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Two people arrested for robbery of a vocational school

By Vocational school

LOGAN COUNTY, WV (WOWK) – According to the Logan County Sheriff’s Office, the Logan County IT Department reported an active burglary around 1:00 a.m. on Sunday.

Two men were inside the Auto Tech class at Ralph R. Willis Vocational School. Deputies from the night shift as well as WV State Police responded to the scene. Cpl. Derrick Miller of the Logan County Sheriff’s Department responded from his residence and returned security footage to Logan County 911 and the units at the scene.

Cameras with live motion detection alert had been installed at the Auto Tech center after multiple break-ins resulted in the theft worth several thousand dollars of power tools, catalytic converters and other items.

Donald Manns, 32, and Anthony Dalton, 31, both of Lincoln County, were caught stealing by response units. They were charged with burglary and robbery for the incident. The couple will also be charged with the other thefts under investigation, which include four burglary charges and four robbery charges over a one-month period.

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Professional medical school geared towards people who ‘want to make a difference’ | New

By Vocational school

According to city officials, Shahkor became the first black woman to open a professional medical school in Kern County.

Kern Valley Medical College offers a 17-week Medical Assistant program and a 5-week EKG program. Applicants must have a high school diploma, GED, or pass a university-administered entrance exam to enter. Other courses such as medical billing are also offered.

The university will also be announcing phlebotomy and EMT courses in late fall, external instructor and coordinator Nexi Henriquez said.

Cole, a former medical assistant teacher, said her love for education prompted her to open the university. Even after becoming a nurse and working in the field, Cole couldn’t forget the joy of education.

“Of all the work I’ve had, it has always taught me,” Cole said.

A high school dropout, Cole offers school to those who haven’t gone to college or are looking for a second chance. The founder and director wanted to create a place where everyone, regardless of their background, can work hard and reach their full potential.

“This school serves the person who felt they could never get there,” Cole said. “It is for people who want to make a difference in their life.

Cole said there were 20 students at his college. It also aims to reduce the number of students in the classroom so that students receive proper attention and care. Individuals can register for courses every month.

“No one is being left behind,” Cole said. “We care about their success. We want them to live their dreams.

Henriquez, a former student of Cole and now a professor at the university, said education has completely changed his life. She had a “traumatic experience” and became uncertain about her future. But the university instilled empowerment in Henrikes – she was able to pass her knowledge on to others and enrich their lives.

“When (students) first start a program, they do it because they want to start somewhere – they want to be something,” Henriquez said. “Thank you so much.”

Mayor Karen Goh attended the inauguration of Khan Valley Medical College on July 24, the first anniversary of the school’s opening. Cole was unable to organize a celebration due to the pandemic and hosted an event to mark the university’s first anniversary.

“(Cole) took a big risk during the pandemic… to open a new business,” Go said. “We couldn’t be proud of someone who was willing to take that risk and be successful.”

Goh added that Bakersfield’s rapidly growing population underscores the importance of new businesses and the ability to create jobs.

Nick Hill III, president of the Kern County Black Chamber of Commerce, encourages black youth to dream big and understand that their background does not interfere with their abilities.

“African American businesses are seeing this boost,” Hill said. “… Seeing other African-American companies becoming businesses, many other African-American companies will do the same.”

Malena Neira, a medical assistant student, dreamed of entering the medical field when she was in the first year of high school. His passion is to help others.

“I have no words to explain… how awesome this class is,” said Neira. “I am very happy to take this opportunity to come here and learn what we are learning now. “

Student Priscilla Serrano worked in business administration and wanted her own bright future. She found the program online, decided to apply, and discovered her love for the medical field.

“Before, I was always skeptical of myself,” Serrano said. “(This school) encouraged me to believe that I could do other things.”

Veronica Espinoza said that she chose this university because of its reasonable cost and short lead time. Espinoza works from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and goes to class from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. She loves evening classes because she wouldn’t be able to register otherwise. She wanted to be a mentor for children, which motivated her to pursue her dreams.

“As long as you focus on something (to my kids), you show you can do it,” Espinosa said.

