts Asian American students and was meant to make it harder for them to be admitted. After the new policy was put in place, the percentage of Asian American students who were offered places in the school rose from 73% to 54% within a year.

A district court banned the admissions policy in February, finding it violated the equal protection rights of Asian American students. A federal appeals court, however, agreed to suspend that decision.

The parents’ coalition asked the judges to lift the stay put in place by the federal appeals court. On Monday, the court declined to do so.

Under the previous policy, admissions were based on teacher recommendations, written exams, standardized tests, and essays, among other factors. According to the board, under the prior policy, students at just eight of Fairfax County’s 26 colleges accounted for 87% of the county’s share of TJ’s admitted students in the four years to 2020. In the summer of 2020 , state officials expressed concern that the school had historically admitted very few disadvantaged students.

The board overhauled the admissions process, eliminated standardized testing, and guaranteed places at TJ for 1.5 percent of the eighth-grade class at every public college within the school’s reach. It also instituted a “holistic” assessment of students that takes into consideration “experience factors” such as socio-economic background.

The council also passed a mandate requiring the use of “only racially neutral methods that do not seek to achieve specific racial or ethnic mixing, balance, or goals.”

But Erin E. Wilcox, an attorney for the Parents’ Coalition, claimed in court papers that TJ’s admissions review process was “infected with discussions of racial balance from its inception.”

She said that in the class of 2025, the first admitted under the new admissions policy, “offers to Asian American students fell 19 percentage points — from 73% to 54% in a single year”.

“All other racial groups, including white students, increased their share of offers,” she said.

This was in part because a disproportionate number of Asian American applicants and accepted students came from a handful of Fairfax County public schools, each of which often sent well over 1.5 % of its eighth-graders at TJ.

Wilcox argued that “the guarantee left only about 100 ‘unassigned’ seats for students to compete in, regardless of college, including applicants from private schools and home schools.”

“Specifically, the question is whether a school board violates the equal protection rights of disadvantaged students when it implements selective admissions criteria in an effort to produce racial balance,” Wilcox said.

Wilcox received support from Virginia’s Attorney General, Republican Jason S. Miyares, as well as 15 other states. In a friend of the court filing, Miyares accused the board of undertaking to “redo” admissions in an effort to “achieve racial balance” under pressure from state agencies and following nationwide unrest following the murder of George Floyd.

He insisted the board had replaced a “racially and meritocratically neutral admissions policy” with one “intentionally designed to reduce enrollment of Asian-Americans.”

The school board hired powerful attorney Donald B. Verrilli, who served as solicitor general for former President Barack Obama, to persuade the High Court to stay out of the dispute and allow the appeals court ruling to remain in effect while the legal challenges unfold. Verrilli argued in court documents that the student admissions policy “does not set any racial quotas, goals or targets” and is administered in a “race-blind” manner.

“Council regulators prohibit the consideration of race in admissions decisions, and all applications are anonymized, so evaluators do not know an individual applicant’s race,” he argued. . He noted that final admissions decisions are expected this month and that overhauling the admissions policy now would be “convulsive.”

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State Council Approves Public School Funding Rule https://malenyceltic.org/state-council-approves-public-school-funding-rule/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 21:29:24 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/state-council-approves-public-school-funding-rule/ BOISE, Idaho (KIFI) – The Idaho State Board of Education on Thursday approved a temporary rule extending an expired temporary rule that bases funding for Idaho public schools on student enrollment instead than on attendance. The temporary rule expired last month when the legislature adjourned sine die. Thursday’s Board action extends the enrollment-based funding rule […]]]>

BOISE, Idaho (KIFI) – The Idaho State Board of Education on Thursday approved a temporary rule extending an expired temporary rule that bases funding for Idaho public schools on student enrollment instead than on attendance.

The temporary rule expired last month when the legislature adjourned sine die. Thursday’s Board action extends the enrollment-based funding rule through the end of the 2023 legislative session.

The action was taken to stabilize public school funding, which has fluctuated in recent years across school districts and state charters as many parents choose to keep their students home due to the pandemic. Council members plan to work with lawmakers to find a permanent solution when the Legislative Assembly convenes in January.

