Vocational school – Maleny Celtic http://malenyceltic.org/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 12:22:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://malenyceltic.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-25-120x120.png Vocational school – Maleny Celtic http://malenyceltic.org/ 32 32 ‘Disintegration’ plan to replace vocational school leaves counselor uneasy https://malenyceltic.org/disintegration-plan-to-replace-vocational-school-leaves-counselor-uneasy/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 12:22:30 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/disintegration-plan-to-replace-vocational-school-leaves-counselor-uneasy/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News]]>

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It’s a battle between the head and the heart, said a school counselor.

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The future of B. Davison, a vocational high school in London, is at the heart of a dispute over where and how struggling high school students should be allowed to learn. And it left administrators angry at Tuesday night’s meeting of the Thames Valley District School Board.

It turns out administrators will have little say in saving B. Davison — at least in its current form as an alternative to a typical high school — as the board grapples with a years-long process to “disintegrate” his system.

Under this model, which began rolling out in 2020, students at all schools should have the option of preparing for one of three pathways upon graduation: college, university, or the workforce. It also means that students who need courses like those offered at B. Davison are instead directed to similar opportunities at their home high schools, depending on where they live.

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“My head and my mind accept all of this information as the truth. My heart has a completely different feeling,” London administrator Sheri Polhill said.

She called the staff presentation “compelling,” but said she was concerned about students who found a sense of community in struggling B. Davison at other schools, where they are placed simply because of geography.

“How are we going to make homeless students like B. Davison feel the same at their regular community high school?” Polhill said. “I really think it’s a special feeling that students who historically went to B. Davison really, really needed.”

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Enrollment at the school has been declining for years, board staff said, although trustees and some Londoners are split on whether the decline is simply due to family choices or because the school board has ceased to share B. Davison as a viable option. Parents, graduates and members of the community sounded the alarm last year about a possible school closure after announcing that enrollment was halted.

The Trafalgar Street School will not be closed, council staff said repeatedly on Tuesday, but rather considered for future “programming options” and “potential use” of its square footage.

There are now only 76 students enrolled in the vocational school, which offers courses in hospitality, welding, construction, auto mechanics, horticulture and cosmetology, as well as co-op programs and some university courses. Many courses help students enter the job market directly after graduation.

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As a board, we need to challenge assumptions about what students are able and the belief that some students are less capable than others,” Associate Principal Riley Culhane told trustees on Tuesday.

He said families had expressed concerns about the variety of classes offered at their home schools. All schools now have a greater range of options to cater to different learners, administrators heard.

TVDSB staff came prepared with answers that sounded like selling points for the new system, dancing around numerous questions from administrators about whether B. Davison’s current model can be saved and the power of administrators to run a change of course at this point.

Culhane and other school board principals have argued that the use of ‘streaming’ – screening students based on their ability and academic achievement – amounts to discrimination, disproportionately hitting black students , Indigenous and other marginalized students, and potentially delaying their future opportunities.

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There were few choices for administrators, who received Tuesday’s presentation simply as an update, but will be able to make decisions about future uses of B. Davison when those options are presented as part of a larger package. .

Londoners or groups can submit written comments or request to present to trustees about this lineup at the November 1 board meeting, although staff did not highlight the desirability at the meeting. . All written contributions and delegation requests are due by 4 p.m. Oct. 21, according to the TVDSB website.

We must provide students with choices that lead to the most ultimate success for them. Students are choosing not to leave their home community to go to a one-track vocational school,” Education Director Mark Fisher said Tuesday when Polhill asked if administrators could still step in to stop the changes at B. Davison.

Single-track vocational schools do not best meet the needs of students,” he added.

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Governor hails vocational school’s extensive international connections https://malenyceltic.org/governor-hails-vocational-schools-extensive-international-connections/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 10:34:22 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/governor-hails-vocational-schools-extensive-international-connections/ Jember, Jawa Timur (ANTARA) – The Governor of East Java, Khofifah Indar Parawansa, has commended the Puger Sea Fishing Vocational School in Jember District for its close ties to business and labor industry, both at home and abroad. “I encourage maintaining and improving on this success story because connection and correspondence are important in the […]]]>

Jember, Jawa Timur (ANTARA) – The Governor of East Java, Khofifah Indar Parawansa, has commended the Puger Sea Fishing Vocational School in Jember District for its close ties to business and labor industry, both at home and abroad.

“I encourage maintaining and improving on this success story because connection and correspondence are important in the work industry. Moreover, I see that the connectivity of vocational training alumni is already extensive,” noted Parawansa during his visit to Jember District Vocational School. In Monday.

