Skip to main content
Category

University

Limit Delhi University next week, know best of four formula, point deduction rules

By University

The University of Delhi (DU) is expected to publish its first cut-off list by October 1. The admissions and limits schedule is expected to be released this week. DU admissions for most undergraduate courses are based on grade 12 merit. The university takes into account the ‘best of four’ formulas, which means that the percentage of the four highest scoring subjects of class 12 is taken into account for admissions. This is also known as the best of the four formulas.

As a general rule, while choosing the best of the four, applicants should select four subjects – one in language and three best academic subjects. It must also include the subject for which the student wishes to be admitted.

For example, if a student is applying for a BA (Honors) in a language subject, the particular subject and three other elective courses should be considered for the best of four. If he / she has not studied a language at the level of the qualifying examination and seeks admission to a specialized course in that language, a deduction of 5% will be imposed on the overall percentage of the “best four”.

For the other specialization courses, one linguistic subject and three other subjects, which must include the subject for which one is applying, will be considered as “the best of the four”. However, depending on the specialization of the course, students who have added the relevant grades from the subject of Class 12, up to 2.5 percent of the points will be deducted from the total percentage.

There are some subjects for which applicants may not have taken the relevant course. This includes Applied Psychology and BA (Hons) Psychology, for which Psychology will be considered, for BA Social Work (Hons) and BA (Hons) Philosophy, no specialized subject will be considered, for BA (Hons) in economics, students must have completed mathematics in 12th grade.

While for most courses, if a student includes a course other than those listed by DU, points are deducted, however, for the BA program, students can include those subjects without any deduction. If more than one non-listed subject is included in the calculation of the “best four”, a deduction of 2.5% each in the “best four” may be taken.

For vocational subjects, one language, mathematics and two related vocational subjects will be taken into account. If a candidate has added a professional course, a two percent advantage will be given in “best of four”, while those who have studied more than one related professional subject will be awarded an additional one percent point.

For BCom (Hons) / BCom, the must include one linguistic subject and three other subjects which must include two: mathematics, business mathematics, accounting, economics and business studies or commerce. Inclusion of any other subject, apart from these, one percent will be deducted. If a student adds another language subject, 2.5 percent of the points will be deducted.

Read all the latest news, breaking news and coronavirus news here

Source link

Hamdan Bin Mohammed Smart University signs memorandum of understanding with Egypt …

By University

(MENAFN-Mid-East.Info) Hamdan Bin Mohammed Smart University recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with SMART Company for Modern Education Services, owned and operated by the International Digital University (IDU) of Egypt. The partnership was formalized following a visit by a group of IDU delegates to HBMSU to explore prospects for cooperation in the development and improvement of academic, training and joint research programs.

HE Dr Mansoor Al Awar, Chancellor of HBMSU, as well as several officials of HBMSU, received the IDU delegation led by Professor Hossam Badrawi, co-owner of Smart Modern Educational Services, and Dr Reham Mohsen, CEO of Smart Education and Executive Director of the International Digital University.

During the meeting, the heads of the two institutions reviewed and formally approved the scope of the partnership as set out in the Memorandum of Understanding. This partnership represents the first of HBMSU’s partnerships with private sector institutions outside the UAE. The terms of the MoU cover areas related to joint academic and research work and professional development programs on the latest concepts in education and the best methodologies for skills development, training and scientific research. The two sides also agreed to further cooperation in the implementation of the “Professional Diploma – Customer Service Excellence – 7 Star Criteria” program in Egypt. It will be the first program of its kind to develop the capacities of employees in governments to improve their customer service skills.

HE Dr Mansoor Al Awar expressed his appreciation for the academic cooperation formed with the IDU, which demonstrates the confidence of various educational institutions in the role of HBMSU in advancing the digital transformation of Arab universities and in the lays the foundations for intelligent learning in the Region. He added that this partnership affirms the important achievements of the university in the field of training and qualification of human resources of a generation capable of advancing sustainable development.

Dr Al Awar further noted the role of the partnership in deepening the strong fraternal relations and historic ties between the UAE and Egypt and in expanding cooperation in the field of knowledge and development. education, while opening more channels for exchanging experiences in vocational and institutional training.

Al Awar added, “Our university has set its strategic goals for the next three years, and one of its main goals is to promote the digital transformation of Arab universities. Therefore, we will continue to share our pioneering experiences to reshape the future of education and establish an integrated education system that adopts the latest digital transformation to meet current needs. We continue to strengthen the adoption of hybrid and flexible education systems, innovation in knowledge and forecasting trends as an essential foundation for the dissemination of an educational, intellectual and cultural system capable of adapting to emerging needs and to pave the way for a transformation towards a more integrated and comprehensive educational environment. We are confident that concerted efforts within academia and strengthening partnerships with vocational and skills training institutions will bring about the desired positive change in knowledge and education at regional and global levels. It will also provide Arab youth with tools that will ensure their academic and professional success in the current era of technological developments based on digital transformation and artificial intelligence.

Professor Hossam Badrawi said: “The MoU helps to realize the vision of the International Digital University and the SMART Company for modern educational services to renew and update our education methods. Using the most advanced teaching strategies and methodologies and highly experienced and internationally trained academics, we hope to keep pace with modern educational developments.