“We have to solve the long-term problem,” said board chairman Kurt Liebich. “What we are doing is providing budget certainty to our districts and charters at a time when they need it to educate our students coming out of the pandemic.”

Another Virtual Charter School of Choice

The board directed its executive director to appoint a hearing officer to hear an appeal by Another Choice Virtual Charter School. The Idaho Public Charter School Commission recently voted not to renew the virtual school’s charter, and the school filed an appeal with the State Board. The hearing officer will hold a public hearing on the matter in the coming weeks and will make a recommendation to the Board.

Elected Board Members

The Council of State re-elected Council President Kurt Liebich and elected Dr. Linda Clark as Vice President and Dr. David Hill as Secretary. Board members will serve until April 2023.

The regular April board meeting was held at the University of Idaho campus in Moscow.

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How much did Pittsburgh Public School staff make in 2021? https://malenyceltic.org/how-much-did-pittsburgh-public-school-staff-make-in-2021/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/how-much-did-pittsburgh-public-school-staff-make-in-2021/ Pittsburgh Public Schools spent at least $303 million on salaries and other types of compensation, such as overtime, in the 2020-21 school year. The 4,676 salaried and non-salaried employees earned a median of about $63,000. Of these employees, 830 earned more than $100,000. Aggregate data provided by the district revealed gender and racial wage gaps […]]]>

Pittsburgh Public Schools spent at least $303 million on salaries and other types of compensation, such as overtime, in the 2020-21 school year.

The 4,676 salaried and non-salaried employees earned a median of about $63,000. Of these employees, 830 earned more than $100,000.

Aggregate data provided by the district revealed gender and racial wage gaps among the workforce. White employees earned about $18,000 more than black employees on average, and men earned about $7,000 more than women on average. White men earned an average of $25,000 more per year than black women.

The largest contingent of the workforce — teachers — is overwhelmingly white, with salaries set according to a pay schedule negotiated between the district and the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers.

Who was paid how much?

The former superintendent was joined on the district’s highest-paid list by several maintenance department employees, including various foremen and several electricians.

Former Superintendent Anthony Hamlet won $229,473. Maintenance department administrator Kyle Vogt was the second highest paid employee at $221,994.

Overtime pay contributed significantly to maintenance department employees who are in the top 25. The district paid $9.5 million in overtime and bonuses in 2020-21.

There were about 250 substitute teachers last year earning an average of $9,000 and about 50 full-time substitute teachers earning an average of about $26,000. The lack of substitute teachers has become a national problem during the pandemic.

Find out how much your school’s teachers, administrators, and staff earned in 2020-21. Type the name of the school in the search field below.

Editor’s note: The district provided two sets of data, one set for the 2021 calendar year and one set for the 2020-2021 school year. All data above was based on the 2020-2021 school year. All data below is based on calendar year 2021 data. PublicSource chose to use both data sets in different analyzes because the school year data contained more accurate information about the amount paid by district to hourly and overtime employees. The calendar year data contained more comprehensive information on staff job titles and where they lived and worked.

Most teachers earned between $90,000 and $110,000

The district employed approximately 1,850 K-12 teachers in 2021:

  • 86% of teachers were white
  • 70% identified as female
  • 62% earned between $90,000 and $120,000 per year.

Students in the district are 69% students of color and predominantly low-income.

Most teachers (58%) had been in the district since at least 2010. According to the union-negotiated pay schedule, it takes about 11 years to start earning the maximum base salary ($99,000).

Other income is more spread out. For example, PPS employed about 500 classroom assistants, 55% of whom are black, and almost all of them earned between $27,000 and $50,000.

Where do PPS teachers live?

PPS teachers are allowed to live out of town, unlike PPS paraprofessionals who argued for a change in their contract on this point.

Map of teachers’ places of residence:

At least 58% of teachers live outside the city of Pittsburgh. At least 15% live in cities. And for 27% of teachers, it’s not clear from their postal code.

The most popular zip codes for teachers living out of town are the Ross Township area, Allison Park, Pleasant Hills area, Coraopolis, and Bethel Park.