The governor was proud to witness the progress of vocational high school, as graduates of vocational sea fishing school were widely accepted to work overseas, such as in Japan and South Korea.

“Indeed, this achievement has gone through a long process. I am sure that there must be measurable milestones prepared by Islamic schools and boarding schools, especially since the vocational high school is a reference for the construction of the profile of character of Pancasila’s students,” she noted.

Parawansa expressed his optimism that the cadet students, who have entered the world of work and industry, will continue to uphold the character of Pancasila and always keep the spirit of upholding the integrity and unity of the Republic of Indonesia.

“I’m sure that wherever you work, you won’t forget your character. Professionalism and Pancasila’s characteristics must go hand in hand,” Parawansa remarked.

Addressing hundreds of students attending there, the governor said that the provincial education department in East Java has worked with state universities to provide a special quota for graduates of vocational schools for the faculty of vocational training to improve academic success.

“There is vocational training faculty at Airlangga University and 10 November Institute of Technology (ITS) which provide quotas for vocational training graduates. connectivity for vocational students wishing to continue their studies, particularly in vocational training,” she said. noticed.

Meanwhile, the Principal of Puger Fisheries and Marine Vocational School, Kuntjoro Basuki, explained that currently the school has five excellent expertise skills and focuses on the maritime field.

The top five expertise skills are Fishing Vessel Nautical, Fish Processing Agrotechnology, Fishing Vessel Engineering, Fishing Agro-Industry, and Construction Engineering naval.

“This vocational school is the only best practice to imbibe the character of Pancasila among the students by the General Director of Vocational Studies. We traveled for four months to several vocational schools in Indonesia with the General Director of Vocational Education to lead by example,” he added.

Related News: Vocational education targeted for 80% of working-age people
Related News: Relaunch of Indonesian Vocational School in Multimedia, Animation

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NCDMB hands over vocational school to UI https://malenyceltic.org/ncdmb-hands-over-vocational-school-to-ui/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 01:49:26 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/ncdmb-hands-over-vocational-school-to-ui/ The Nigerian Content Development and Control Council has handed over the vocational school at the University of Ibadan to the tertiary institution. The board said it built the vocational school in line with its capacity building mandate and the 10-year Nigerian content strategic roadmap. Handing over the facility to the university’s Vice Chancellor, Prof. Kayode […]]]>

The Nigerian Content Development and Control Council has handed over the vocational school at the University of Ibadan to the tertiary institution.

The board said it built the vocational school in line with its capacity building mandate and the 10-year Nigerian content strategic roadmap.

Handing over the facility to the university’s Vice Chancellor, Prof. Kayode Adebowale, NCDMB Executive Secretary, Simbi Wabote described the feat as a milestone in the development of Nigerian content.

He said the strength of Nigeria’s economy and prosperity lay in the hands of skilled craftsmen, craftsmen and labourers.

He said that the University of Ibadan, located in the central senatorial area of ​​Oyo, was represented by Senator Teslim Folarin, who served as the chairman of the Senate Committee on Local Content and was a huge supporter of the activities of the NCDMB.

Wabote described the event as a great opportunity to assess the Nigerian content journey and the state of the 10-year strategic roadmap.

He said the vocational school was to produce top notch talented craftsmen, craftsmen and laborers who would help Nigeria change the narrative from dependence on imported goods and equipment to total dependence on the regard to products made in Nigeria.

The NCDMB boss noted that the University of Ibadan was Nigeria’s premier university and renowned for its academic achievements, as he challenged the center to launch Nigeria’s much-needed industrial revolution.

“With the rapid advancement of technologies and skills required today and for the energy transition and the future of the oil and gas industry, the inauguration of this vocational school is a clear call to the University of Ibadan to lead the establishment of Nigerian competitive advantage once again,” he said.

Wabote said the scope of work being carried out at the center includes the construction of the main building consisting of three workshops and three classrooms, each for the mechanical, electrical and welding and fabrication trades, as well as offices for the director of the centre, the administrative staff and the receptionist.

He said the council’s investment also included construction of generators and gatehouses, provision of a borehole and water storage facility, fencing and landscaping of the center premises, supply and the installation of a 500 KVA generator and the training of technical teachers in the use of the installed equipment.

He advised the University community and stakeholders to ensure proper maintenance of installed facilities, support for sustainability and the appointment of quality staff so that the huge investment is justified.

The University of Ibadan Vocational School, according to the NCDMB, was the third vocational school the council would develop.