Professional medical school geared towards people who ‘want to make a difference’ | Link to Professional School of Medicine news source for people who “want to make a difference” | New

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Professional medical school geared towards people who ‘want to make a difference’ | New

By Vocational school

Shar Cole became the first black woman to open a professional medical school in Kern County, according to city officials.

Kern Valley Medical College offers a 17-week Medical Assistant program and a five-week EKG program. A candidate must have a high school diploma, GED, or pass an entrance exam administered by the college to enroll. Other courses, such as medical billing, are also offered.

The college also plans to unveil a phlebotomy and EMT course in late fall, said Nexi Henriquez, instructor and external coordinator.

A former physician assistant teacher Cole said her love of education drove her to open this college. Even after becoming a nurse and working in the field, Cole couldn’t forget the joy of educating.

“Of all the jobs I’ve had, it has always brought me back to teaching,” Cole said.

A high school dropout, Cole directs her school toward those who haven’t gone to college and are looking for a second chance. The founder and director wanted to create a place where everyone, regardless of their background, can work hard and reach their full potential.

“This school is for that person who felt they could never get there,” Cole said. “It is for people who want to make a difference in their life. “

Cole said his college has 20 students. She also aims to reduce class sizes, which allows her students to receive the proper attention and care. Individuals can register for a course each month.

“No one is left behind,” Cole said. “We care about whether they are successful. We want them to live their dreams.

Henriquez, a former student of Cole and now an instructor for the college, said education has completely changed his life. She had a “traumatic experience” that left her uncertain of her future. However, college instilled empowerment in Henriquez – she could pass her knowledge on to others and enrich their lives.

“When (students) first start the program, they do it because they want to start somewhere – they want to be something,” Henriquez said. “I am really grateful.”

Mayor Karen Goh attended the inauguration of Kern Valley Medical College on July 24, the first anniversary of its opening. Cole was unable to hold a celebratory ceremony due to the pandemic and hosted the event for the college’s first anniversary.

“(Cole) took a big risk during the pandemic… to start a new business,” Goh said. “We couldn’t be more proud of someone who was willing to take that risk and be successful. “

Goh added that Bakersfield’s rapid population growth highlights the importance of new businesses and their ability to create jobs.

Cole’s accomplishments inspire black youth to dream big and understand that their background does not hinder their abilities, said Nick Hill III, president of the Kern County Black Chamber of Commerce.

“African American businesses are seeing this boost,” Hill said. “Seeing … other African American businesses turning into corporations, it’s going to inspire a lot of other African American businesses to do the same.”

Malena Neira, a medical assistant student, dreamed of entering the medical field since she was in first year in high school; his passions revolve around helping others.

“I have no words to explain… how amazing this class is,” said Neira. “I am so happy to have this opportunity to come here and actually learn the things that we are learning now.”

Student Prisilla Serrano worked in office administration and wanted a better future for herself. She found the program online, decided to apply, and discovered a love for the medical field.

“Before, I always doubted myself,” Serrano said. “(This school) kind of encouraged me to believe that I can do other things.”

Veronica Espinoza said that she chose this college because of its reasonable cost and short time frame. Espinoza works from eight to five and then goes to class from 5.30 to 9.30. She loves evening classes because she wouldn’t be able to register otherwise. She wants to be a mentor for her children, which has motivated her to pursue her dreams.

“Show (to my kids) that as long as you focus on something you can do it,” Espinoza said.

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Beshear announces $ 75 million in vocational school renovations

By Vocational school

KENTUCKY – About $ 75 million in grants goes to modernizing vocational schools, as part of Governor Andy Beshear’s Better Kentucky Plan, which “helps create opportunities for families in all corners of the Commonwealth,” according to a statement from his office. The Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission (SFCC) is now accepting applications for these grants.


What would you like to know

  • About $ 75 million in grants go to modernizing vocational schools
  • Kentucky School Facilities Construction Commission (SFCC) is now accepting applications for these grants
  • Eligible schools can submit applications, which will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. on August 13, for a maximum of $ 10 million for renovations.
  • Applicants will be scored on various criteria

“Vocational schools play a crucial role in preparing our employees for the jobs of today and tomorrow,” said Beshear. “My administration will always put education first, and that includes making sure our school facilities have the structural upgrades and technology necessary to serve our students in the future.”