“The cooperation between HBMSU and IDU aims to advance higher education and provide learners around the world with the opportunity to study advanced modern science and arts using the latest technology and with experts in various fields,” said he added.

The International Digital University follows an approach based on providing educational programs that meet the highest international quality standards for local and international students at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. IDU adopts blended learning as the primary method of study, the bulk of educational activities are delivered digitally and face-to-face participation minimal.

The partnership with IDU is the latest addition to HBMSU’s range of strategic partnerships as it continues to expand its cooperation in the Arab region. These partnerships include leading educational institutions, international organizations and major global technology organizations that aim to expand links for cooperation in education and knowledge; improve human intellectual and cultural communication; and stimulate economic and social development based on avant-garde education.

MENAFN21092021005446012082ID1102836364

Legal warning: MENAFN provides the information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We accept no responsibility for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licenses, completeness, legality or reliability of the information contained in this article. If you have any complaints or copyright issues related to this item, please contact the supplier above.

Source link

Galgotias University faculty receives prestigious Dr APJ Abdul Kalam Teacher Excellence Award 2020

By University

By a correspondent

Professor Ishrat Naaz of Galgotias University received the prestigious 2020 Dr APJ Abdul Kalam Teacher Excellence Award (Courtesy Indian Council for Technical Education, AICTE), Shikshak Kalyaan Foundation for its contribution to the national education policy 2020 by making AtmaNirbhar Bharat in the field of education.

The main guests of the four-day conclave for the celebration of National Teachers’ Day 2021 included Prof. Anil D Sahasrabudhe, President of AICTE, Prof. Najma Akhtar, Vice-Chancellor, Jamia Millia Islamia, Mr. Firoz Bakht Ahmed, chancellor, Maulana Azad National Urdu University, Prof. Syed Ainul Hasan, Vice Chancellor, Maulana Azad National Urdu University, Prof Syed Ainul Hassan, Vice Chancellor, Maulana Abul Kalam National Urdu University Prof (Dr.) JK Saini, Vice Chancellor, Netaji Subhash University of Technology, Prof (Dr ..) K Ratnam, Member Secretary, Indian Council of Historical Research, New Delhi.

Recently, she also won the “Young Researcher Award 2020” from the Institute of Scholars (InSc), registered with the Ministry of MSME, Government of India and the “Best Women Faculty Award 2020-2021” from the Novel Research Academy of India. Ministry of MSMEs, Government of India.

Dr Naaz was one of the speakers at the four-day Laureates Conclave organized by the Shikshak Kalyaan Foundation in association with AICTE. She expressed her point of view on the importance of the role of a teacher in the independence of India. She urges, as highlighted in NEP 2020, that “teachers really shape the future of our children – and, therefore, the future of our nation”, implying that teachers play the most important role in the future. nation building by creating high quality human resources in their classrooms. Teacher education is vital to creating a pool of teachers who will shape the next generation. Thus, the preparation of teachers is very crucial to make India a self-sufficient guru and Vishwa.

She accepted the award on behalf of the entire teaching fraternity working through teachers online, offline, virtual or in the classroom – the true nation builders who work tirelessly 24/7, 365 days to make India Atmanirbhar!

She also spoke at length so that teachers had a knowledge of multiple languages, new age courses like computer thinking, coding and professional education. She insisted on how teacher educators should prepare such a workforce of teachers with all the skills and pedagogy that meet the current demands of the time.

She spoke of the main challenge that educational institutions have to overcome, for the successful implementation of PEN, is the prevailing mindset today among key stakeholders such as students and parents, that vocational education is inferior to ordinary school and college education and only suitable for those young people who are unable to cope with mainstream education.

She showed her concern that schools have failed to overcome this stigma over the past three decades for several reasons. She urges management and teachers, especially in schools and colleges, to overcome their lack of know-how in providing vocational education and to embrace the task of integration with enthusiasm and commitment.

Source link

13 unique places to discover at the VIU | Vancouver Island University

By University

With over 120 programs to choose from, ranging from trade certificates and diplomas to undergraduate and graduate degrees, it’s safe to say that there are plenty of opportunities to experience a variety of places, courses and backgrounds. connections to VIU.

And whether you’re a new student looking to experience all that this place has to offer, or you’re a returning student who just needed a quick reminder of what’s on offer, there is no shortage of unique places. no, whatever happens you are looking for. While many of these locations are located on VIU’s main campus in Nanaimo, we’ve included a few facts about our other campuses and facilities as well.

The upscale restaurant

The Nanaimo area has no shortage of delicious choices when it comes to dining options and that includes the fine dining establishment here at VIU, known as The Discovery Room. VIU’s full-service learning restaurant connects students with customers in the community. Learning by doing, hospitality management and culinary arts students provide a contemporary culinary experience. The menus change weekly and are generally updated every Monday for the upcoming week’s service.

The fully equipped theater

Located in building 310, VIU’s 300-seat Malaspina Theater serves as an educational theater for budding artists and hosts a variety of events throughout the year, most of which are hosted by students and faculty. Past performances have included plays and theatrical productions, film screenings, poetry readings, burlesque shows, orchestral ensembles and musicals.