In his address, Senator Folarin said he was delighted to have facilitated the establishment of the multi-billion naira high-tech skills center.

He said the facility was designed and built as a unique platform to train the citizens of Oyo State in different skills in oil and gas and other sectors of the Nigerian economy. .

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Vienna Vocational School helped young people | News, Sports, Jobs https://malenyceltic.org/vienna-vocational-school-helped-young-people-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 05:15:01 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/vienna-vocational-school-helped-young-people-news-sports-jobs/ Byrl R. Shoemaker, director of the Ohio State Division of Vocational Education, proposed the concept of a vocational boarding school in January 1964. Under the Manpower, Development and Training Act of 1962, the Mahoning Valley Vocational School (MVVS) was established as the first residential vocational training program for the disabled or “disadvantaged” Ohio […]]]>

Byrl R. Shoemaker, director of the Ohio State Division of Vocational Education, proposed the concept of a vocational boarding school in January 1964.

Under the Manpower, Development and Training Act of 1962, the Mahoning Valley Vocational School (MVVS) was established as the first residential vocational training program for the disabled or “disadvantaged” Ohio boys. The school opened on July 29, 1964 and was located at Youngstown Air Reserve Station in Vienna.

The program was aimed at boys aged 16 to 21 with cultural, educational, economic and/or social problems. Many young men were rejected by the armed forces because they were emotionally immature and/or educationally unsuitable, or did not meet Job Corps requirements. Many were also high school dropouts or high school graduates who lacked marketable skills. Any boy enrolled in the MVVS was accepted into the program.

The school’s mission was to help young men acquire the appropriate skills, work habits, and attitudes to be productive in society. The program also helped trainees develop their individual talents, good character, sound mind and body, and a sense of social responsibility.

The educational phase of the program was funded by the Manpower, Development and Training Act 1962. The residential phase of the program was funded by a $250,000 trust fund established by the Leon A. Beeghly Foundation.

The following vocational training courses were offered: electrical appliance repairer, bodybuilder, car mechanic, car service station mechanic, baker, bookkeeper, general office clerk, cook, gardener-keeper, draftsman, tabulator operator and console operator, building maintenance, machine operator, stock inventory clerk, welder, small engine repairman and peripheral equipment operator. The duration of the program varied from 6 to 12 months depending on the field of study. Students generally attended eight hours of lessons a day.

MVVS facilities included four furnished dormitories, an education building, an orientation center, vocational training workshops, a recreation center and a medical dispensary. A dining room was also located on the premises where meals were served in a cafeteria style.

Advice and supervision in the dormitories were provided by men with training and/or experience in sociology or youth work. A psychologist was available as well as religious services with chaplains, including a Catholic priest and a Protestant minister.

The placement of graduates from the training center would be around 80%. There was also a tracking program to keep track of graduating students and their success so that improvements in certain classes could be made.

Don E. Watson, director of MVVS, testified to the school’s success in 1966 before the House of Representatives General Subcommittee on Education during consideration of the 1966 Professional Amendments.

In 1967, Watson gave another testimonial in hopes of obtaining funds for the expansion of the program. At that time, the maximum capacity of MVVS was 485 students at a time with an annual enrollment of approximately 900 students from across the state. The cost of the school per student was expected to be $3,500 in 1967, whereas in previous years the cost was around $2,500 per student.

By 1969, over 2,000 students had graduated from MVVS since it opened. Even though the program was considered a success and operated more economically than the Job Corps program at the time, the Department of Labor withheld future funding, causing its closure in August 1970.



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Taconic High School Explains Plans to Become a Comprehensive Vocational School, Providing Technical Education to Students in Its Future | Berkshires Center https://malenyceltic.org/taconic-high-school-explains-plans-to-become-a-comprehensive-vocational-school-providing-technical-education-to-students-in-its-future-berkshires-center/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/taconic-high-school-explains-plans-to-become-a-comprehensive-vocational-school-providing-technical-education-to-students-in-its-future-berkshires-center/ PITTSFIELD – Taconic High School in Pittsfield could become a comprehensive vocational school, exclusively enrolling students seeking vocational and technical courses. The move would mean that starting in the fall of 2023, Taconic would only enroll students in career and technical education classes — known as CTE in shorthand — in its freshman class. The […]]]>

PITTSFIELD – Taconic High School in Pittsfield could become a comprehensive vocational school, exclusively enrolling students seeking vocational and technical courses.

The move would mean that starting in the fall of 2023, Taconic would only enroll students in career and technical education classes — known as CTE in shorthand — in its freshman class.