Eligible schools can submit applications, which will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. on August 13, for up to $ 10 million for renovations. The governor’s office said the request has been sent to individual districts that qualify for this funding pool. Funding will then be granted by the SFCC on September 1.

Local Vocational Education Centers (LAVEC) which are district-managed vocational and technical education centers included in district installation plans are eligible to apply for funding to cover the cost of renovations, such as upgrading. update, expansion, repair, replacement or reconstruction of a structure. Each district can only receive one grant.

Applicants will be scored on the following criteria, provided by the governor’s office:

  • Age of current vocational education institution;
  • Financial need;
  • Enrollment in job creation and training programs as a percentage of total district enrollments;
  • Unemployment rate by county in May 2021; and
  • Quality of planning and layout of district facilities.

Applications, along with supporting documents, should be emailed to [email protected] by the deadline and mailed to 700 Louisville Road, Carriage House, Frankfort, Kentucky, 40601. Incomplete applications will not be considered. account.


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Elizabethtown College Launches Graduate and Vocational School | State

By Vocational school

Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, July 7, 2021 / PRNewswire / -Recently Elizabethtown College Launch of the Graduate College (SGPS). Formerly known as the Continuing Vocational School since 1951, SGPS has maintained its foundation for over a century while offering innovative graduate and online programs and micro-degrees in a variety of flexible formats. I am. Elizabethtown College Excellence with the access and flexibility that lifelong learners demand.

“The Graduate College aims to provide students with a global academic program, relationship-based lifelong learning, personalized support, and the personal flexibility that students have learned to experience at Etown. “.” Elizabethtown College President Cecilia M. McCormick, JD said. Our enhanced schools provide students, businesses and organizations with a variety of options to expand their knowledge and enhance their careers and transform their workforce by strengthening their skills. “

Globally, Elizabethtown College Adult learner satisfaction includes institutional effectiveness, campus climate, enrollment effectiveness, academic counseling, admissions and financial aid, service excellence, and safety and security. SGPS also offers students:

  • Undergraduate degree, graduate degree, cumulative degree
  • Hundreds of online courses
  • Teachers are practice teachers and professionals who bring content and working expertise into the classroom.
  • All students will be assigned an educational advisor
  • Free tutoring service that provides 24/7 online tutoring
  • Partnering with business leaders and organizations to provide education A professional skills development program for employees Affinity Award
  • Transfer of credits from previous institutions, military training and work experience

“The number of enrollments in our graduate programs has tripled in the past year,” he said. Elizabethtown College

Jack Rice, Dean of the Graduate School of Specialized Research. “We are seeing a growing demand for certificates and micro-certification programs that are fully stacked and allow students to advance in their careers and businesses. “

In regards to Elizabethtown College

Elizabethtown CollegeLocated in the center-south Lancaster County, PennsylvaniaIs a private coeducational institution offering more than 50 degrees in health, science, engineering, political science, business, communication, art and music, and education. Details: etown.edu ..

Executive Director of Marketing and Communications

Source Elizabethtown College

Elizabethtown College Launches Graduate and Vocational School | State

Source Link Elizabethtown College Launches Graduate and Vocational School | State

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Carter vocational school construction change | New

By Vocational school

Carter County School District’s plans to build a brand new tech center are being redesigned.

Superintendent Ronnie Dotson said the district plans to build a new facility to house the programs, but the request for a $ 10 million renovation grant has brought new possibilities.

The School Facilities Construction Commission received $ 75 million in general funds for the 2021-22 school year through Bill 556, section 18. The local school district which has vocational education centers in the region is now eligible to receive up to $ 10 million specified for renovation expense support.

“Our vocational school is the # 1 need in our district,” Dotson said of how the needs are categorized in the local planning document. “It will really help us get that $ 10 million.”

No action by the board of directors has been taken. Dotson had just heard the news of the possibility on Wednesday.

“It is more than likely that we will take a path to renovate the existing vocational school rather than building a new one,” he said.

Dotson said his understanding was that the grant was allocated specifically for renovations and not for new construction, much like the grant East Carter High School received through Governor Andy Beshear’s Better Kentucky Plan. The $ 14 million allocated to East High is specifically for renovations and cannot be used for anything else, Dotson said.

