Skip to main content

Windy City Revival: How One FM Transformed Chicago’s Public School Facilities

By Public school


Clarence Carson reorganized the management of facilities in Chicago public schools. The results were a more efficient operation and happier occupants.






Clarence Carson was only acting as an involved parent when his young daughter appointed him PTA treasurer at his small Chicago school. He had no idea Kristina was putting him on a career path he never saw coming.

“I went from treasurer of PTA to director of facilities (CFO) in the third largest school district in the country,” says Carson.

The path was not so easy. But Carson’s experience in building and managing facilities, combined with his successful efforts to lead the necessary upgrades in an aging small school, caught the attention of Chicago Public School (CPS) officials who wanted that he transforms an entire neighborhood as he did for Kristina. school, McDade Classical, in the South District of Chicago.

“I was looking for a rock star, knowing that facilities management was a major vulnerability for the school district,” says Arnie Rivera, then COO at CPS. “Clarence did not apply and had no interest. I looked for it. I don’t think he was in a real rush to do it.

On the radar

CPS was in a bad spot when Rivera was hired as COO in February 2018. The district was receiving tons of bad publicity and its reputation was in tatters.

“Three weeks into my tenure as COO, things exploded,” says Rivera, now director of administration and equity at Navy Pier in Chicago. “(We had) front page stories about school filth, and I was like, we can’t have this. It cannot be a major vulnerability point for our district.

The CFO position at CPS was a revolving door, which didn’t help matters. At least four different people have held the position since 2014, “none of them had experience in facility management,” says Rivera.

This was a great opportunity for Carson, who had a solid background in facilities management, starting with his education at Michigan State University, where he studied construction and facility management, and earned a master’s degree in facility management. construction with a minor in urban renewal planning. After graduating, he worked for years in the private and public sectors, mainly in Chicago.

“It’s not a huge nationwide degree program. It’s pretty rare and I was the only minority, non-white student in my undergrad and the only one of two Americans in my graduate program, ”says Carson, who sits on the board of the alumni council. state for the construction management program and created a mentoring program for African-American students in college. “It’s something I really wanted to do. I followed the progress on campus. I worked at the physical factory as a carpenter and ended up being a project manager, actually managing construction projects on campus. As part of the graduate program, I was a teaching assistant and graduate assistant.

Carson’s involvement in his daughter’s school couldn’t have been more timely. As Rivera settled into his new role, Carson impressed district leaders with the work he did at McDade and two other small CPS schools, where he led renovations to expand schools to teach until in the 8th year from the 6th year. To sell the projects, Carson focused on communication between parents, students, faculty, and staff, and ultimately pushed his proposals through.

“At the time, they told me it could never be done,” Carson says. “I established a quote, design schedule and overall plan, and conducted a survey of all students and staff, administration and nearby community as well as community leaders. I was able to put us all on the same page about how school should work.

The projects have turned heads.

“After the presentation (to Dade), the chairman of the board looked at me and said, ‘Who are you?’ and I just said ‘I’m a dad trying to help school,’ ”Carson says.

All three projects were approved in May 2018, and over the next month CPS set their sights on Carson for a larger role, offering him the role of CFO.

“They said they wanted me to do what I did in these schools, listen to the principals, listen to the teachers, listen to the community and take a thoughtful approach to building management and building improvements, and” we would like you to do this for all of our buildings, ”Carson says.

Task

CPC faces many challenges that public school districts face, such as lack of funding and significant deferred maintenance backlogs. At CPS, deferred maintenance totals reach $ 3.5 billion and many of its buildings are 80 years or older.

In a neighborhood of 600 campuses and 1,300 buildings covering 69 million square feet and serving 355,000 students and 50,000 faculty and staff, changing lanes can take some time.

Carson’s main challenge was to regain control of facilities management, which was outsourced to large vendors in a business model known as the Integrated Facilities Management model.

“One of the main areas that I saw that needed improvement was all of our services in the facilities department,” Carson said. “We ran into several issues where some of our district’s top complaints were with the facilities department, ranging from pest control issues, cleanliness of facilities, response to building repairs, and delays. These are major issues that I was familiar with as a parent in the community. “

After asking district directors about how they thought the facilities department was working, Carson contacted schools near and far to determine what the best approach was. The district has finally adopted a model facilities management office, which will come into full effect in October when existing contracts with suppliers expire.