The school would not have full CTE students until fall 2026, allowing the last class of non-CTE students, who will be freshmen this year, to graduate.

Trustees say the move would help fund CTE programs and thus provide students with more opportunities. It would also help Pittsfield High School with its enrollment, as non-CTE students could enroll there as a next step.

The conversion to a full vocational school is still a long way off. Administrators will need to hold listening sessions with students, families and community stakeholders and ultimately bring the issue to a vote for the Pittsfield School Committee. For now, they have presented their plans for the school.

CTE classes provide students with technical skills, certifications, and job training for a specific profession while emphasizing academics.

This is a common path for students who want to work in technical fields, such as construction, health services, initial education, manufacturing, and information technology, among others.

“We want to start viewing CTE as a focused, rigorous elective path that has these lifelong benefits for our students,” said Taconic Principal Matthew Bishop.

Among these benefits is the ability for students to complete with college credit or advanced placement in their fields of study, as well as industry-recognized certifications.

Taconic’s enrollment trends have seen consistent increases for CTE courses over the years. In the 2022-2023 school year, only 45 out of 236 students in its incoming freshman class will be non-CTE students.

Tammy Gage, assistant superintendent for college and career readiness at Pittsfield Public Schools, said the change would help manage the costs of CTE courses, which quickly add up.

Between mechanical equipment, maintenance and repair, licensing, safety and personal protective equipment and more, CTE classes tend to receive higher state reimbursements, Gage said.

“Professional education is expensive,” Gage said. “By limiting enrollment at Taconic, where we might be heading, we are reducing the funds needed to maintain these programs for a state-of-the-art school that was built with taxpayer dollars.”

The plans would also go towards helping Pittsfield High School enroll. Over the past five years, Taconic has gained 126 students and Pittsfield High has lost 189 students.

If Taconic became a full vocational school, Pittsfield High would accommodate a number of its non-CTE students. Some students would also have the option of going elsewhere.

The change would also give non-CTE students more options for electives and internships, Pittsfield High School principal Henry Duval said. Moving non-CTE freshmen to Pittsfield High, where class sizes have been shrinking over the years, would be mutually beneficial, he said.

Still, some committee members were concerned that Pittsfield High needed renovations before taking on the additional responsibility of students.

School board vice-chairman Daniel Elias said he has no doubts the Taconic program is a success, but noted that some physical attributes of Pittsfield High School, such as carpeting, tiling and parts of the original building, needed to be updated before more students were diverted there.

“If you fix an old car but you don’t fix the engine, you still have an old car,” Elias said.

Committee Chairman William Cameron also expressed concerns about the transition period, noting that Taconic administrators would “essentially be running two schools in the same building” as non-CTE classes would be phased out.

Bishop argued that, as things stand, he is “essentially running three schools” due to scheduling issues. CTE students in grades 9 and 10 follow a different timetable than their counterparts in grades 11 and 12, and non-CTE students also follow a different timetable, which essentially results in three timetables with some inefficiencies.

Focusing on the CTE program would allow for more flexibility in students’ schedules, he said, and provide them with more opportunities for different classes.

Committee members were receptive to the plans. Elias said he liked the focus on this particular group of students. Committee member Sara Hathaway also shared an anecdote about a student she met a few years ago who said, “I only go to school because they let me weld stuff “.

Focusing more on those options will help children find a way forward, she said.

“Take welding and the love of welding and build it,” Hathaway said. “He would have been in that building all day if those options had found him.”

Administrators plan to hold listening sessions with students, families and potential speakers over the next few months.

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CDC dedicates a self-funded vocational school https://malenyceltic.org/cdc-dedicates-a-self-funded-vocational-school/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 13:41:15 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/cdc-dedicates-a-self-funded-vocational-school/ The ruling Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC) has dedicated its own self-funded professional and technical institution to help support the Liberian government’s efforts in preparing young people for the job market. Located at CDC party headquarters in Monrovia, the vocational school was recently dedicated and named after one of the party stalwarts, the late Munah […]]]>

The ruling Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC) has dedicated its own self-funded professional and technical institution to help support the Liberian government’s efforts in preparing young people for the job market.

Located at CDC party headquarters in Monrovia, the vocational school was recently dedicated and named after one of the party stalwarts, the late Munah Pelham Youngblood, former Montserrado County Representative.

Youngblood, the youngest member of the Liberian Legislative Assembly, has twice been elected as the representative for District 9 of Montserrado. She was a representative from 2011 to 2020, the year of her disappearance. Although it is common for Liberian politicians as individuals to erect schools and guarantee scholarships for their constituents, this may be the first time in Liberian history that a political party has built a professional institution.