Koi pond

Located in Tamagawa Gardens (next to Building 340), Koi Pond is a favorite spot for those looking for an oasis of calm and peace on campus. Around the pond, the traditional Japanese garden is home to a wide variety of trees, shrubs and flowers. Designed by Japanese garden specialist Roy Tanaka, the gardens were donated by Tamagawa University in Tokyo and were inaugurated in 1979. The pond koi were donated by CUPE Local 1858, Mr. and Ms. RH Sage and Joel Southward.

Art gallery

Adjacent to the Visual Arts Building is the View Gallery, designed and run by professors from the Department of Art and Design. The gallery organizes contemporary art exhibitions by international, national and student artists for the university and the local community. The gallery also serves as the annual student exhibition venue and is an important part of the visual arts curriculum and the student experience of campus life.

Shq’apthut – VIU Indigenous Gathering Site

A home away from home for First Nations, Status, Non-Status, Métis and Inuit students, Shq”apthut – VIU’s Indigenous Gathering Place on the Nanaimo Campus is home to Indigenous Student Services (SAS). All members of the campus community are welcome at Shq’apthut, and Alumni in Residence are available five days a week to help you with questions that arise at every stage of your student experience. Shq’apthut is also a place where cultural, academic, recreational and social activities are promoted and celebrated. There are many parties, success workshops and other community events that all students are encouraged to[participatethroughouttheyear[participateinthroughouttheyear[participertoutaulongdel’année[participateinthroughouttheyear

Dental clinic

Need to have a dentist appointment, but you don’t know where to go? Why not check out the cost effective VIU campus dental clinic? All treatments are provided by dental students supervised by licensed professors and dentists. To become a client, call the clinic at 250-740-6240.

The automotive shop

Is your vehicle making a funny noise? Are you finding it increasingly difficult to walk up Fifth Street all at once? Why not take your vehicle to the campus auto shop and let the automotive students take a look? All work is inspected by an instructor, and any safety related work (such as brakes, steering, etc.) is road tested by the student or students who have worked on the vehicle and an instructor or a workshop technician.

Hair salon

The Hairdressing Program at Vancouver Island University’s Nanaimo Campus operates a salon as part of the program. The salon is open Monday through Thursday for hairstyling services and the purchase of hair products. From time to time, the show will offer promotions on the products they offer. VIU employees and the general public are always welcome to visit the salon during opening hours to purchase salon products or to make an appointment for services.

The wooded area

Take a little trip “on the island?” Why not stop at the 70-acre wooded estate known as Milner Gardens? The estate is just a 40-minute drive from the Nanaimo Campus in the town of Qualicum Beach. The property was purchased by Ray Milner in 1937, who began establishing the garden with his first wife until his death in 1952. Work continued on the garden after Ray married his second wife Veronica in 1954. The estate was acquired by VIU in 1996. In May of the same year, the garden was officially consecrated as “Milner’s Gardens”, in homage to Ray and Veronica. VIU’s goal is to maintain the garden in perpetuity for educational purposes, as well as for the benefit of the community.

The beauty salon

Located in Parksville, the VIU Spa Institute is an educational school that offers esthetic and manicure services. All services are performed by students in training under the supervision of certified instructors in aesthetics and nail technology, using only professional products. VIU employees, friends and family and the general public are always welcome to the salon during opening hours to make appointments for services. Gift certificates are available.

The LEED® certified campus

Located about a half hour drive south of the VIU Nanaimo campus is the VIU Cowichan campus in the town of Duncan. Designed to LEED Gold standards, the comprehensive educational institution offers a wide range of academic, applied, vocational, technical, vocational and development programs. During the day, 90% of the building’s lighting is provided by natural daylight, and over 90% of the building’s roof is also a green roof. Green roofs are engineered systems that incorporate vegetation on top of traditional roofs.

The marine research station

Located in Bowser, British Columbia, on the shores of the Baynes Strait, the Deep Bay Marine Research Station is a key research facility for the University of Vancouver Island. The station conducts applied research for the shellfish industry and educates the public about this important part of the BC economy. It also has flexible wet and dry laboratory spaces with access to standard analytical systems and equipment, salt water flowing directly from Baynes Strait, collected to a depth of 40 or 80 feet at dead tide, on 11 ha. marine research shellfish farm comprising both intertidal and deepwater leases, and two marine research vessels and equipment.

The former primary school turned university campus

In 1974, VIU – then Malaspina College – took over responsibility for continuing education courses that were offered by the Powell River School District. At first, classes, which were offered only in the evening, were held in a small white storefront on Marine Avenue in the city center. When the college received funds to run adult basic education day classes, a new campus opened in the centennial building next to the city museum. The new building featured offices and three classrooms, although classes were also held at local elementary schools and hotels. In 1983, the campus finally moved to a space that could accommodate the growing number of students and staff – the former Gordon Park Elementary School. The school was leased to the district and originally had 14 classrooms. Five years later, an indoor play area was converted into more classrooms and a new entrance, with a staff room, meeting room and main office was added. In 2004, the campus was purchased from the school district and air conditioning, new flooring and new lighting were installed.