While CPS will continue to rely on third-party companies for tasks such as cleaning within the district, Carson has expanded the infrastructure within the department, adding directors and managers so that district leaders have more monitoring.

“Based on this model, I was able to change the staffing within our department,” says Carson. “When I first came here, there was mainly a facility manager, an operations manager, and that was it. This naturally did not relate to the key services within our ministry, and it did not create the pillars of leadership in each of these areas. I have reorganized our department and created several new positions to help us be successful.

Carson has added new positions such as directors of environmental safety and directors of energy and sustainability, as well as senior staff in staffing operations, project controls, project management and logistics. .

“We’re going to grow this team, have longer tentacles and provide even more control, more transparency, through direct control over contracts through our departments,” said Carson.




Related topics:

comments

Source link

Oklahoma State University named among Best Public Schools in U.S. News and Global Report

By Public school

Oklahoma State University has maintained its strong position among the Top 100 Public Schools over the past American News and World ReportThe list of top university rankings is released this week.

In the overall category of top national university, OSU tied for 187 out of nearly 400 schools, both public and private. OSU ranked even higher – 96th – as best public school. As a Best Value School, OSU is ranked 156th, overtaking the University of Oklahoma (# 177) and the University of Texas (# 186).

The largest increase for the university came in the Best Colleges for Veterans category, where OSU has gained 24 spots from 2021. OSU now sits 121st in this category.

OSU comes in second in the Big 12 Conference behind Kansas State University in the A-Plus Schools for B Students category. This category is compiled according to a number of criteria, including ranking in the top three-quarters of all of the best colleges. Another is having an average retention rate of 75 percent or more in first grade, among other things. In the A Plus Schools for B Students category, OSU placed 53rd overall.

For undergraduate rankings, OSU’s Spears School of Business is tied for 84th overall in business school rankings and 32nd for its entrepreneurship program.

OSU’s undergraduate engineering program ranks 96th overall, and the computer science undergraduate program is tied for 154th.

American News and World Report is the world authority in education rankings. In its 37th year, the ranking assesses more than 1,400 colleges and universities on up to 17 measures of academic quality.

To see the American News and World Report Ranking of the best colleges 2022, go to okla.st/2022rankings.

In other ranking news, Princeton Review lists OSU as one of best colleges in the western region.


This press release was produced by Oklahoma State University. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.

Source link

Do athletes have to choose between university and stadium? – Living in Switzerland Guide

By University

One third of Swiss athletes who took part in the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 were students or university graduates. Outside the stadium, it is “normal” students who have to juggle between lessons and high-level sports training.

According to a new study “Elite Sport in Switzerland 2019”, 47% of athletes aged 25 to 34 have a higher education diploma (from a university or a vocational high school). That’s 5 percentage points lower than the rest of the population in the same age group. But it’s still a fairly high figure, explains Simon Niepmann, a former rowing champion who heads the “Elite Sport and Studies” program for Swiss Olympic, the umbrella organization for Swiss sport. An Olympic gold medalist himself, he managed to successfully complete his studies in sport and geography at the University of Basel, earning a bachelor’s degree in five years instead of three.

As its name suggests, the support program it runs aims to enable athletes to embark on a dual career. As part of the program launched in 2014, a network of 42 people is responsible for helping athletes reconcile the demands of competitive sport with their studies. These contact persons are located in almost all Swiss universities and help athletes plan their studies and their sports career years in advance.

“Elite sport and studies”

In 2014, Swiss Olympic launched the “Elite Sport and Studies” project in collaboration with Swiss University Sports – the umbrella organization of university sports clubs. The project became a program in 2017 and has been affiliated with Swiss Olympic since 2018. Swiss Olympic and Swiss University Sports have a close cooperation on this issue.

Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities – the conference of rectors of Swiss universities – signed a declaration in 2017. Their main objectives are to promote optional part-time studies, to lengthen courses and to reduce attendance requirements for athletes from competition.

In 2020, the two organizations signed a second declaration, adding the option of distance learning independent of time and place, which worked well with the study conditions imposed by the Covid.