Deputy Speaker of the House of Representatives, Cllr. Jonathan Fonati Koffa, who was a guest speaker at the dedication program, described the CDC as the youngest liberation movement in the history of Africa, while paying tribute to President George M. Weah, the visionary of the left.

Vice President Koffa affirmed that the establishment of professional and technical studies is the first in the history of political parties in Liberia.

“It is amazing to see in these contexts where we are not talking about armed struggle as necessary, but we are talking about a struggle for empowerment, a struggle to free your mind, a struggle to give you independence of thought and of action,” says Kofa.

“Never in the history of a political party has an institution dreamed of saying that we’re not just going to build supporters to say A-woo dire! (battle cry), or to come and see the leaders for alms, but we want to build supporters who are also empowered – to be able to fend for themselves so that they’re not just given, but can give back to the institution. political history that we are talking about. I challenge and challenge anyone to come here with an example that is also in Liberia,” Koffa said.

The vice president, who is now a ruling CDC official, was once the chairman of the Freedom Party and briefly courted the former ruling Unity Party. He said that in all his political life, he had never seen such a significant project undertaken by a political party in Liberia.

He attributed the party’s landmark achievement to the selfless efforts of the party’s “young revolutionaries” who made the ultimate sacrifice over the years.

“We have been in political institutions,” he said. “We tried to build a political party. We have never seen anything like this happening here today. We give all the praise to young revolutionaries and emerging leaders. We have all seen their struggles, the sacrifices they have made. They should have done something to improve their lives, but they put their lives on the line to get us here.

He called on students to seize the opportunity for a better future and pledged his unwavering support to the institution.

The event was graced by senior officials, including lawmakers and guests. South Africa’s Ambassador to Liberia, Professor Iqbal Jhazbhay also graced the occasion, which revealed that discussions were underway with the Vice-Chancellor of the University of South Africa to support the new professional institution.

According to Prof. Jhazbhay, the Chancellor has agreed on behalf of the University to form a partnership with ‘Munah Tech’ for the benefit of students in digital and professional disciplines.

He then recounted the long-standing relationship between Liberia and South Africa; in particular the extensive support that Liberia extended to the leaders of the anti-apartheid movement and the African National Congress (ANC) during their liberation struggle.

Meanwhile, Party Chairman Mulbah K. Morlu thanked President Weah for his vision and the supporters for supporting the project through payment of dues and donations.

“It’s the product of the sweat and dues-paying ability of party members. It is the professional party institution of which you can be proud. Thank you to all supporters for their contributions – CDC USA, Europe and Australia.”

He said that although the school belongs to the Party, it will open its doors to all Liberians, regardless of their affiliations. According to him, Munah Tech will be “completely free” for the many young supporters who aspire to professional skills.

He thanked the South African Ambassador to Liberia for soliciting support on behalf of the vocational school and expressed hope that the proposed partnership will benefit the students. He noted that the CDC’s founding fathers were inspired by the ANC’s fight for freedom.

“You (ANC) are the inspiration that gave birth to us (CDC) to provide basic social services and economic freedom to our people and our country. We are honored to have you seated here less than 100 feet from our sycamore, which recalls the history and the sacrifice of all the revolutionaries who left and who are still alive. We say thank you for being there. We hope that the institution will do everything possible to work with the school said President Morlu, addressing the Ambassador.

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Ruling CDC dedicates vocational school named after late Rep. Munah Pelham Youngblood – FrontPageAfrica https://malenyceltic.org/ruling-cdc-dedicates-vocational-school-named-after-late-rep-munah-pelham-youngblood-frontpageafrica/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 10:25:52 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/ruling-cdc-dedicates-vocational-school-named-after-late-rep-munah-pelham-youngblood-frontpageafrica/ MONROVIA- It was a moment full of joy and happiness for hundreds of young Liberians and stalwarts of the ruling Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC) on Saturday during a program marking the official inauguration and orientation of the Institute. Munah Pelham Youngblood of Vocational and Technical Studies, Munah Technique for short. The school, named after […]]]>

MONROVIA- It was a moment full of joy and happiness for hundreds of young Liberians and stalwarts of the ruling Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC) on Saturday during a program marking the official inauguration and orientation of the Institute. Munah Pelham Youngblood of Vocational and Technical Studies, Munah Technique for short.

The school, named after the stalwart and pioneer of the late CDC, is being built at the party’s national headquarters in Monrovia to provide technical and vocational education to all young Liberians.