Staff diversity varies widely across the district.

For example, five schools in the district have majority black staff that closely reflect the district’s diversity, including Westinghouse Academy, Lincoln K-5, Faison K-5, Weil K-5, and Miller K-5. In contrast, four schools have less than 10% black staff, including Phillips K-5, South Brook 6-8, Banksville K-5 and Carmalt K-8.

Which schools have the lowest paid (i.e. least experienced) teachers?

Teachers in some schools earn much less because they are new teachers. Schiller teachers, for example, earned a median salary of $63,000 a year, the lowest in the district. Manchester K-8, Montessori K-5, Spring Hill K-5, Sterret 6-8, Westinghouse 6-12, Allegheny 6-8, King 6-8, Banksville K-5 and University Prep at Milliones had the highest salaries down in the neighborhood outside of Schiller.

Roosevelt K-5 teachers, the most experienced staff at a school that serves the general population, have an average of 21 years of experience, about three times as much as the least experienced staff at University Prep at Milliones.

Less than 5% of teachers left the district in 2021. The district administration, on the other hand, experienced an exodus in 2021. Two-thirds of the 63 employees who worked in the administration building left in 2021, and more than 85% of the 28 special education administrators no longer work in the district.

About data

The original data provided by PPS for the 2021 calendar year did not include the amount of hourly workers or substitute teachers and only provided half a year of overtime and bonus information. PublicSource negotiated with PPS to provide this additional information, but the district provided it for the 2020-2021 school year instead of the calendar year. The school year officially runs from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021.

Because the time periods are different, about 3% of PPS employees are on the new list but not the other. For these employees, we know exactly how much money they earned during the school year, but we don’t know their job title or what department they work in. We have asked the District Open Archives Manager to provide this additional information, but have not received a response.

Oliver Morrison is PublicSource’s K-12 education reporter. He can be reached at oliver@publicsource.org or on Twitter @ORMorrison.

This story has been verified by Charlie Wolfson.

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]]>
Jim Crow legacy still affects public school funding https://malenyceltic.org/jim-crow-legacy-still-affects-public-school-funding/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 11:03:32 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/jim-crow-legacy-still-affects-public-school-funding/ Almost 70 years ago – in its Brown v. Board of 1954 – the Supreme Court defined racial segregation as the cause of educational inequality. He did not, however, take issue with efforts by states to ensure unequal funding for black schools. Prior to Brown, Southern states used segregation to signify and concretely reinforce second-class […]]]>

Almost 70 years ago – in its Brown v. Board of 1954 – the Supreme Court defined racial segregation as the cause of educational inequality. He did not, however, take issue with efforts by states to ensure unequal funding for black schools.

Prior to Brown, Southern states used segregation to signify and concretely reinforce second-class citizenship for black people in the United States. Brown’s court held that segregation was inherently unequal. Even if the schools were “equalized” on all “tangible factors”, segregation remained a problem and physical integration was the remedy, the Court found.

This framing rightly focused on the immediate horror of segregation – the exclusion of students from schools because of the color of their skin – but obscured an important fact. In addition to requiring school segregation, many states also long had segregated school funding. Some had used “racially separate tax” policies that earmarked separate funds for white and black schools. Other states had transferred the responsibility and control of school funding from state officials to local communities. Local officials could then guarantee inequality without any specific law requiring it.

Brown’s focus on physical segregation inadvertently left important and less obvious aspects of local funding inequality unchecked. These practices still result in underfunding in majority poor and minority schools. Since 2021, through the Center for Constitutional Law at the University of South Carolina Law School, we have been documenting the historical connection between segregation and state reliance on local school funding. In our view, until states stop relying so heavily on local school funding, the equal educational opportunity that Brown first sought will remain out of reach for K-12 students. year in the 21st century.

What’s wrong with local funding

A great deal of evidence shows that “money matters”.

Increased spending improves college attendance rates, graduation rates, and test scores. But, as a 2018 report found, school districts that enroll “the most students of color receive about $1,800, or 13% less per student” than districts serving the fewest students of color. .