SWI swissinfo.ch: Why was there hardly any organized support in Switzerland for student-athletes until a few years ago?

Simon Niepmann: In the past, student-athletes were extremely autonomous. During my studies, I noticed that in Switzerland, no difference was made between students who practiced elite sports, those who practiced a hobby or those who had a job in parallel with their course. All were considered part-time jobs. It was entirely up to the athletes to organize the time needed to train for their sport in addition to their studies.

In Switzerland, sport is now seen more and more as a full-time professional activity, even if its status is not yet comparable to that of other countries, where being a sportsman is considered as a profession like any other.

SWI: What is the question that young athletes ask you most often?

SN: The most frequent question is: “I play high level national or international sport. What type of diploma training is an option for me?

Of course, I cannot give a general answer, because all athletes can study business or law. I have to look at each case individually. It depends on the field of study that the athletes are interested in, the demands of their sport, but also where they train and the flexibility offered by the university concerned.

SWI: What is the main support you can offer to student-athletes?

SN: Advance planning. This means starting at an early age to combine competitive sports and study. For example, it is necessary to identify the phases where the studies will require a lot of time and the phases of intensive training.

Ideally, schedule a schedule until graduation – the schedule can be readjusted every six months.

Our main task is to make athletes aware that they have to plan and that there are different people who can help them on their two-lane journey.

SWI: An analysis of the Swiss Olympic study in 2018 shows that top student-athletes are rarely registered as sportsmen or sportswomen when they are admitted to university.

SN: We are faced with two problems. On the one hand, we do not have access to information on all athletes regarding their education; on the other hand, universities do not always know which students are involved in competitive sports. We have a lot of room for improvement in this area.

What we try to do is keep competitive athletes informed, as often and as widely as possible, whether through newsletters, sports clubs or other channels.

We have also noticed that there is often a desire for discussion between student-athletes and young athletes still in high school. If athletes are talking to each other, there is less inhibition in asking simple questions than if they are talking to someone from a college official. We have created an online platform to facilitate this exchange.

SWI: The 2020 statement from Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities makes it clear that not all sports are compatible with all training courses. Which sports-study combinations are particularly difficult?

SN: I would hesitate to say that a certain sport does not work at all with a certain university subject, because it is always important to take into account that it is a very personal choice.

But we notice that winter sportsmen tend to study at a distance. The point is, they’re on the road all season, so they can’t regularly attend a class in person.

In terms of subjects, the most difficult for athletes are certainly those where there is a high proportion of practical work or laboratory lessons where students have to be in a certain place at a certain time.

SWI: The United States and China have long been at the top of the Olympic Games medal rankings. In China, for example, competitive athletes have the opportunity to focus on sports and then obtain favorable conditions for admission to a prestigious university. Are Swiss athletes at a disadvantage compared to competitors from these countries because they are forced to combine studies and sport?

SN: We believe that in a number of cases it is useful for athletes to train alongside their studies. Partly because there are a number of hours in the day that are not devoted to sport and where athletes can do other things, and also because studying is a cognitive distraction that motivates athletes to a higher level. different way.

An environment outside of the sporting world is also important for many athletes. It allows for a change of pace and can be rewarding and calming. Preparation for a post-sports career is also a very important point. When you stop playing sports, it is essential to have a second place to invest your energy and develop.

SWI: How does Switzerland rank in a global comparison in terms of support for student-athletes?

SN: We prefer to compare ourselves to countries of similar size. There are always different approaches. In Norway, sports associations collaborate with specific universities. So there you know more or less that if you play a certain sport, there is a university that cooperates with the national association or the Olympic committee.

With our network of coordinators in Switzerland, we want to show that athletes do not have to limit their options. We prefer to try to keep all options open. It is a process that we will continue to work on.

SWI: Is a dual career in competitive sport and school more a story of compromise, or a win-win situation?

SN: It’s definitely a compromise because you can’t commit 100% to sport and 100% to your studies at the same time. You have to plan and find a balance. Still, I wouldn’t say it devalues ​​both aspects. Studying at the same time doesn’t necessarily mean less success in sports – it often even means the opposite.

Source link

SDL Surveying Partners with University for Learning Program

By University

The national home survey and assessment company, SDL Surveying, has released details of its new apprenticeship program which is run in conjunction with Nottingham Trent University.