Delivering the keynote address, Deputy Speaker of the House of Representatives, Cllr. Jonathan Fonati Koffa described the CDC as the youngest liberation movement in the history of Africa and paid tribute to President Weah, the visionary of the institution and the pillars of the party for the establishment of the institution, which, according to him, is the first in the history of political parties. .

“It’s amazing to see in these contexts where we’re not talking about arm wrestling as necessary, but we’re talking about a struggle of empowerment, a struggle to free your mind, a struggle to give yourself a independence of thought and action,” enthused Vice-President Koffa.

“Never in the history of a political party has an institution dreamed of saying we’re not just going to build supporters to say A-woo say! [shout battle cry], or to come to leaders for alms, but we want to build followers who are also empowered – to be able to fend for themselves so that they are not just donated, but can give back to the institution . And this is political history that we are talking about. I challenged and challenged anyone to come here with an example that is also in Liberia.

The vice president, now a ruling CDC official, was once the chairman of the Freedom Party and flirted with the former ruling Unity Party.

Speaking further, he noted that in all his political life, he had never seen such a significant project being undertaken by a political party. He attributed the party’s landmark achievement to the selfless efforts of the party’s “young revolutionaries” who made the ultimate sacrifice over the years.

He said: “We have been in a political institution. We tried to build a political party. We’ve never seen anything like it – that’s what’s happening here today. We give full praise to the young revolutionaries and emerging leaders here today. They were chained and in hangers. We have all seen their struggles, the sacrifices they have made. They should have done something to make their lives better, but they put their lives on the line to get us here today.

He called on students to seize the opportunity for a better future and pledged his unwavering support to the institution.

The event was graced by senior officials, including lawmakers and guests. One of them, the South African Ambassador, Professor Iqbal Jhazbhay revealed that he had discussions with the Vice-Chancellor of the University of South Africa and she had accepted, on behalf of the University, to form a partnership with Munah Tech for the benefit of students. in digital and professional disciplines.

He then recounted the long-standing relationship between Liberia and South Africa; especially the many supporters in Liberia given to leaders of the anti-apartheid movement and the African National Congress (ANC) during their liberation struggle.

Party Chairman, Mulbah K. Morlue thanked President Weah for his vision and the supporters for supporting the project through due payments and donations.

“It is the product of the sweat and ability to pay of party members. It is the party-owned professional institution of which you can be proud. Thanks to all supporters for their contribution – CDC USA, Europe and Australia.

He said that although the school is owned by the Party, it will open its doors to all Liberians regardless of their affiliations.

He thanked the South African Ambassador to Liberia for soliciting support on behalf of the vocational school and expressed hope that the proposed partnership will benefit the students.

He noted that the founding fathers of the CDC drew inspiration from the ANC in its fight for freedom.

“You (ANC) are the inspiration that gave birth to us (CDC) to provide basic social services and economic freedom to our people and our country. We are honored to have you seated here less than 100 feet from our sycamore which recalls the history and the sacrifice of all the revolutionaries who left and who are still alive. We say thank you for being there. We hope that the institution will do everything possible to work with the school” , said President Morlue, addressing the ambassador.

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Fighting to Keep B. Davison School Vocational School Open https://malenyceltic.org/fighting-to-keep-b-davison-school-vocational-school-open/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 10:06:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/fighting-to-keep-b-davison-school-vocational-school-open/ School board administrators were in the hot seat over the future of vocational programs offered at B. Davison High School. At Tuesday night’s special meeting of the Thames Valley District School Board (TVDSB), administrators repeatedly asked staff to explain dwindling enrollment and the proposed “reorientation” of the secondary school which offers a job-oriented training in […]]]>

School board administrators were in the hot seat over the future of vocational programs offered at B. Davison High School.

At Tuesday night’s special meeting of the Thames Valley District School Board (TVDSB), administrators repeatedly asked staff to explain dwindling enrollment and the proposed “reorientation” of the secondary school which offers a job-oriented training in fields such as welding, hospitality, horticulture and cosmetology. .

Director of Education Mark Fisher suggested that a public process to consider reorienting the school would help address the steady decline in enrolment, adding that similar courses are offered in some traditional high schools which better prepare students. college or trade school students.

“There’s no conspiracy here,” Fisher told the school board and the gallery of more than 40 concerned parents, educators and alumni. “What we’re trying to do here is what’s best for our children and our communities – period.”

Only five students expressed interest in attending B. Davison in the previous two years—an insufficient number to start a new ninth-grade class.

The school’s current students in grades 11 and 12 will graduate in 2023 and 2024.