“In order not to lose $ 10 million, I’m sure we would just renovate the existing building instead of going somewhere else and building a new one,” Dotson said.

“It’s different from our original plan to build an entirely new one, but with $ 10 million we’ll be able to make a new one,” Dotson said. The district will not demolish the old one, because the funding will not allow it.

“Basically what would have to happen, to be worth $ 10 million, would be to gut it almost completely and do it again,” said Dotson of the current center.

The grant is due in August 13, and applications began to be accepted on Thursday.

Dotson said the district will apply and believes the school has a good chance of receiving the money depending on grant and writing language requirements.

The renovation of the technical center is another on a growing list of construction projects in the neighborhood.

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Former Mary Ann Garber school turned into a vocational school

By Vocational school

HAMILTON COUNTY, Tenn (WDEF) – A new one-of-a-kind school is in the works for Hamilton County schools.

The plan is to renovate the old Mary Ann Garber School and turn it into a vocational school to help students better prepare for the future workforce.

The former Mary Ann Garber School on Roanoke Street has been unoccupied for several years now, but will soon be a fully functioning trade school for Hamilton County students.

“At the start, we’ll start with the 11th and 12th grade. There will be a possibility of dual registration with the State of Chattanooga. There will also be adults who have not completed high school and who can return for vocational training, as there will be a number of different trades that will be involved, ”said Mayor Jim Coppinger, County of. Hamilton.

The school plans to use both educators and entrepreneurs to help students not only succeed in school, but also prepare for the workforce.

“The Association of General Contractors provides people with expertise in the field. They won’t learn skills they won’t use. They will not learn things that are archaic. They will learn current affairs. Young people can go and immediately enter the labor market. They can have a good salary and competitive benefits, ”says Dr Steve Highlander, County Commissioner.

Students will be able to receive training in a multitude of trades such as: HVAC, Welding, Masonry, Carpentry, Electricity and more.

“It gives the student the opportunity to know what is going on on a job site, to be trained in what to expect on a job site, to also serve as an intern on a job site while he is doing it in preparation.” from the first day they graduate so they can go out and be productive, ”Mayor Coppinger explains.

The school is expected to cost around $ 8 million and is funded by private and public partnerships.

The vocational school is expected to open in August 2022 and plans to guarantee participating students a job in the labor market by the time they graduate.

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From vocational school to the chair of CEO

By Vocational school

Interview

The journey of Eternity-IT CEO, Asaf Bar, to create his IT company has had many twists and turns. Along the way, he burned down a computer, worked in his basement, and created an app to find missing people.

Maya manela 12:2406.27.21

When Asaf Bar, CEO of Eternity-IT, was 8 years old, he received his first IBM computer and, that same day, burned it down. “I wanted to see how it worked. I opened it to find out its chips and burned it after two minutes when I touched contacts. We replaced it, but this computer was my doorstep. I entered the development world, bought books and started learning software languages, ”said Bar.

Although he was interested in computers from an early age, his journey towards a career in technology and building an IT business was anything but routine. After not being accepted into a good high school in his hometown of Bat Yam, Bar was forced to attend a vocational school in Tel Aviv. “At that point, I realized that if I didn’t put the effort into my studies, I would have a problem later in life. I enrolled in an accounting class and graduated successfully and with full enrollment, a very rare thing in itself in this school, ”he explained. During his military service, Bar served as a border patrol fighter and two years later, due to an injury, he joined the Corps of Communications. “I insisted on getting into something about software and very quickly I found myself writing code in the Corps of Communications. Everyone there thought an employee had arrived, but I came in with it. capacities.” During his service he also began to study accounting, but later the advice of his partner’s father changed the course of his life.

Asaf Bar, CEO of Eternity-IT Photo: courtesy

“From the age of 16 I didn’t live at home, I lived with my girlfriends because, as a child of divorced parents, I was looking for a home that had both a father and a mother. During my military service, I earned my living. computer repair. It was the start of the internet age and I was more interested in the darker parts of the net – mainly hacking. My girlfriend’s father saw my skills with computers and urged me to quit accounting studies, luckily he really insisted and even helped me pay for my studies. I switched to studying computer science at Tel Aviv University. It was one of the best decisions of my life and very quickly when I was still in the military I found myself joining a startup and working in a company with people who are part of the software world. . It was the first time in my life that someone had given me a chance, ”said Bar.