The Level 6 Chartered Surveyor (Real Estate) Diploma Apprenticeship is designed both for school leavers and for existing employees within companies who currently do not have a relevant degree, and SDL Surveying will work with the university to guide students through the professional and theoretical content of the course.

Students are placed in SDL Surveying for a period of five years. During years one to three, they will be rotated in various departments of the company, which will provide them with comprehensive business knowledge and experience.

During the fourth and fifth years, they will work with SDL’s audit and technical teams to acquire more specific surveying knowledge.

At the end of the five years, they will have obtained a university degree and MRICS accreditation.

SDL currently has three apprentice surveyors taking the course in its Nottingham offices, Tom Walford, Caitlin True and James Morris, and the company is committed to developing opportunities for many more students to take the course in the years to come. to come.

Simon Jackson, Managing Director of SDL Surveying, said: “This is a brand new initiative for SDL Surveying and we are working closely with Nottingham Trent University to run a great course and ensure our apprentices have the type of learning and experience they need to start their career as a surveyor. We are delighted that Tom, Caitlin and James are currently working in our Nottingham office as first students and they will learn all there is to know about what we do and what is required as a surveyor.

“There is always a shortage of excellent surveyors, and we believe that with this course we will train an increasing number of next generation professionals who will set the highest standards in the work they do. These three are just the first of many to benefit from this new program.

Source link

Augmented and virtual reality at the University of Applied Sciences Lucerne

By University

Lucerne University of Applied Sciences

Opening of a new virtual reality center in Rotcruz

At the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, the virtual now merges with reality. Schools, SMEs and students should benefit from the new offers.

With a new augmented and virtual reality center, the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences wants to bring new technologies closer to schools and businesses. To this end, it is opening the Center for Immersive Realities (IRC) within the IT department of the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences in Rotkreuz, a statement said.

Both technologies will be used in more and more industries. However, many SMEs and schools are not sure what added value it will bring and whether the investments will be worth it. “Together with the Center, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts offers a low profile to businesses and educational institutions in the region.” One of the goals is that companies can implement projects with the university. “Such projects include, among others, virtual training environments where employees of SMEs learn new procedures for working on complex devices in a secure environment,” the university wrote.

IRC introduces itself.

Video: Lucerne University of Applied Sciences

The potential is also high in the education sector. For example, the work of human organs or complex processes such as electrical circuits can be transmitted more vividly and vividly than traditional learning materials, it is said. “Both technologies offer users a new form of interaction. For example, if the objects can be seen from all sides through virtual reality glasses and are within easy reach, then it is not only a different experience, but also a pleasant experience.

A preview of the new presentation of the Immersive Reality Center:

Showroom and interaction space: A wide range of augmented reality and virtual reality infrastructures as well as tools are available for visitors to familiarize themselves with the technologies.

Projects and advice: Small and medium-sized enterprises can implement their projects with the staff of the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Lucerne and use the infrastructure of the Immersive Reality Center.

Training and Development : The center offers general, semi-public and internal training in AR and VR. There is also close collaboration with vocational schools in the central Switzerland region. The first training project has already been launched with the Zug Industrial Commercial Training Center (GIBZ).

Networks: The immersive reality center is a meeting and networking place for people interested in augmented reality and virtual reality

Augmented and virtual reality is also gaining more weight at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences: in the autumn semester 2021, he will start specializing in augmented and virtual reality in the IT department. The practical part of the training takes place in specially equipped rooms at IRC. (dlw / ma)


Frank McCarthy

“Certified gamer. Problem solver. Internet enthusiast. Twitter scholar. Extremely humble alcohol geek. TV guru.”


Source link

UM named best public school in the state for English and history – Shelby County Reporter

By Public school

By NEAL WAGNER | Special to journalist

MONTEVALLO – The University of Montevallo is the best college in the state for English majors and the best university in Alabama for history majors, according to the recently released Niche.com 2022 Best Colleges rankings.

The ranking compared the best English programs in Alabama. UM ranked first in the list of combined public and private higher education institutions.

UM was also named the best public university in the state for majors in history in the 2022 ranking, in a list comparing all public and private universities in the state.