Trustees pressed the administration to explain whether the drop in enrollment was the result of student choice or a lack of awareness of the professional program offered at B. Davison.

In 2013, the TVDSB adopted requests to the administration:

  • That every effort be made to expand and improve program offerings at B. Davison
  • That a regular review of the programs offered at B. Davison and Technology Emphasis High Schools be undertaken to ensure that the needs of students and future employment opportunities in the community are considered.
  • That it be required that detailed written information about Emphasis Secondary Schools and B. Davison technology and any other program offerings, depending on the region, be sent to parents/guardians of 7th and 8th grade students in here November each year .

“We were committed to providing seventh and eighth graders with written information about Davison as a program (grade 9 option),” said councilor Sherri Moore.

TVDSB Director of Education Mark Fisher at the board meeting on July 12, 2022. (Daryl Newcombe/CTV News London)Fisher said the motion was passed before he was hired by the school board, and over the past few years, “We haven’t campaigned to encourage kids to take part in this program, but we do have done nothing to discourage them.”

Fisher’s responses often stirred the school’s supporters who filled the public gallery.

Judith Callahan of the group ‘Keep Davison Secondary School Open’ is concerned about the success of students who may be required to attend traditional high schools.

“They get lost in a regular high school, they get lost and fall through the cracks,” she told CTV News.

The school is named after Janine Davison’s father, Basil, a lifelong educator.

“They can be successful, but they just don’t learn in a college setting, they sort of sit at a desk,” Davison explained.

Former student Matthew Burns said the small class sizes and personalized teaching helped him succeed: “It was like a big family there. That’s what I love about it.

After more than three hours, TVDSB administrators assigned administrative duties in the form of three reports with tight deadlines.

In September, the administration will report on its adherence to the 2013 motion supporting professional training.

In October, a report will offer “creative solutions” to support current B. Davison students given low enrollment.

In January 2023, a report will quantify student success in locally developed and workplace programs at B. Davison High School and other TVDSB locations.

After repeatedly criticizing TVDSB’s governance, Deputy Mayor of Thames Center Kelly Elliott said she was pleased that the trustees were keeping the administration’s feet on fire.

“The board really held them accountable. If that changes anything, I don’t know, because now we’re pushing those reports to January 2023,” Elliot said.

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Politician tears up public school board brass amid vocational schools furor https://malenyceltic.org/politician-tears-up-public-school-board-brass-amid-vocational-schools-furor/ Sat, 09 Jul 2022 17:17:32 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/politician-tears-up-public-school-board-brass-amid-vocational-schools-furor/ Breadcrumb Links Local News The public school board‘s management of B. Davison Secondary School in London is part of a larger problem with senior management, a local politician accuses.]]>

The public school board‘s management of B. Davison Secondary School in London is part of a larger problem with senior management, a local politician accuses.

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The public school board‘s management of B. Davison Secondary School in London is part of a larger problem with its senior management, according to a local politician.

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“There’s this continuing trend of senior management doing whatever they want. The board is left in the dark and its decisions are not respected by the administration,” Thames Center Deputy Mayor Kelly Elliott said on Friday. “From a larger perspective, it’s a larger issue that needs to be addressed.”

The B. Davison problem is just one of many examples of senior Thames Valley administration ignoring the will of administrators over the past year, Elliott said, citing the closure of a task force on the rural schools which she strongly supported and the staff refusing to set up an administrators. ‘vote requiring masks in schools.

Elliott doesn’t expect the public to have a say Tuesday at a special meeting called by the Thames Valley District School Board about B. Davison, a vocational school whose future has been under scrutiny. the spotlight amid a series of Free Press articles from those concerned, it may close.

“My hunch is that it will be the staff telling the administrators what they said to the media this week,” Elliott said. “The agenda doesn’t really explain anything. And the public never gets reports until the day of the meeting. »

The only way the public could get official status was to appear before a board committee a month ago, she said. “There is no way for a delegation to be approved.”

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But organizers of a campaign to save school curricula are still calling on members of the public to come out in force on Tuesday. Nearly 600 people have signed an online petition in support of the school, according to the group’s Facebook page, Keep Davison Secondary School Open.

The meeting is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. at the Thames Valley Education Center at 1250 Dundas Street. The only item on the agenda is B. Davison High School.

As first reported in The Free Press a week ago, parents and supporters are concerned about the council’s plans for vocational training programs at school. Several sources told The Free Press that the Thames Valley administration stopped accepting pupils into Year 9 programs two years ago.

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Thames Valley Director of Education Mark Fisher denies acceptances have stopped.