After completing his military service, Bar was hired as a database supporter and intern at SRL for 4,000 NIS (about $ 1,200) per month – and thus began his career in the IT field. “I would work and study 300 hours a month. Something inside me told me that the more I knew and got involved, the more I would learn. The desire to prove myself made me work crazy hours. important for me to know a lot about a range of topics and then delve into specific topics when needed. Any shortcomings I had I was covered for dozens of hours and nights. None technological question remained unanswered on my desk. ”During this period, Bar also met his wife and had a baby girl. And with such changes in his personal life, he decided to move on to a new job.

Turning

Bar’s second opportunity was not easy. It was when he started his job at Opisoft, “I came in demanding to be CTO, which was not well accepted with only four years of experience in the field. I came for an interview, but they wanted me to be a senior developer. When I left the room the CEO said “we don’t have a CTO role at the moment, but we had a deal that went wrong. This is technology that no one here is familiar with. If you go to a meeting and are successful in bringing the project to us, the job is yours. ‘ It was a technology based on JAVA. I picked up a book and read it. I went to a meeting and it ended with us getting the project – and I getting the job. I worked at Opisoft for five years, and that’s where I was introduced to the field of BI, in which I work today. ”

After five years, when he felt he had reached his glass ceiling at Opisoft, Bar turned to his next goal, leading the field of BI on a business level. He joined Bynet Software Systems and founded its BI department. “The opportunity for me there was to set up the BI business and run the business with both hands, even though the pay was relatively low. I was there for two and a half years and the team grew to 50 people, the success was quick and I felt that things could be done differently. I had been in two companies before, and I created a business area for one of them. Bar left Bynet in 2008 to found Eternity-IT, which he still runs today.

Bar started the business from the basement of his home, and from day one he had a time reporting system, internal company emails, and even a switchboard. “Everyone laughed at me because I was a one-man business with a switchboard. As a person who always thinks big, I remember imagining where I want to go in detail and I firmly believe that the universe is listening. When you want something and strive for it, and of course, don’t lose hope and desire to achieve it – you will, ”said Bar.

The lowest point

Six months after the founding of Eternity by Bar, came the economic crisis of 2008. “No phone calls or faxes arrived. We were a very small company, 10 employees and I had no work to give them. . It was the great crisis of my career. I embarked on a new path with great self-confidence, I was responsible for families who depended on me for a living and was under pressure so that there would be no calls or faxes. And throughout that time, our competitors were jubilant and waiting for our downfall, ”said Bar.

Bar describes this period as a long and continuous day, during which he realized that he had to innovate, change his work methodology, look to different markets and keep fighting. “It was then that I discovered what it means to be a struggling entrepreneur. An ordinary entrepreneur who has dreams and wants to make them come true will jump between things – he will see that something is wrong and will move on. For me, the option of not being there did not exist, “he said. After about a year and a half, the company has 30 employees and its reputation is growing in the market. “Every person who starts a business should assume that no one will be there during hard times. That their tools are creativity and persistence. Even though I have a lot of friends in the industry, at the end of the day, everyone is committed to their own organization and not to their friend. ”

In 2015, what Bar defines as the “hottest time in business,” his father was injured in a car accident. “I found myself taking care of my father while working every day and after two months he passed away.” It was then that he decided to make another change and sold part of the Eternity group to Aman for tens of millions of shekels. “I divorced and started on a new and better path for myself. I decided I wanted to relieve myself and sold to the Aman group. Sometimes you have to neutralize your ego in order to grow. C “was one of the most important decisions because by partnering with Aman, Eternity moved into the big leagues. We were 250 employees and in four years we became 500. Number two in the Israeli market in terms of data” , did he declare.