The ranking of the best colleges was based on key statistics such as the graduation rate, program demand, faculty-to-student ratio, student ratings, and data from the US Department of Education.

“I am delighted to see such an affirmation for these programs as well as recognition of the dedication of English and history teachers,” said Dr Ruth Truss, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at UM.

“These professors focus on student success and build on that success through traditional and innovative course offerings, from medieval literature to graphic novels, from the Renaissance to digital history,” Truss said. “Regardless of the course details, the common element is that the faculty constantly encourages students to develop and refine their critical thinking, research and communication skills, thus preparing students for the careers they choose. continue.

Source link

Do athletes have to choose between university and stadium?

By University

Swiss shooter Nina Christen, who dropped out of biology studies to focus on training; she won a gold and a bronze medal at the Tokyo Games in 2020. Keystone / Georgios Kefalas

One third of Swiss athletes who took part in the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 were students or university graduates. Outside the stadium, it is “normal” students who have to juggle between lessons and high-level sports training.

This content was published on September 19, 2021 – 10:00

According to a new study “Elite Sport in Switzerland 2019”, 47% of athletes aged 25 to 34 have a higher education diploma (from a university or a vocational high school). That’s 5 percentage points lower than the rest of the population in the same age group. But it’s still a fairly high figure, explains Simon Niepmann, a former rowing champion who heads the “Elite Sport and Studies” program for Swiss Olympic, the umbrella organization for Swiss sport. An Olympic gold medalist himself, he managed to successfully complete his studies in sport and geography at the University of Basel, earning a bachelor’s degree in five years instead of three.

As its name suggests, the support program it runs aims to enable athletes to embark on a dual career. As part of the program launched in 2014, a network of 42 people is responsible for helping athletes reconcile the demands of competitive sport with their studies. These contact persons are located in almost all Swiss universities and help athletes plan their studies and their sports career years in advance.

“Elite sport and studies”

In 2014, Swiss Olympic launched the “Elite Sport and Studies” project in collaboration with Swiss University Sports – the umbrella organization of university sports clubs. The project became a program in 2017 and has been affiliated with Swiss Olympic since 2018. Swiss Olympic and Swiss University Sports have a close cooperation on this issue.

Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities – the conference of rectors of Swiss universities – signed a declaration in 2017. Their main objectives are to promote optional part-time studies, to lengthen courses and to reduce attendance requirements for athletes from competition.

In 2020, the two organizations signed a second declaration, adding the option of distance learning independent of time and place, which worked well with the study conditions imposed by the Covid.

End of insertion

SWI swissinfo.ch: Why was there hardly any organized support in Switzerland for student-athletes until a few years ago?

Simon Niepmann: In the past, student-athletes were extremely autonomous. During my studies, I noticed that in Switzerland, no difference was made between the students who practiced an elite sport, those who practiced a hobby or those who had a work in parallel with their course. All were considered part-time jobs. It was entirely up to the athletes to organize the time necessary to train for their sport in addition to their studies.

In Switzerland, sport is now seen more and more as a full-time professional activity, even if its status is not yet comparable to that of other countries, where being a sportsman is considered as a profession like any other.

SWI: What is the question that young athletes ask you most often?

SN: The most frequent question is: “I play high level national or international sport. What type of diploma training is an option for me?

Of course, I cannot give a general answer, because all athletes can study business or law. I have to look at each case individually. It depends on the field of study that the athletes are interested in, the demands of their sport, but also where they train and the flexibility offered by the university concerned.

SWI: What is the main support you can offer to student-athletes?

SN: Advance planning. This means starting at an early age to combine competitive sports and study. For example, it is necessary to identify the phases where the studies will require a lot of time and the phases of intensive training.

Ideally, schedule a schedule until graduation – the schedule can be readjusted every six months.

Our main task is to make athletes aware that they have to plan and that there are different people who can help them on their two-lane journey.

SWI: An analysis of the Swiss Olympic study in 2018 shows that top student-athletes are rarely registered as sportsmen or sportswomen when they are admitted to university.

SN: We are faced with two problems. On the one hand, we do not have access to information on all athletes regarding their education; on the other hand, universities do not always know which students are involved in competitive sports. We have a lot of room for improvement in this area.

What we try to do is keep competitive athletes informed, as often and as widely as possible, whether through newsletters, sports clubs or other channels.