More recent analysis further demonstrated that school funding cuts during the Great Recession disproportionately affected black students and exacerbated achievement gaps.

In most US states, local school funding directs more resources to middle-income students than to poor students. (Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Most school funding gaps have a simple explanation: public school budgets are heavily dependent on local property taxes. Communities with low land values ​​can tax at much higher rates than others, but still fail to generate the same level of resources as other communities.

In fact, in 46 out of 50 states, local school funding programs generate more resources for middle-income students than for poor students. The local funding gap between districts serving mostly middle-income students and poor students in New Jersey, for example, is $3,460 per student. While state and federal programs often send additional funds to poor students, they are insufficient to fully meet the additional needs of low-income students.

Missed opportunities to address local financing

In Brown v. Board, the court glossed over the history of school segregation and its nuances. The court said it was impossible to “go back to 1868”, when the nation passed the Fourteenth Amendment, or “even to 1896”, when the court authorized segregation. Instead, he said “we must view public education in light of its full development and present place in American life across the nation.”

This pivot allowed the court to tackle segregation on a slate cleaned of the mess of history. But it also deprived the court of any serious consideration of the complex and racist local school funding system in the Southern states.

Subsequent court rulings have not even acknowledged that a local funding problem may exist. On the contrary, they favor local financing rather than the correction of inequalities. In the 1973 case of San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez, the court dismissed a challenge to causes of unequal local school funding, finding that “local control” over school funding was “essential to the continued public support of schools” and “of paramount also educational.

A year later, in Milliken v. Bradley, the Supreme Court blocked a desegregation appeal that would have covered multiple districts. Finances and local autonomy were at the heart of the court’s logic. He wrote, “No tradition in public education is more deeply rooted than local control over the operation of schools.” In his view, desegregation between districts would destroy this tradition and create a host of problems regarding the funding of local schools.

Of course, these decisions did not prevent desegregation within individual districts. But the Court said the desegregation and school funding inequality that occurs between school districts — as opposed to within school districts — is largely beyond the reach of the federal judiciary.

Funding, control and segregation

Our research reveals that during the rebuilding of the South, progressive blacks and whites saw state control as the solution to inadequate and unequal education. They have enacted policies to this effect, many of which have been enshrined in state constitutions rather than in laws reversible by the legislature.

Local communities were certainly important to school implementation, but states like Texas and Virginia centralized school administration, school funding, and a variety of other policies. Some states, like South Carolina, have brought the core issue of physical segregation under state control and outright banned it.

Then, during the Jim Crow era, localism became the tool to reverse that progress and equality. States increased their reliance on local taxation, gave local white officials discretion over public funds, and constitutionally guaranteed segregation. Some went so far as to develop color-coded funding systems where white taxes exclusively funded white schools.

Others, like South Carolina, achieved the same goal by letting taxpayers choose which of the separate schools would receive their funds. Southern leaders have openly tied local financing and control to the “wisdom” of segregation.

The development of local northern school systems was historically distinct. Yet even in some northern states, racial antagonisms and concerns about segregation have driven local decision-making. More generally, some northern states have followed a similar trajectory as southern states: Illinois, for example, imposed a statewide property tax for white education with additional local funding before the civil war. Ironically, however, it eventually became one of the states most dependent on local funding.

Towards a fairer system

While Brown v. Board declared school segregation itself unconstitutional, other related aspects of segregated schools – particularly the decentralization of school funding – continued unchecked after this. The longer these aspects lasted, the more the courts accepted them as a neutral aspect of the provision of public education.

[Over 150,000 readers rely on The Conversation’s newsletters to understand the world. Sign up today.]

An important step in addressing entrenched school funding inequities is to first recognize that they are rooted in the history of Jim Crow segregation. Another potential step is to return to the more centralized approach to reconstruction – an approach that states during their progressive eras have long recognized. And this step also makes good constitutional sense. After all, every state constitution places the ultimate obligation to fund and deliver public education on states, not local governments.The conversation

Derek W. Black is a professor of law and Axton Crolley is a constitutional law scholar at the University of South Carolina.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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