But Elliott said she had been working behind the scenes on the issue for several months and had heard from three parents and two teachers that it was.

In a recent Free Press interview, Fisher said B. Davison’s education model is slowing the progress of his students, who can now choose similar programs at their local high schools. The school will not close, but it could offer different programs, including alternative education, he said.

“I would like to see the metrics on how they define success at B. Davidson because it’s not like any other school,” Elliott said Friday.

“The stories coming out of the graduates of Davison’s programs show that it’s a successful program, there’s a need. To put it so simply that the school is not doing well because on paper they don’t meet those parameters, I think that’s really unfair to both the students and the staff there.

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Parents and former students have reached out to the media in London with similar stories of how B. Davison transformed their lives by providing a place where they felt comfortable learning.

B. Davison School opened in September 2014 as a merger of the former Sir George Ross and Thames Secondary Vocational Schools, on the Thames School site on Trafalgar Street.

The school offers workplace courses in hospitality, welding, construction, auto mechanics, horticulture, and cosmetology, as well as co-op courses and some academic courses. Many courses help students enter the job market directly after graduation.

richmond@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/RandyRatLFPress

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Top educator speaks out on future of London vocational school amid closure fears https://malenyceltic.org/top-educator-speaks-out-on-future-of-london-vocational-school-amid-closure-fears/ Thu, 07 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://malenyceltic.org/top-educator-speaks-out-on-future-of-london-vocational-school-amid-closure-fears/ Breadcrumb Links Local News A London vocational school at the center of protests over its future has limited the progress of many pupils and needs to change, says the head of education for the Thames Valley District School Board. Mark Fisher is Director of Education for the Thames Valley District School Board. (Mike Hensen/The London […]]]>

A London vocational school at the center of protests over its future has limited the progress of many pupils and needs to change, says the head of education for the Thames Valley District School Board.

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A London vocational school at the center of protests over its future has limited the progress of many pupils and needs to change, says the head of education for the Thames Valley District School Board.

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But B. Davison High School will not be closed, and it could become a place where students learn “in a non-traditional way,” Mark Fisher said.

The vocational programs offered for decades at the school are offered at schools in the Thames Valley, he said in an interview with The Free Press on Wednesday.

“What we are trying to do now is to make sure that, as much as possible, children can go to their own school and get the kind of programs they need. At the same time, we are going to set up an alt ed (alternative education) program for some of these children who prefer to learn in different ways,” he said.

“We will be looking, in consultation with the general public, at what some of these non-traditional methods are and how can we use B. Davison’s site.”

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Dozens of alumni and parents have contacted the London Free Press, saying B. Davison and his predecessors, Thames and Sir George Ross, have enabled them to succeed in ways that other large traditional schools could not.

But Fisher said that’s not the case for many students.

Literacy and other assessments of B. Davison’s students found “that many of these children, in fact, were far more capable than the program offerings available at Davison.” So when they went to B. Davison, their likelihood of going to college or the trades was diminished. said Fisher.

“We have a moral obligation to ensure that every student in our system achieves their full potential. And frankly, that didn’t happen with B. Davison.

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Enrollment at B. Davison has been declining for several years, from 260 students in 2014 to 130 in 2019, Fisher said.

He denied claims from sources within the board and from parents that the board had stopped accepting Year 9 students for the past two years.

“There hasn’t been a formal halt to enrollment,” Fisher said.

The parents and daughters of the late Basil Davison, a former teacher and school namesake, took to social media in late June to protest and rally against the school’s closure or the end of its professional programming.

Former pupils provided The Free Press with a common refrain: they fit in nowhere else but at Sir George Ross and Thames Schools, which were merged into the Thames site and renamed B. Davison in 2014.

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Jennifer Escaf said that after grade 8 she tried four different secondary schools before going to Thames in the late 1980s.

“It was the first time in my life that I was not ostracized. I fitted in and the teachers and the program were phenomenal,” she said on Wednesday. “This place really changed my mind about school and taught me how to learn in a special way. You get thrown through the cracks at other schools.

Everyone deserves a good education, said former pupil Pamela McConnell, who had children in daycare while in Thames in the 1980s.

“In regular school, where they feel like they can’t make it, some students won’t get the education they would get from a school like Davison,” she said.

Despite the protest and an online petition, Fisher defended the board’s handling of its communications about B. Davison with parents and others.

“There is a lot of false information that has been spread here,” he said. “We have had virtually no contact with any concerned parents.”

richmond@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/RandyRatLFPress

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comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. Visit our Community Rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

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