We have also noticed that there is often a desire for discussion between student-athletes and young athletes still in high school. If athletes are talking to each other, there is less inhibition in asking simple questions than if they are talking to someone from a college official. We have created an online platform to facilitate this exchange.

SWI: The 2020 statement from Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities makes it clear that not all sports are compatible with all training courses. Which sport-study combinations are particularly difficult?

SN: I would hesitate to say that a certain sport does not work at all with a certain university subject, because it is always important to take into account that it is a very personal choice.

But we notice that winter sportsmen tend to study at a distance. The point is, they’re on the road all season, so they can’t regularly attend a class in person.

In terms of subjects, the most difficult for athletes are certainly those where there is a high proportion of practical work or laboratory lessons where students have to be in a certain place at a certain time.

SWI: The United States and China have long been at the top of the Olympic Games medal rankings. In China, for example, competitive athletes have the opportunity to focus on sports and then obtain favorable conditions for admission to a prestigious university. Are Swiss athletes at a disadvantage compared to competitors from these countries because they are forced to combine studies and sport?

SN: We believe that in a number of cases it is useful for athletes to train alongside their studies. Partly because there are a number of hours in the day that are not devoted to sport and where athletes can do other things, and also because studying is a cognitive distraction that motivates athletes to a higher level. different way.

An environment outside of the sporting world is also important for many athletes. It allows for a change of pace and can be rewarding and calming. Preparation for a post-sports career is also a very important point. When you stop playing sports, it is essential to have a second place to invest your energy and develop.

SWI: How does Switzerland rank in a global comparison in terms of support for student-athletes?

SN: We prefer to compare ourselves to countries of similar size. There are always different approaches. In Norway, sports associations collaborate with specific universities. So there you know more or less that if you play a certain sport, there is a university that cooperates with the national association or the Olympic committee.

With our network of coordinators in Switzerland, we want to show that athletes do not have to limit their options. We prefer to try to keep all options open. It is a process that we will continue to work on.

SWI: Is a dual career in competitive sport and school more a story of compromise, or a win-win situation?

SN: It’s definitely a compromise because you can’t commit 100% to sport and 100% to your studies at the same time. You have to plan and find a balance. Still, I wouldn’t say it devalues ​​both aspects. Studying at the same time doesn’t necessarily mean less success in sports – it often even means the opposite.

Source link

Do athletes have to choose between university and stadium?

By University

Swiss shooter Nina Christen, who dropped out of biology studies to focus on training; she won a gold and a bronze medal at the Tokyo Games in 2020. Keystone / Georgios Kefalas

One third of Swiss athletes who took part in the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 were students or university graduates. Outside the stadium, it is “normal” students who have to juggle between lessons and high-level sports training.

This content was published on September 19, 2021 – 10:00

According to a new study “Elite Sport in Switzerland 2019”, 47% of athletes aged 25 to 34 have a higher education diploma (from a university or a vocational high school). That’s 5 percentage points lower than the rest of the population in the same age group. But it’s still a fairly high figure, explains Simon Niepmann, a former rowing champion who heads the “Elite Sport and Studies” program for Swiss Olympic, the umbrella organization for Swiss sport. An Olympic gold medalist himself, he managed to successfully complete his studies in sport and geography at the University of Basel, earning a bachelor’s degree in five years instead of three.

As its name suggests, the support program it runs aims to enable athletes to embark on a dual career. As part of the program launched in 2014, a network of 42 people is responsible for helping athletes reconcile the demands of competitive sport with their studies. These contact persons are located in almost all Swiss universities and help athletes plan their studies and their sports career years in advance.

“Elite sport and studies”

In 2014, Swiss Olympic launched the “Elite Sport and Studies” project in collaboration with Swiss University Sports – the umbrella organization of university sports clubs. The project became a program in 2017 and has been affiliated with Swiss Olympic since 2018. Swiss Olympic and Swiss University Sports have a close cooperation on this issue.

Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities – the conference of rectors of Swiss universities – signed a declaration in 2017. Their main objectives are to promote optional part-time studies, to lengthen courses and to reduce attendance requirements for athletes from competition.