Hazilu

A missing person case in 2018 greatly affected Bar and prompted him to take action. Noga Yitzhak, 34, from Tel Aviv was last seen in Ramat Gan before disappearing two days before her birthday. Bar set out to create Hazilu (a call for help in Hebrew), an app that helps parents of disabled children and children of elderly people with dementia protect their families and locate them if necessary. . “I went to meet Noga Yitzhak’s dad, Ron and asked him what we as a tech community can do. He said he got hundreds of photos from people who say they saw Noga and what “He can’t really identify it. I realized it was solvable. and that’s where the business came from,” Bar said.

To date, the app, which uses facial recognition technology, has helped locate hundreds of people and reconnect them with their families. “In a two-year process, we reached dozens of local authorities and mobilized them for the project. We have 450,000 registered users and I am very proud of this company. It’s free and it’s for a good cause.

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Board of Education approves changes to vocational school admissions

By Vocational school

Under new state regulations, vocational and technical schools in Massachusetts will need to recalibrate their admissions systems to prevent what advocates see as decades of discrimination and missed opportunity.

A coalition of groups that have pushed for change applaud the rule adopted by the State Council for Primary and Secondary Education on Tuesday. But some said it still leaves too much room for exclusion and could leave room for violations of federal civil rights law.

There is a great demand for a place in one of the state’s technical and vocational high schools. A recent state report found that across Massachusetts, more than 18,500 aspiring ninth graders applied for just 10,616 open places, with stiffer competition in some parts of the state (PDF) .

And as vocational and technical schools assess candidate grades, disciplinary and attendance records, and teacher recommendations, they tend to block disproportionate numbers of students of color, learners of color from their waiting lists. English and low income students.

The new regulation aims to change that. It prohibits schools from taking into account student excused absences from school or “minor” disciplinary incidents in admission decisions. And it’s asking schools to publish admission plans every fall that meet federal Title VI anti-discrimination guidelines.

Ahead of the board vote on Tuesday, Education Secretary Jim Peyser approved the settlement, saying it “dramatically changes the landscape” around vocational school admissions.

“There is now a positive obligation on school committees to adopt non-discriminatory policies and to react proactively whenever there is evidence that there is a disparate impact,” said Peyser.

Speakers from the Vocational Education Justice Coalition, which had pushed for admissions reform, were more low-key in their praise.

“We are concerned that many children face the exact same problem that their older siblings have faced for two decades.”

Peter Enrich, President of the Progressive Democrats of Massachusetts

“It was a step in the right direction – but a relatively small step – towards solving a very serious problem,” said Peter Enrich, chairman of the Massachusetts Progressive Democrats, who was part of that coalition.

Enrich said the previous system – which gave scarce professional places to students who had felt relatively comfortable in traditional classrooms – made “absolutely no sense, from a political point of view. “, and therefore welcomed this change.

But Enrich, the former general counsel for the state’s finance and administration ministry, said the new rule was still not enough: leaving schools to comply with complex federal civil rights protections and not put in place a “very flexible process” for the state to deal with cases of disparate impact when they arise.

“We are concerned that many children face the exact same problem that their older siblings have faced for two decades,” Enrich said.

Many coalition members argued that a simple lottery would be a fairer way to ensure that vocational schools welcome volunteer applicants looking for an alternative mode of public education – and would more clearly stay on the good side of the relevant federal law.

At Tuesday’s meeting, Peyser argued that nationwide, many vocational schools have “no objection” selective admission systems from federal education officials. “The presence of admission criteria themselves does not necessarily imply discrimination or disparate impact,” he said. “It’s the implementation of those policies, the details, that matter.

Dinanyili Paulino, another member of the coalition, said she was still concerned that the young students she works with may still be “discouraged” by the persistence of selective admission systems separating them from vocational education.

Paulino, chief operating officer of Chelsea-based non-profit La Colaborativa, said the pandemic had drawn attention to the dearth of well-paying jobs available to immigrant-rich communities like Chelsea, Everett. and Revere, and the economic disasters that can result.

Just this week, said Paulino, an 18-year-old working with La Colaborativa dropped out of high school to help her mother with the housework.

She says, ‘I want to finish school, but I really need the money, “Paulino said.” So now she is now waking up at 2 am and going to clean the buildings with her mother. La This particular youngster’s situation would have been much better if she had been in a professional setting.