VIU experience

Looking to learn and discover even more about Vancouver Island University on your own? Don’t miss the Experience VIU live virtual event, which takes place on Saturday, October 2. Anyone interested in post-secondary education can attend, from high school students and their parents to those who have been out of school for a while and are ready. to explore their options. While things are still a little different this year, you can still find the information you need to help you choose a program, explore the many services and supports available to you as a student, and get answers. to your questions.

Source link

Hamdan Bin Mohammed Smart University signs MoU with Egyptian company SMART

By University
  • Mansoor Al Awar: We will continue to unify our efforts to promote the digital transformation of Arab universities, as well as to enable the academic, research, social and business sectors to keep pace with the rapid technological developments occurring across the world. .
  • The partnership is an important step towards deepening brotherly relations and historic ties between the UAE and Egypt and expanding cooperation in the fields of knowledge and education.

Hamdan Bin Mohammed Smart University recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with SMART Company for Modern Educational Services, owned and operated by the International Digital University (IDU) of Egypt. The partnership was formalized following a visit by a group of IDU delegates to HBMSU to explore prospects for cooperation in the development and improvement of academic, training and joint research programs.

HE Dr Mansoor Al Awar, Chancellor of HBMSU, as well as several officials of HBMSU, received the IDU delegation led by Professor Hossam Badrawi, co-owner of Smart Modern Educational Services, and Dr Reham Mohsen, CEO of Smart Education and Executive Director of the International Digital University.

During the meeting, the heads of the two institutions reviewed and formally approved the scope of the partnership as set out in the Memorandum of Understanding. This partnership represents the first of HBMSU’s partnerships with private sector institutions outside the UAE. The terms of the MoU cover areas related to joint academic and research work and professional development programs on the latest concepts in education and the best methodologies for skills development, training and scientific research. The two sides also agreed to further cooperation in the implementation of the “Professional Diploma – Customer Service Excellence – 7 Star Criteria” program in Egypt. It will be the first program of its kind to develop the capacities of employees in governments to improve their customer service skills.

HE Dr Mansoor Al Awar expressed his appreciation for the academic cooperation formed with the IDU, which demonstrates the confidence of various educational institutions in the role of HBMSU in advancing the digital transformation of Arab universities and in the lays the foundations for intelligent learning in the Region. He added that this partnership affirms the important achievements of the university in the field of training and qualification of human resources of a generation capable of advancing sustainable development.

Dr Al Awar further noted the role of the partnership in deepening the strong fraternal relations and historic ties between the UAE and Egypt and in expanding cooperation in the field of knowledge and development. education, while opening more channels for exchanging experiences in vocational and institutional training.

Al Awar added, “Our university has set its strategic goals for the next three years, and one of its main goals is to promote the digital transformation of Arab universities. Therefore, we will continue to share our pioneering experiences to reshape the future of education and establish an integrated education system that adopts the latest digital transformation to meet current needs. We continue to strengthen the adoption of hybrid and flexible education systems, innovation in knowledge and forecasting trends as an essential foundation for the dissemination of an educational, intellectual and cultural system capable of adapting to emerging needs and to pave the way for a transformation towards a more integrated and comprehensive educational environment. We are confident that concerted efforts within academia and strengthening partnerships with vocational and skills training institutions will bring about the desired positive change in knowledge and education at regional and global levels. It will also provide Arab youth with tools that will ensure their academic and professional success in the current era of technological developments based on digital transformation and artificial intelligence.

Professor Hossam Badrawi said: “The MoU helps to realize the vision of the International Digital University and the SMART Company for modern educational services to renew and update our education methods. Using the most advanced and highly experienced and internationally educated teaching strategies and methodologies, we hope to keep pace with modern educational developments.

“The cooperation between HBMSU and IDU aims to advance higher education and provide learners around the world with the opportunity to study advanced modern science and arts using the latest technology and with experts in various fields,” said he added.

The International Digital University follows an approach based on providing educational programs that meet the highest international quality standards for local and international students at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. IDU adopts blended learning as the primary method of study, the bulk of educational activities are delivered digitally and face-to-face participation minimal.

The partnership with IDU is the latest addition to HBMSU’s range of strategic partnerships as it continues to expand its cooperation in the Arab region. These partnerships include leading educational institutions, international organizations and major global technology organizations that aim to expand links for cooperation in education and knowledge; improve human intellectual and cultural communication; and stimulate economic and social development based on avant-garde education.

-Ends-

For more information, please contact:
Orient Planet Group (OPG)
Phone. : +971 4 4562888
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.orientplanet.com

© Press release 2021

Source link

Do athletes have to choose between university and stadium? – Living in Switzerland Guide

By University

One third of Swiss athletes who took part in the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 were students or university graduates. Outside the stadium, it is “normal” students who have to juggle between lessons and high-level sports training.

According to a new study “Elite Sport in Switzerland 2019”, 47% of athletes aged 25 to 34 have a higher education diploma (from a university or a vocational high school). That’s 5 percentage points lower than the rest of the population in the same age group. But it’s still a fairly high figure, explains Simon Niepmann, a former rowing champion who heads the “Elite Sport and Studies” program for Swiss Olympic, the umbrella organization for Swiss sport. An Olympic gold medalist himself, he managed to successfully complete his studies in sport and geography at the University of Basel, earning a bachelor’s degree in five years instead of three.