In 2020, the two organizations signed a second declaration, adding the option of distance learning independent of time and place, which worked well with the study conditions imposed by the Covid.

End of insertion

SWI swissinfo.ch: Why was there hardly any organized support in Switzerland for student-athletes until a few years ago?

Simon Niepmann: In the past, student-athletes were extremely autonomous. During my studies, I noticed that in Switzerland, no difference was made between students who practiced elite sports, those who practiced a hobby or those who had a job in parallel with their course. All were considered part-time jobs. It was entirely up to the athletes to organize the time needed to train for their sport in addition to their studies.

In Switzerland, sport is now seen more and more as a full-time professional activity, even if its status is not yet comparable to that of other countries, where being a sportsman is considered as a profession like any other.

SWI: What is the question that young athletes ask you most often?

SN: The most frequent question is: “I play high level national or international sport. What type of diploma training is an option for me?

Of course, I cannot give a general answer, because all athletes can study business or law. I have to look at each case individually. It depends on the field of study that the athletes are interested in, the demands of their sport, but also where they train and the flexibility offered by the university concerned.

SWI: What is the main support you can offer to student-athletes?

SN: Advance planning. This means starting at an early age to combine competitive sports and study. For example, it is necessary to identify the phases where the studies will require a lot of time and the phases of intensive training.

Ideally, schedule a schedule until graduation – the schedule can be readjusted every six months.

Our main task is to make athletes aware that they have to plan and that there are different people who can help them on their two-lane journey.

SWI: An analysis of the Swiss Olympic study in 2018 shows that top student-athletes are rarely registered as sportsmen or sportswomen when they are admitted to university.

SN: We are faced with two problems. On the one hand, we do not have access to information on all athletes regarding their education; on the other hand, universities do not always know which students are involved in competitive sports. We have a lot of room for improvement in this area.

What we try to do is keep competitive athletes informed, as often and as widely as possible, whether through newsletters, sports clubs or other channels.

We have also noticed that there is often a desire for discussion between student-athletes and young athletes still in high school. If athletes are talking to each other, there is less inhibition in asking simple questions than if they are talking to someone from a college official. We have created an online platform to facilitate this exchange.

SWI: The 2020 statement from Swiss Olympic and swissuniversities makes it clear that not all sports are compatible with all training courses. Which sports-study combinations are particularly difficult?

SN: I would hesitate to say that a certain sport does not work at all with a certain university subject, because it is always important to take into account that it is a very personal choice.

But we notice that winter sportsmen tend to study at a distance. The point is, they’re on the road all season, so they can’t regularly attend a class in person.

In terms of subjects, the most difficult for athletes are certainly those where there is a high proportion of practical work or laboratory lessons where students have to be in a certain place at a certain time.

SWI: The United States and China have long been at the top of the Olympic Games medal rankings. In China, for example, competitive athletes have the opportunity to focus on sports and then obtain favorable conditions for admission to a prestigious university. Are Swiss athletes at a disadvantage compared to competitors from these countries because they are forced to combine studies and sport?

SN: We believe that in a number of cases it is useful for athletes to train alongside their studies. Partly because there are a number of hours in the day that are not devoted to sport and where athletes can do other things, and also because studying is a cognitive distraction that motivates athletes to a higher level. different way.

An environment outside of the sporting world is also important for many athletes. It allows for a change of pace and can be rewarding and calming. Preparation for a post-sports career is also a very important point. When you stop playing sports, it is essential to have a second place to invest your energy and develop.

SWI: How does Switzerland rank in a global comparison in terms of support for student-athletes?

SN: We prefer to compare ourselves to countries of similar size. There are always different approaches. In Norway, sports associations collaborate with specific universities. So there you know more or less that if you play a certain sport, there is a university that cooperates with the national association or the Olympic committee.

With our network of coordinators in Switzerland, we want to show that athletes do not have to limit their options. We prefer to try to keep all options open. It is a process that we will continue to work on.

SWI: Is a dual career in competitive sport and school more a story of compromise, or a win-win situation?

SN: It’s definitely a compromise because you can’t commit 100% to sport and 100% to your studies at the same time. You have to plan and find a balance. Still, I wouldn’t say it devalues ​​both aspects. Studying at the same time doesn’t necessarily mean less success in sports – it often even means the opposite.