Paulino said as she celebrated the new rule, she thinks policymakers in the state don’t understand cases like this: “Why don’t we turn our attention to young people who not only want and desire to go learn in them? “

Under the new regulations, schools will be required to submit their scheduled admissions program by October 1 of this year.

Enrich said he hoped the settlement would work as advertised, but that he and like-minded advocates would explore other options – including a push for federal litigation – if that wasn’t enough.

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Riley pledges to enforce new rules for admission to vocational schools

By Vocational school

BOSTON (SHNS) – Regulations passed on Tuesday intended to affect applicants for the 2022-2023 school year will require vocational and technical schools to develop their own admission policies “that promote fair access”, removing the requirement as per in which the grades, attendance, disciplinary records and recommendations of counselors are used as admission criteria.

Elementary and Secondary Education Commissioner Jeff Riley said the new regulations would bring Massachusetts more in line with other states, give state officials the power to intervene in cases of non-compliance and a process that has “remained untouched” for 20 years.

“Last year we gave vocational schools the opportunity to make changes, and we didn’t feel like they had done a big enough job to do it, so we’re asking today ‘ hui the opportunity to intervene, if necessary, to make sure the children have a fair chance, ”Riley said before the elementary and secondary education board voted to approve the new regulation.

He said his ministry planned to “be very aggressive” in cases of non-compliance and could “order changes to admissions policies that may include the requirement of a lottery” in those cases.

A February analysis of waitlist data shows that demand for vocational education in Massachusetts exceeds available places, with 1.75 student applications completed for each program place. In some communities, according to the analysis, the number of applications has reached double the number of places available.

This review also identified disparities in the number of offers of admission made for different subgroups of students, concluding that “students of color, students identified as economically disadvantaged, students with disabilities, learners of English and students [whose] the first language is not English received fewer offers of admission.

A group called the Vocational Education Justice Coalition had urged the state to move towards a lottery-based admissions system, and before the vote called on coalition members described as access and equity gaps in the new approach.

Lunenburg Senator John Cronin also called for changes, using the public comment period at Tuesday’s meeting to point out three questions he wanted answered: which admission scores need to be set, which are fair, and fair and which require an admission lottery.

“I’m afraid the answers to these questions will vary from district to district, from a board member to a board member, from a commissioner to a commissioner, from a school administrator to a school administrator,” did he declare. “Until we have clear regulations and standards that provide clear answers to these questions, we are only answering the more difficult questions surrounding this problem.”

No member of the board of directors voted against the settlement. Parents’ representative Mary Ann Stewart voted “present”.

“I am also very happy to see the coalition’s collaborative effort with the commissioner and the ministry working together to put in place a good policy. I don’t think we’re there yet, personally, ”said Stewart.

Among other speakers who addressed the council during its public comment period, parents raised concerns about the wearing of masks in schools.

Speakers raised issues including conflicting messages students could receive if unmasked adults force them to wear masks and an uneven landscape in schools if individual districts are able to choose whether or not to impose masks .

At several points in the meeting, board chair Katherine Craven asked members of the public to remain silent so the board could continue, including in a case where the crowd booed after an update on the assessment of Riley’s performance. Some in the crowd continued to shout comments – although not all were fully audible on the livestream, one person said the masks oppressed children and another asked board members how they slept the night.

After Riley introduced the Vocational School Rules, a “let her speak” chant rose in the audience and the board rose for a break. After the meeting resumed, it was punctuated by the sounds of people knocking on windows outside.

“We understand that there are people who are unhappy with the wearing of the mask that must have taken place,” Riley said. “I’m not sure the masks are coming off and being asked why they keep banging.”

Over the weekend, Riley handed out advice clarifying that education officials will href = ‘https: //statehousenews.com/brief/2021910 ′> recommend, but not require, that students and staff wear masks during summer school programs. All health and safety recommendations, including mask and social distancing requirements, are expected to be lifted for the 2021-2022 school year.

When asked about the department’s position on summer masking on Tuesday, Massachusetts Teachers Association president Merrie Najimy said her union believed there was no one-size-fits-all because children under 12 years are not yet eligible for COVID-19 vaccines and vaccination and infection rates. vary by community.

“Each local community should decide who should and should not be masked according to their situation,” she told the press service.

[Chris Van Buskirk contributed reporting]
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