As its name suggests, the support program it runs aims to enable athletes to embark on a dual career. As part of the program launched in 2014, a network of 42 people is responsible for helping athletes reconcile the demands of competitive sport with their studies. These contact persons are located in almost all Swiss universities and help athletes plan their studies and their sports career years in advance.

“Elite sport and studies”

In 2014, Swiss Olympic launched the “Elite Sport and Studies” project in collaboration with Swiss University Sports – the umbrella organization of university sports clubs. The project became a program in 2017 and has been affiliated with Swiss Olympic since 2018. Swiss Olympic and Swiss University Sports have a close cooperation on this issue.

Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities – the conference of rectors of Swiss universities – signed a declaration in 2017. Their main objectives are to promote optional part-time studies, to lengthen courses and to reduce attendance requirements for athletes from competition.

In 2020, the two organizations signed a second declaration, adding the option of distance learning independent of time and place, which worked well with the study conditions imposed by the Covid.

SWI swissinfo.ch: Why was there hardly any organized support in Switzerland for student-athletes until a few years ago?

Simon Niepmann: In the past, student-athletes were extremely autonomous. During my studies, I noticed that in Switzerland, no difference was made between students who practiced elite sports, those who practiced a hobby or those who had a job in parallel with their course. All were considered part-time jobs. It was entirely up to the athletes to organize the time needed to train for their sport in addition to their studies.

In Switzerland, sport is now seen more and more as a full-time professional activity, even if its status is not yet comparable to that of other countries, where being a sportsman is considered as a profession like any other.

SWI: What is the question that young athletes ask you most often?

SN: The most frequent question is: “I play high level national or international sport. What type of diploma training is an option for me?

Of course, I cannot give a general answer, because all athletes can study business or law. I have to look at each case individually. It depends on the field of study that the athletes are interested in, the demands of their sport, but also where they train and the flexibility offered by the university concerned.

SWI: What is the main support you can offer to student-athletes?

SN: Advance planning. This means starting at an early age to combine competitive sports and study. For example, it is necessary to identify the phases where the studies will require a lot of time and the phases of intensive training.

Ideally, schedule a schedule until graduation – the schedule can be readjusted every six months.

Our main task is to make athletes aware that they have to plan and that there are different people who can help them on their two-lane journey.

SWI: An analysis of the Swiss Olympic study in 2018 shows that top student-athletes are rarely registered as sportsmen or sportswomen when they are admitted to university.

SN: We are faced with two problems. On the one hand, we do not have access to information on all athletes regarding their education; on the other hand, universities do not always know which students are involved in competitive sports. We have a lot of room for improvement in this area.

What we try to do is keep competitive athletes informed, as often and as widely as possible, whether through newsletters, sports clubs or other channels.

We have also noticed that there is often a desire for discussion between student-athletes and young athletes still in high school. If athletes are talking to each other, there is less inhibition in asking simple questions than if they are talking to someone from a college official. We have created an online platform to facilitate this exchange.

SWI: The 2020 statement from Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities makes it clear that not all sports are compatible with all training courses. Which sports-study combinations are particularly difficult?

SN: I would hesitate to say that a certain sport does not work at all with a certain university subject, because it is always important to take into account that it is a very personal choice.

But we notice that winter sportsmen tend to study at a distance. The point is, they’re on the road all season, so they can’t regularly attend a class in person.

In terms of subjects, the most difficult for athletes are certainly those where there is a high proportion of practical work or laboratory lessons where students have to be in a certain place at a certain time.

SWI: The United States and China have long been at the top of the Olympic Games medal rankings. In China, for example, competitive athletes have the opportunity to focus on sports and then obtain favorable conditions for admission to a prestigious university. Are Swiss athletes at a disadvantage compared to competitors from these countries because they are forced to combine studies and sport?

SN: We believe that in a number of cases it is useful for athletes to train alongside their studies. Partly because there are a number of hours in the day that are not devoted to sport and where athletes can do other things, and also because studying is a cognitive distraction that motivates athletes to a higher level. different way.

An environment outside of the sporting world is also important for many athletes. It allows for a change of pace and can be rewarding and calming. Preparation for a post-sports career is also a very important point. When you stop playing sports, it is essential to have a second place to invest your energy and develop.

SWI: How does Switzerland rank in a global comparison in terms of support for student-athletes?

SN: We prefer to compare ourselves to countries of similar size. There are always different approaches. In Norway, sports associations collaborate with specific universities. So there you know more or less that if you play a certain sport, there is a university that cooperates with the national association or the Olympic committee.

With our network of coordinators in Switzerland, we want to show that athletes do not have to limit their options. We prefer to try to keep all options open. It is a process that we will continue to work on.

SWI: Is a dual career in competitive sport and school more a story of compromise, or a win-win situation?

SN: It’s definitely a compromise because you can’t commit 100% to sport and 100% to your studies at the same time. You have to plan and find a balance. Still, I wouldn’t say it devalues ​​both aspects. Studying at the same time doesn’t necessarily mean less success in sports – it often even means the opposite.

Source link

SDL Surveying Partners with University for Learning Program

By University

The national home survey and assessment company, SDL Surveying, has released details of its new apprenticeship program which is run in conjunction with Nottingham Trent University.