Source link

University of Montevallo: University of Montevallo named best public school in the state for English and History

By Public school

September 17, 2021

The University of Montevallo is the state’s top university for English majors and Alabama’s top public university for history majors, according to the recently released Niche.com 2022 ranking of top colleges.

The ranking compared the best English language programs in Alabama, and UM topped the list for combined public and private higher education institutions.

UM was also named the best public university in the state for majors in history in the 2022 ranking, in a list comparing all public and private universities in the state.

The ranking of the best colleges was based on key statistics such as graduation rate, program demand, faculty-to-student ratio, student ratings, and data from the US Department of Education.

“I am delighted to see such an affirmation for these programs as well as recognition of the dedication of English and history teachers,” said Dr Ruth Truss, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at UM. “These professors focus on student success and build on that success through both traditional and innovative course offerings, from medieval literature to graphic novels, from Renaissance to digital history. Regardless of course details. the common element is that the faculty constantly encourages students to develop and refine their critical thinking, research and communication skills, thereby preparing students for the careers they choose to pursue. “

The University of Montevallo is the state’s top university for English majors and Alabama’s top public university for history majors, according to the recently released Niche.com 2022 ranking of top colleges.

The ranking compared the best English language programs in Alabama, and UM topped the list for combined public and private higher education institutions.

UM was also named the best public university in the state for majors in history in the 2022 ranking, in a list comparing all public and private universities in the state.

The ranking of the best colleges was based on key statistics such as graduation rate, program demand, faculty-to-student ratio, student ratings, and data from the US Department of Education.

“I am delighted to see such an affirmation for these programs as well as recognition of the dedication of English and history teachers,” said Dr Ruth Truss, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at UM. “These professors focus on student success and build on that success through both traditional and innovative course offerings, from medieval literature to graphic novels, from Renaissance to digital history. Regardless of course details. the common element is that the faculty constantly encourages students to develop and refine their critical thinking, research and communication skills, thereby preparing students for the careers they choose to pursue. “


This press release was produced by University of Montevallo. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.

Source link

IPS from Allahabad University Begins Two New Integrated 5-Year Courses | Allahabad News

By University
PRAYAGRAJ: Even as the authorities at Allahabad University (UA) started the admission process for the 2021-22 academic session, the University’s Institute of Professional Studies (IPS) decided to make changes to the courses it offers, including closing four courses for lack of student interest.
No new admissions would be made to these courses during this academic session. However, the institute has decided to launch two new integrated five-year courses starting from this session. Last year, IPS had been admitted to 13 courses she was leading. However, this year applications were solicited for admission to only 11 courses. The main reason for the closing of the courses is that the students’ interest in the old courses has diminished or the course has started under a new name.
“Bearing in mind the new education policy, the academic audit work is ongoing at AU and within this framework it has been identified that there are certain courses in IPS in which the interest number of students was almost negligible and it was necessary to start some new and relevant courses. For this reason, four old courses were closed and two new courses would be launched, ”AU public relations manager Jaya Kapoor told TOI on Friday.
IPS also decided that the name BVoc (Bachelor of Professional Courses) in Media Studies would now be changed. The course would now be called BVoc in media productions. The online application process for admission to these courses has also started.
Courses in which applications for admission for the 2021-22 academic session have not been invited by IPS include BVoc’s UG and PG courses in Fashion Design and Technology, Diploma in Fashion Design, MSc Nutrition Science , MVoc in fashion design and technology.
Likewise, aspirants can be admitted to the new academic session in courses such as Bachelor of Computer Application (BCA), Bachelor of Technology and Food Processing, Bachelor of Media Studies, Bachelor of Media Production, bachelor’s degree in fashion design and technology, master’s degree in computer application. (MCA), MSc Food Applications are invited for Technology Admission, MVoc in Media Studies, PG Diploma in Computer Application (PDDCA), five years Integrated UG & PG Food Technology Program, five years Integrated BCA-MCA Data Science Course , etc.
Until last year, IPS had been admitted to courses such as Bachelor of Computer Application (BCA), Master of Computer Application (MCA), PG Diploma in Computer Application (PDDCA), BVoc in Food Processing and Technology, BA in Media Studies, BVoc in Media Studies, etc.
Source link