The Level 6 Chartered Surveyor (Real Estate) Diploma Apprenticeship is designed both for school leavers and for existing employees within companies who currently do not have a relevant degree, and SDL Surveying will work with the university to guide students through the professional and theoretical content of the course.

Students are placed in SDL Surveying for a period of five years. During years one to three, they will be rotated in various departments of the company, which will provide them with comprehensive business knowledge and experience.

During the fourth and fifth years, they will work with SDL’s audit and technical teams to acquire more specific surveying knowledge.

At the end of the five years, they will have obtained a university degree and MRICS accreditation.

SDL currently has three apprentice surveyors taking the course in its Nottingham offices, Tom Walford, Caitlin True and James Morris, and the company is committed to developing opportunities for many more students to take the course in the years to come. to come.

Simon Jackson, Managing Director of SDL Surveying, said: “This is a brand new initiative for SDL Surveying and we are working closely with Nottingham Trent University to run a great course and ensure our apprentices have the type of learning and experience they need to start their career as a surveyor. We are delighted that Tom, Caitlin and James are currently working in our Nottingham office as first students and they will learn all there is to know about what we do and what is required as a surveyor.

“There is always a shortage of excellent surveyors, and we believe that with this course we will train an increasing number of next generation professionals who will set the highest standards in the work they do. These three are just the first of many to benefit from this new program.

Source link

Augmented and virtual reality at the University of Applied Sciences Lucerne

By University

Lucerne University of Applied Sciences

Opening of a new virtual reality center in Rotcruz

At the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, the virtual now merges with reality. Schools, SMEs and students should benefit from the new offers.

With a new augmented and virtual reality center, the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences wants to bring new technologies closer to schools and businesses. To this end, it is opening the Center for Immersive Realities (IRC) within the IT department of the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences in Rotkreuz, a statement said.

Both technologies will be used in more and more industries. However, many SMEs and schools are not sure what added value it will bring and whether the investments will be worth it. “Together with the Center, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts offers a low profile to businesses and educational institutions in the region.” One of the goals is that companies can implement projects with the university. “Such projects include, among others, virtual training environments where employees of SMEs learn new procedures for working on complex devices in a secure environment,” the university wrote.

IRC introduces itself.

Video: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences

The potential is also high in the education sector. For example, the work of human organs or complex processes such as electrical circuits can be transmitted more vividly and vividly than traditional learning materials, it is said. “Both technologies offer users a new form of interaction. For example, if the objects can be seen from all sides through virtual reality glasses and are within easy reach, then it is not only a different experience, but also a pleasant experience.

A preview of the new presentation of the Immersive Reality Center:

Showroom and interaction space: A wide range of augmented reality and virtual reality infrastructures as well as tools are available for visitors to familiarize themselves with the technologies.

Projects and advice: Small and medium-sized enterprises can implement their projects with the staff of the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Lucerne and use the infrastructure of the Immersive Reality Center.

Training and Development : The center offers general, semi-public and internal training in AR and VR. There is also close collaboration with vocational schools in the central Switzerland region. The first training project has already been launched with the Zug Industrial Commercial Training Center (GIBZ).

Networks: The immersive reality center is a meeting and networking place for people interested in augmented reality and virtual reality

Augmented and virtual reality is also gaining more weight at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences: in the autumn semester 2021, he will start specializing in augmented and virtual reality in the IT department. The practical part of the training takes place in specially equipped rooms at IRC. (dlw / ma)


Frank McCarthy

“Certified gamer. Problem solver. Internet enthusiast. Twitter scholar. Extremely humble alcohol geek. TV guru.”


Source link

Do athletes have to choose between university and stadium?

By University

Swiss shooter Nina Christen, who dropped out of biology studies to focus on training; she won a gold and a bronze medal at the Tokyo Games in 2020. Keystone / Georgios Kefalas

One third of Swiss athletes who took part in the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 were students or university graduates. Outside the stadium, it is “normal” students who have to juggle between lessons and high-level sports training.

This content was published on September 19, 2021 – 10:00

According to a new study “Elite Sport in Switzerland 2019”, 47% of athletes aged 25 to 34 have a higher education diploma (from a university or a vocational high school). That’s 5 percentage points lower than the rest of the population in the same age group. But it’s still a fairly high figure, explains Simon Niepmann, a former rowing champion who heads the “Elite Sport and Studies” program for Swiss Olympic, the umbrella organization for Swiss sport. An Olympic gold medalist himself, he managed to successfully complete his studies in sport and geography at the University of Basel, earning a bachelor’s degree in five years instead of three.

As its name suggests, the support program it runs aims to enable athletes to embark on a dual career. As part of the program launched in 2014, a network of 42 people is responsible for helping athletes reconcile the demands of competitive sport with their studies. These contact persons are located in almost all Swiss universities and help athletes plan their studies and their sports career years in advance.

“Elite sport and studies”

In 2014, Swiss Olympic launched the “Elite Sport and Studies” project in collaboration with Swiss University Sports – the umbrella organization of university sports clubs. The project became a program in 2017 and has been affiliated with Swiss Olympic since 2018. Swiss Olympic and Swiss University Sports have a close cooperation on this issue.

Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities – the conference of rectors of Swiss universities – signed a declaration in 2017. Their main objectives are to promote optional part-time studies, to lengthen courses and to reduce attendance requirements for athletes from competition.

In 2020, the two organizations signed a second declaration, adding the option of distance learning independent of time and place, which worked well with the study conditions imposed by the Covid.

End of insertion

SWI swissinfo.ch: Why was there hardly any organized support in Switzerland for student-athletes until a few years ago?

Simon Niepmann: In the past, student-athletes were extremely autonomous. During my studies, I noticed that in Switzerland, no difference was made between the students who practiced an elite sport, those who practiced a hobby or those who had a work in parallel with their course. All were considered part-time jobs. It was entirely up to the athletes to organize the time necessary to train for their sport in addition to their studies.

In Switzerland, sport is now seen more and more as a full-time professional activity, even if its status is not yet comparable to that of other countries, where being a sportsman is considered as a profession like any other.

SWI: What is the question that young athletes ask you most often?

SN: The most frequent question is: “I play high level national or international sport. What type of diploma training is an option for me?

Of course, I cannot give a general answer, because all athletes can study business or law. I have to look at each case individually. It depends on the field of study that the athletes are interested in, the demands of their sport, but also where they train and the flexibility offered by the university concerned.

SWI: What is the main support you can offer to student-athletes?

SN: Advance planning. This means starting at an early age to combine competitive sports and study. For example, it is necessary to identify the phases where the studies will require a lot of time and the phases of intensive training.

Ideally, schedule a schedule until graduation – the schedule can be readjusted every six months.

Our main task is to make athletes aware that they have to plan and that there are different people who can help them on their two-lane journey.

SWI: An analysis of the Swiss Olympic study in 2018 shows that top student-athletes are rarely registered as sportsmen or sportswomen when they are admitted to university.

SN: We are faced with two problems. On the one hand, we do not have access to information on all athletes regarding their education; on the other hand, universities do not always know which students are involved in competitive sports. We have a lot of room for improvement in this area.

What we try to do is keep competitive athletes informed, as often and as widely as possible, whether through newsletters, sports clubs or other channels.

We have also noticed that there is often a desire for discussion between student-athletes and young athletes still in high school. If athletes are talking to each other, there is less inhibition in asking simple questions than if they are talking to someone from a college official. We have created an online platform to facilitate this exchange.

SWI: The 2020 statement from Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities makes it clear that not all sports are compatible with all training courses. Which sport-study combinations are particularly difficult?

SN: I would hesitate to say that a certain sport does not work at all with a certain university subject, because it is always important to take into account that it is a very personal choice.

But we notice that winter sportsmen tend to study at a distance. The point is, they’re on the road all season, so they can’t regularly attend a class in person.

In terms of subjects, the most difficult for athletes are certainly those where there is a high proportion of practical work or laboratory lessons where students have to be in a certain place at a certain time.

SWI: The United States and China have long been at the top of the Olympic Games medal rankings. In China, for example, competitive athletes have the opportunity to focus on sports and then obtain favorable conditions for admission to a prestigious university. Are Swiss athletes at a disadvantage compared to competitors from these countries because they are forced to combine studies and sport?

SN: We believe that in a number of cases it is useful for athletes to train alongside their studies. Partly because there are a number of hours in the day that are not devoted to sport and where athletes can do other things, and also because studying is a cognitive distraction that motivates athletes to a higher level. different way.

An environment outside of the sporting world is also important for many athletes. It allows for a change of pace and can be rewarding and calming. Preparation for a post-sports career is also a very important point. When you stop playing sports, it is essential to have a second place to invest your energy and develop.

SWI: How does Switzerland rank in a global comparison in terms of support for student-athletes?

SN: We prefer to compare ourselves to countries of similar size. There are always different approaches. In Norway, sports associations collaborate with specific universities. So there you know more or less that if you play a certain sport, there is a university that cooperates with the national association or the Olympic committee.

With our network of coordinators in Switzerland, we want to show that athletes do not have to limit their options. We prefer to try to keep all options open. It is a process that we will continue to work on.

SWI: Is a dual career in competitive sport and school more a story of compromise, or a win-win situation?

SN: It’s definitely a compromise because you can’t commit 100% to sport and 100% to your studies at the same time. You have to plan and find a balance. Still, I wouldn’t say it devalues ​​both aspects. Studying at the same time doesn’t necessarily mean less success in sports – it often even means the opposite.

Source link

Do athletes have to choose between university and stadium?

By University

Swiss shooter Nina Christen, who dropped out of biology studies to focus on training; she won a gold and a bronze medal at the Tokyo Games in 2020. Keystone / Georgios Kefalas

One third of Swiss athletes who took part in the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 were students or university graduates. Outside the stadium, it is “normal” students who have to juggle between lessons and high-level sports training.

This content was published on September 19, 2021 – 10:00

According to a new study “Elite Sport in Switzerland 2019”, 47% of athletes aged 25 to 34 have a higher education diploma (from a university or a vocational high school). That’s 5 percentage points lower than the rest of the population in the same age group. But it’s still a fairly high figure, explains Simon Niepmann, a former rowing champion who heads the “Elite Sport and Studies” program for Swiss Olympic, the umbrella organization for Swiss sport. An Olympic gold medalist himself, he managed to successfully complete his studies in sport and geography at the University of Basel, earning a bachelor’s degree in five years instead of three.

As its name suggests, the support program it runs aims to enable athletes to embark on a dual career. As part of the program launched in 2014, a network of 42 people is responsible for helping athletes reconcile the demands of competitive sport with their studies. These contact persons are located in almost all Swiss universities and help athletes plan their studies and their sports career years in advance.

“Elite sport and studies”

In 2014, Swiss Olympic launched the “Elite Sport and Studies” project in collaboration with Swiss University Sports – the umbrella organization of university sports clubs. The project became a program in 2017 and has been affiliated with Swiss Olympic since 2018. Swiss Olympic and Swiss University Sports have a close cooperation on this issue.

Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities – the conference of rectors of Swiss universities – signed a declaration in 2017. Their main objectives are to promote optional part-time studies, to lengthen courses and to reduce attendance requirements for athletes from competition.

In 2020, the two organizations signed a second declaration, adding the option of distance learning independent of time and place, which worked well with the study conditions imposed by the Covid.

End of insertion

SWI swissinfo.ch: Why was there hardly any organized support in Switzerland for student-athletes until a few years ago?

Simon Niepmann: In the past, student-athletes were extremely autonomous. During my studies, I noticed that in Switzerland, no difference was made between students who practiced elite sports, those who practiced a hobby or those who had a job in parallel with their course. All were considered part-time jobs. It was entirely up to the athletes to organize the time needed to train for their sport in addition to their studies.

In Switzerland, sport is now seen more and more as a full-time professional activity, even if its status is not yet comparable to that of other countries, where being a sportsman is considered as a profession like any other.

SWI: What is the question that young athletes ask you most often?

SN: The most frequent question is: “I play high level national or international sport. What type of diploma training is an option for me?

Of course, I cannot give a general answer, because all athletes can study business or law. I have to look at each case individually. It depends on the field of study that the athletes are interested in, the demands of their sport, but also where they train and the flexibility offered by the university concerned.

SWI: What is the main support you can offer to student-athletes?

SN: Advance planning. This means starting at an early age to combine competitive sports and study. For example, it is necessary to identify the phases where the studies will require a lot of time and the phases of intensive training.

Ideally, schedule a schedule until graduation – the schedule can be readjusted every six months.

Our main task is to make athletes aware that they have to plan and that there are different people who can help them on their two-lane journey.

SWI: An analysis of the Swiss Olympic study in 2018 shows that top student-athletes are rarely registered as sportsmen or sportswomen when they are admitted to university.

SN: We are faced with two problems. On the one hand, we do not have access to information on all athletes regarding their education; on the other hand, universities do not always know which students are involved in competitive sports. We have a lot of room for improvement in this area.

What we try to do is keep competitive athletes informed, as often and as widely as possible, whether through newsletters, sports clubs or other channels.

We have also noticed that there is often a desire for discussion between student-athletes and young athletes still in high school. If athletes are talking to each other, there is less inhibition in asking simple questions than if they are talking to someone from a college official. We have created an online platform to facilitate this exchange.

SWI: The 2020 statement from Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities makes it clear that not all sports are compatible with all training courses. Which sports-study combinations are particularly difficult?

SN: I would hesitate to say that a certain sport does not work at all with a certain university subject, because it is always important to take into account that it is a very personal choice.

But we notice that winter sportsmen tend to study at a distance. The point is, they’re on the road all season, so they can’t regularly attend a class in person.

In terms of subjects, the most difficult for athletes are certainly those where there is a high proportion of practical work or laboratory lessons where students have to be in a certain place at a certain time.

SWI: The United States and China have long been at the top of the Olympic Games medal rankings. In China, for example, competitive athletes have the opportunity to focus on sports and then obtain favorable conditions for admission to a prestigious university. Are Swiss athletes at a disadvantage compared to competitors from these countries because they are forced to combine studies and sport?

SN: We believe that in a number of cases it is useful for athletes to train alongside their studies. Partly because there are a number of hours in the day that are not devoted to sport and where athletes can do other things, and also because studying is a cognitive distraction that motivates athletes to a higher level. different way.

An environment outside of the sporting world is also important for many athletes. It allows for a change of pace and can be rewarding and calming. Preparation for a post-sports career is also a very important point. When you stop playing sports, it is essential to have a second place to invest your energy and develop.

SWI: How does Switzerland rank in a global comparison in terms of support for student-athletes?

SN: We prefer to compare ourselves to countries of similar size. There are always different approaches. In Norway, sports associations collaborate with specific universities. So there you know more or less that if you play a certain sport, there is a university that cooperates with the national association or the Olympic committee.

With our network of coordinators in Switzerland, we want to show that athletes do not have to limit their options. We prefer to try to keep all options open. It is a process that we will continue to work on.

SWI: Is a dual career in competitive sport and school more a story of compromise, or a win-win situation?

SN: It’s definitely a compromise because you can’t commit 100% to sport and 100% to your studies at the same time. You have to plan and find a balance. Still, I wouldn’t say it devalues ​​both aspects. Studying at the same time doesn’t necessarily mean less success in sports – it often even means the opposite.

Source link